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I'm attempting to pass a pointer to a function that is defined in one class into another class. After much research, I believe my syntax is correct, but I am still getting compiler errors. Here is some code which demonstrates my issue:

class Base
{
public:
    BaseClass();
    virtual ~BaseClass();
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    // assign strFunction to the function pointer passed in
    Derived(string (*funPtr)(int)) : strFunction(funPtr);
    ~Derived();

private:
    // pointer to the function that is passed in
    string (*strFunction)(int value);
};

class MainClass
{
public:
    MainClass()
    {
    	// allocate a new Derived class and pass it a pointer to myFunction
    	Base* myClass = new Derived(&MainClass::myFunction);	
    }

    string myFunction(int value)
    {
    	// return a string
    }
};

When I try to compile this code, the error I get is

error: no matching function for call to 'Derived::Derived(string (MainClass::*)(int))'

followed by

note: candidates are: Derived::Derived(string (*)(int))

Any idea what I might be doing wrong?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 8 down vote accepted

your syntax is correct for a C style function pointer. Change it to this:

Derived(string (MainClass::*funPtr)(int)) : strFunction(funPtr) {}

and

string (MainClass::*strFunction)(int value);

remember to call strFunction, you will need an instance of a MainClass object. Often I find it useful to use typedefs.

typedef string (MainClass::*func_t)(int);
func_t strFunction;

and

Derived(func_t funPtr) : strFunction(funPtr) {}
share|improve this answer
    
and what about if the classes are decoupled and you cannot specify 'MainClass::*funPtr' ? –  fduff Aug 13 '12 at 11:57
    
Then I would recommend using a generic library like making the parameter a boost::function<std::string()> and passing the function with boost::bind –  Evan Teran Aug 13 '12 at 12:46
    
tx but what about non-boost project? std::function() and std::bind() are only available in C++11 which we dont have. –  fduff Aug 13 '12 at 12:48
    
@fduff: they are actually accessible in tr1 as well. If that is still not an option, I would either recommend updating your toolchain, or asking a more detailed question here on stackoverflow and letting someone come up with an answer more tailored for your specific goals. –  Evan Teran Aug 13 '12 at 14:15
    
you're right, these functions are part of the tr1, which is available under vs2010. I'll take a closer look, tx. –  fduff Aug 13 '12 at 14:56

You can learn more about the grave wickedness that is C++ member function pointer syntax here.

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+1 for the link to the Clugston article. Good stuff. –  Michael Burr Jan 27 '09 at 21:08

Yes, the type of &MainClass::myFunction is a pointer-to-member type whereas string(*)(int) is a pointer-to-function type. They are not compatible as you have to use a reference or pointer to a class instance and use the .* or ->* operators to use a pointer-to-member, whereas a pointer to a function is not attached to a class and can be called directly.

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You are trying to pass a pointer to a member function of the class MainClass, but the function expects a pointer to an ordinary, ie non-member, function. A good summary is here

The difference is important because member functions have a hidden extra parameter which tells the function which "this" pointer to apply the function to. So the pointer types aren't interchangeable.

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Function pointers (that is pointers to unbound functions) and pointers-to-methods (that is pointers to non-static functions bound to a class definition), are different in c++. This is because non-static methods have an implicit this argument which requires that they always be called in the context of a instance of their class.

You're trying to pass a method-pointer to a constructor that takes a function-pointer. Which won't work.

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That makes sense. –  Chris Jan 28 '09 at 19:06

Another syntax issue :


    // assign strFunction to the function pointer passed in
    Derived(string (*funPtr)(int)) : strFunction(funPtr);

replace for :


    // assign strFunction to the function pointer passed in
    Derived(string (*funPtr)(int)) : strFunction(funPtr) {};
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You may want to look into using std::tr1::bind and std::tr1::function similar to this (untested) code:

class Derived: public Base
{
  public:
    typedef std::tr1::function<string(int)> StringFunc;

    Derived(StringFunc);

  ...

  private:
    StringFunc strFunction;
}

and in MainClass constructor:

myBase = new Derived(std::tr1::bind(&MainClass::myFunction, *this, _1);

The bind function basically binds the member function to a particular object. Which takes care of the this pointer that is inserted by the compiler.

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Object methods have a hidden "this" argument. If you pass the method to another class, what gets filled into the "this" argument? You might be able to do it with static (Class) methods.

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As the compiler warning is indicating, member function pointers are completely different from regular function pointers.

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