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I need a sample, without replacement, from among all possible tuples of numbers from range(n). That is, I have a collection of (0,0), (0,1), ..., (0,n), (1,0), (1,1), ..., (1,n), ..., (n,0), (n,1), (n,n), and I'm trying to get a sample of k of those elements. I am hoping to avoid explicitly building this collection.

I know random.sample(range(n), k) is simple and efficient if I needed a sample from a sequence of numbers rather than tuples of numbers.

Of course, I can explicitly build the list containing all possible (n * n = n^2) tuples, and then call random.sample. But that probably is not efficient if k is much smaller than n^2.

I am not sure if things work the same in Python 2 and 3 in terms of efficiency; I use Python 3.

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2  
Tuples are sequences, so your sentence "needed a sample from a sequence of numbers rather than tuples of numbers." makes no sense. To you mean you need a sample from a sequence of tuples? It's unclear in that case how these tuples look. –  Lennart Regebro Jan 31 '11 at 10:25
    
Your code (random.sample(range(n), k) works and is correct for all sequences, tuples, lists, strings and any subclass of collections.Sequence. Did you try your code yet? What's the question? –  S.Lott Jan 31 '11 at 11:07
    
@Regebro: 'a sample from tuples' = 'a sample of k tuples out of a sequence of n tuples'. 'a sample from a sequence' = 'a sample of k elements out of a sequence of n elements'. I'm going to edit the question to clarify. @S.Lott: what I meant is that I can't refer to a sequence ((0,0), (0,1), (0,2), (1,0), (1,1), (1,2), (2,0), (2,1), (2,2)) as a simple range on which I can simply apply sample. –  max Jan 31 '11 at 20:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Depending on how many of these you're selecting, it might be simplest to just keep track of what things you've already picked (via a set) and then re-pick until you get something that you haven't picked already.

The other option is to just use some simple math:

numbers_in_nxn = random.sample(range(n*n), k) # Use xrange in Python 2.x
tuples_in_nxn = [divmod(x,n) for x in numbers_in_nxn]
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I think that you meant random.sample(range(n*n),k) because that's what I was writing up when I realized that you had put this part in. –  Justin Peel Jan 31 '11 at 6:58
    
+1 The second option seems perfect to me (after replacing n * n with range(n*n), and 100 with n). I can't think of when drawing from a set could be better, given that sample is claimed to be highly efficient. –  max Jan 31 '11 at 7:05
1  
You can replace (x % n, x // n) with divmod(x,n). –  Kabie Jan 31 '11 at 10:38
    
+1 for clever answer (and understanding what the OP wanted, apparently). Would also be good in Python 2.x if range was changed to xrange. –  martineau Jan 31 '11 at 16:11
    
@Kabie, divmod(x,n) would return (x // n, x % n) not (x % n, x // n), so it's not exactly the same, although I don't think that matters here (and therefore also think @J.F. Sebastian's comment is irrelevant). –  martineau Jan 31 '11 at 16:28

Without trying (no python at hand):

random.shuffle(range(n))[:k]

see comments. Didn't sleep enough...

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That doesn't give tuples in n x n, because it would never give, say (1,1). –  Amber Jan 31 '11 at 6:44
    
But then what does "without replacement" mean? Ah, now I see. k distinct tuples of length n. –  Howard Jan 31 '11 at 6:46

You say:

Of course, I can explicitly build the list containing all possible (n * n = n^2) tuples, and then call random.sample. But that probably is not efficient if k is much smaller than n^2.

Well, how about building the tuple after you have randomly picked one? Ie, if you can build the tuples before you randomly choose which one to pick, you can do the picking first and building later.

I don't understand how your tuples are supposed to look, but here is an example, although I realize your tuples are all of the same length, this shows the principle:

Instead of doing this:

>>> import random
>>> all_sequences = [range(x) for x in range(10)]
>>> all_sequences
[[], [0], [0, 1], [0, 1, 2], [0, 1, 2, 3], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]]
>>> random.sample(all_sequences, 3)
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]]

You would do this:

>>> import random
>>> selection = random.sample(range(10), 3)
>>> [range(x) for a in selection]
[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]]
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