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I want to define a constructor in an abstract class that will create concrete subclasses.

abstract class A {
  type Impl <: A
  def construct() : Impl = {
    val res = new Impl() //compile error: class type required but A.this.Impl found
    // do more initialization with res
  }
}

class B extends A {type Impl = B}
class C extends A {type Impl = C}
//...
val b = new B
b.construct() // this should create a new instance of B

What is wrong here? Is this even possible to implement? EDIT: Clarification: I want to abstract over the construct method. I do not want to call separately new B and new C from either subclasses or companion objects.

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What advantage do you gain by avoiding calling new B or new C? –  Monkey Jan 31 '11 at 6:56
    
I may have many subclasses (B, C, D, ...) and I want to avoid duplicates/boilerplate code. –  Adrian Jan 31 '11 at 7:27
    
The only way you can do what you want to do is to use reflection. Which, as I stated in my answer, is not a great idea. –  Monkey Jan 31 '11 at 7:53
    
If you have many subtypes all doing the same initialisation, you probably have bad design. In general, why don't you just call the constructor of A? Like that: class B extends A(param1, ...) { ... }. Then A would be a proper abstraction and not just some hack. –  Raphael Jan 31 '11 at 9:59
    
What I want to do is to eventually call construct() from a method in class A without knowing the concrete class. So I cannot call new B(). This is what I am trying to do with new Impl(), but here I get the compiler error. This error is similar to the error one gets when using parameterized types (type erasure). So I think using reflection with manifests may solve the problem - as per the answer from @Monkey –  Adrian Jan 31 '11 at 16:04
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6 Answers

You need to explicitly invoke a constructor if you want create a new instance.

abstract class A {

  def newInstance(): this.type;

  def construct() : this.type = {
    val res = newInstance()
  }
}

class B extends A {
  def newInstance() = new B()
}

Scala erases type at runtime so there is no way to know what Impl meant when the class was created.

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This does not work. You will get a compilation error on the new B() since this.type is a singleton type - type of the instance itself that is different from type B. You just cannot create an object of a singleton type. –  fikovnik Dec 20 '12 at 12:37
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You would put the constructor in the companion object, not in the abstract class. Like this:

object A {
  def apply(i:Int):A = new B(...)
  def apply(s:String):A = new C(...)
}

Now, you could create an instance of A by calling A(42), or A("foobar"), for example. The string and integer parameters are only examples, of course. If the parameters for all the constructors have the same types, this overloading will not work. In that case, you can easily create different methods and call them something other than apply.

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You can use reflection to create a new instance. Something like this would work but in my opinion is not worth the trouble. For one thing you would only be able to check if a suitable constructor existed at runtime.

def newInstance[T:ClassManifest]:T = {
  val klass = implicitly[ClassManifest[T]].erasure
  val constr = klass.getConstructors()(0)
  constr.newInstance().asInstanceOf[T]
}

abstract class A {
  def construct(implicit cm:ClassManifest[this.type]): this.type = {
    val res = newInstance[this.type]
    res
  }
}

class B extends A
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You can, but that's almost never the best way to do this kind of thing in Scala. –  Kevin Wright Jan 31 '11 at 9:15
    
Is it in any language? –  Raphael Feb 1 '11 at 10:44
    
Why do you use Manifests here? There is no erasure, there are no parameterized types. –  Adrian Feb 3 '11 at 7:10
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Looks like this is not possible. According to the Scala book (by Oderski, Spoon, Venners) you cannot create an instance of an abstract type. See: Abstract Types chapter, Currencies case study. This may be supported later with "virtual classes".

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I propose the following pattern:

abstract class A($params) {
  // do common initialisation here
  def construct() : A

  def foo(...) = {
    ...
    val bar = construct()
    ...
  }
}

class B($moreparams) extends A($someparams) {
  // do special initialisation here
  def construct() = new B()
}

All reduandancy you have now is precisely one line per subclass. I consider this a small price to pay for a) a working solution that b) does not use reflection (which breaks essentially all guarantees a static type system offers you).

I am still curious why you would need construct inside A. Smells fishy.

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Following my comment left at Monkey response. One way how to solve this is to use the the Curiously Recurring Template Pattern (CRTP) together with a self types:

abstract class A[T <: A[T]] { this: T =>

  def newInstance(): T;

  def construct(): T = {
    val res = newInstance()
    res
  }

  def some(): T = this
}

class B extends A[B] {
  def newInstance() = new B()
}

Perhaps there is a better solution, but this is so far what I found.

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