Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Javascript, how can one determine the number of formal parameters defined for a function?

Note, this is not the arguments parameter when the function is called, but the number of named arguments the function was defined with.

function zero() {
    // Should return 0
}

function one(x) {
    // Should return 1
}

function two(x, y) {
    // Should return 2
}
share|improve this question
1  
What is the arity of function(){ return arguments[0]; } ? –  atnnn Jan 31 '11 at 6:29
2  
@atnnn 0, of course. –  Phrogz Jan 31 '11 at 6:31
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 29 down vote accepted
> zero.length
0
> one.length
1
> two.length
2

Source

A function can determine its own arity (length) like this:

// For IE, and ES5 strict mode (named function)
function foo(x, y, z) {
    return foo.length; // Will return 3
}

// Otherwise
function bar(x, y) {
    return arguments.callee.length; // Will return 2
}
share|improve this answer
    
I intended to answer my own question since it wasn't on Stack Overflow but you beat me to it! I will update your answer with technique for a function to determine its own arity. –  JasonSmith Jan 31 '11 at 6:28
    
You mean arguments.callee.length? –  Phrogz Jan 31 '11 at 6:28
    
Yes I did mean that. –  JasonSmith Jan 31 '11 at 6:30
7  
Note that this is not the same as arguments.length, which is the number of arguments actually received. –  Josh Lee Jan 31 '11 at 6:30
3  
@jhs: Note also that arguments.callee throws an error in ECMAScript 5 strict mode, meaning it has effectively been removed from the language. –  Tim Down Jan 31 '11 at 9:59
show 6 more comments

A function's arity is stored in its .length property.

function zero() {
    return arguments.callee.length;
}

function one(x) {
    return arguments.callee.length;
}

function two(x, y) {
    return arguments.callee.length;
}

> console.log("zero="+zero() + " one="+one() + " two="+two())
zero=0 one=1 two=2
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.