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I've been using Processing for around two years now, and I really like it. However, I feel like Flash is a bit more useful for coding games, as it's more universal and flexible. I'm starting to feel like I have no idea what I'm doing, and I really don't get any of the concepts like movie clips and the stage and so forth. In Processing, to make, say, a ball, I might make this:

Ball[] ballArray = new Ball[ 0 ]; //Array to store each ball in

void setup() { size( 400, 400 ); }

void draw() { background( 255 ); for( int i = 0; i < ballArray.length; i++ ) { ballArray[ i ].display(); //Run each ball's display code every time step } }

class Ball { PVector location; //Vector to store this ball's location in Ball( int x, int y ) { location = new PVector( x, y ); ballArray = ( Ball[] ) append( ballArray, this ); //Add this ball to the array } void display() { fill( 0 ); ellipse( location.x, location.y ); //Display this ball at its location } }

void mousePressed() { new Ball( mouseX, mouseY ); //Create a new ball at the mouse location }

And that would let me create as many instances as I like, anywhere I like. I haven't the faintest clue how to make a comparable applet in Flash. I've tried making a 'ball' class in a separate .as file, but it gives me an error about too many arguments. I also don't know how to draw a shape directly to the screen.

Can somebody whip up an equivalent of this in Flash so I have something to start from? It'd also be fantastic if I could get some recommended reading for total flash noobs, or developers moving from Java to Flash.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The following is a simple flash movie/app that creates a new instance of Ball and adds it to the stage when and where you click the mouse on the stage. Also upon each creation of a new instance of Ball, its appended to an array of Ball objects called _balls.

Main.as(document class):

package
{
    import com.display.Ball;
    import flash.display.Sprite;
    import flash.events.MouseEvent;

    public class Main extends Sprite
    {
        private var _balls:Array;

        public function Main()
        {
            init();

        }// end function

        private function init():void
        {
            _balls = new Array();

            stage.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, onStageMouseClick);

        }// end function

        private function onStageMouseClick(e:MouseEvent):void
        {
            createBall(e.stageX, e.stageY); 

        }// end function

        private function createBall(p_x:Number, p_y:Number):void
        {
            var ball:Ball = new Ball(p_x, p_y);
            addChild(ball);
            _balls.push(ball);

        }// end function

    }// end class

}// end package

Ball.as:

package com.display
{
    import flash.display.Sprite;

    public class Ball extends Sprite
    {
        private var _radius:Number = 50;
        private var _x:Number;
        private var _y:Number;
        private var _color:uint = 0xFF0000; // red

        public function Ball(p_x:Number, p_y:Number)
        {
            _x = p_x;
            _y = p_y;

            init();

        }// end function

        public function init():void
        {
            draw();

        }// end function

        public function draw():void
        {
            this.graphics.beginFill(_color);
            this.graphics.drawCircle(_x, _y, _radius);
            this.graphics.endFill();

        }// end function

    }// end class

}// end package

I recommend reading the "ActionScript 3.0 Bible by Roger Braunstein" book for flash(as well as flex) "noobs". Also, even if you are experienced with ActionScript 3, it serves as a good reference book.

Also once you start to get a good grip on ActionScript 3, you may want to consider entering the realm of design patterns. To simplfy design patterns into a simple sentence it would probably be that they're "tools for coping with constant change in software design and development". I recommend reading "O'Reilly, ActionScript 3.0 Design Patterns by William Sanders & Chandima Cumaranatunge".

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Thanks! This'll be a great starting point. I like being able to see the same program so I can see what more I need to do in Flash vs Processing. Design patterns may be a bit over my head, I mostly plan on using ActionScript for solo game development, as a hobby, though it'd certainly be nice to know. –  Zane Geiger Jan 31 '11 at 12:44
    
Yh you should wait until you have a good understanding of ActionsScript 3 and an even better understanding of OOP(object oriented programming). But I do recommend you look into design patterns down the line as its a great help in structuring your code for games aswell as other kinds of applications. –  Taurayi Jan 31 '11 at 21:47

Check Colin Mook's Lost Actionscript Week End video tutorial , this will give you a good overview of Actionscript and enough understanding to apply your Processing knowledge to Flash. Bear in mind that in Processing a lot of the methods are hidden from you and you may have to write a lot more code in order to adapt Processing concepts to AS3.

http://tv.adobe.com/show/colin-moocks-lost-actionscript-weekend/

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