Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am unsure how to declare a global union in C. Below is my code (all of which is outside of main).

typedef union{
    int iVal;
    char* cVal;
} DictVal;
struct DictEntry{
    struct DictEntry* next;
    char* key;
    DictVal val;

    int cTag;
};

DictVal find(char* key);

int main()
{
    struct DictEntry dictionary[101];
    //printf("Hello");
}

DictValue find(char* key)
{
  DictVal a;
  a.iVal = 3;
  return a;
}

With this, I receive the error:

test.c:35: error: expected ‘=’, ‘,’, ‘;’, ‘asm’ or ‘__attribute__’ before ‘find’.

How can I declare the union in a way that I can use it as a return type for a function?

Thank you in advance! Andrew

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Alexander, talonmies, blahdiblah, Ram kiran, Bart Mar 7 '13 at 3:53

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Are you sure? That snippet alone compiles fine. –  ephemient Jan 31 '11 at 4:09
1  
@blueberryfields - No, it's just an anonymous union being typedef-ed into a name. –  Chris Lutz Jan 31 '11 at 4:10
2  
What compiler are you using? I can't reproduce this. –  Tim Post Jan 31 '11 at 4:10
1  
Looks like a simple typo: DictVal is not the same as DictValue. –  Raph Levien Jan 31 '11 at 4:27
1  
Not related but main should return a value. –  Trinidad Jan 31 '11 at 4:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You've typo'ed.

There's a DictVal typedef but you tried to use DictValue on the definition.

share|improve this answer

Spelling error.

You declared:

 typedef union{
     int iVal;
     char* cVal;
 } DictVal;

but are trying to use

 DictValue find(char* key)
 {
   DictVal a;

Replace DictValue with DictVal.

Also make main return something. Normally it should be 0.

God bless!

share|improve this answer
    
Sadly, C99 codified the exemption that C++98 also gives to main(); it does not have to explicitly return a value and exiting from the end of main() is equivalent to return 0 or EXIT_SUCCESS. But I agree, it is better to use an explicit return. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 31 '11 at 4:37
    
Oh really? But shouldn't main() be declared as void, then? Also, then my gcc version is not compliant (or has this flag disabled in the IDE options) because it returns 1 with that code. –  Trinidad Jan 31 '11 at 4:42
    
@Jonathan Leffler - The standard also specifies gets() but that doesn't mean you should use it ever. –  Chris Lutz Jan 31 '11 at 5:37
2  
@Chris: and strtok() and strncat() and ... yes, just because it is in the standard does not mean you have to use it. Trinidad: no, main() has to be defined returning an int, and it may take either no arguments or two arguments and be compliant; anything else is not standard, but may also be legal if your implementation documents that it is legal. Did you compile with -std=c99 or some other setting? I compiled int main(){} with gcc -std=c89 and got 32 as the exit status; I compiled the same code with gcc -std=c99 and got the exit status 0. That is pretty compliant-looking to me. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 31 '11 at 5:43
    
No, declaring void main is always undefined behavior. The point Jonathan was making was that main implicitly returns 0 if execution reaches the end of the body without a return statement. But the return type must always be int. –  R.. Jan 31 '11 at 6:56

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.