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Let's say I had the following table:

id | name | points  
-------------------
1  | joe  | 100  
2  | bob  | 95  
3  | max  | 95  
4  | leo  | 90

Can I produce a reversed rank recordset like so:

id | name | points | rank  
--------------------------
4  | leo  | 90     | 1  
3  | max  | 95     | 2.5  
2  | bob  | 95     | 2.5   
1  | joe  | 100    | 4  
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a fully working example, with this sample table

create table tpoints (id int, name varchar(10), points int);
insert tpoints values
(1  ,'joe', 100 ),
(2  ,'bob', 95  ),
(3  ,'max', 95  ),
(4  ,'leo', 90  );

The MySQL query

select t.*, sq.`rank`
from
(
    select
       points,
        @rank := case when @g = points then @rank else @rn + (c-1)/2.0 end `rank`,
       @g := points,
       @rn := @rn + c
    from 
       (select @g:=null, @rn:=1) g,
        (select points, count(*) c
        from tpoints
        group by points
        order by points asc) p
) sq inner join tpoints t on t.points = sq.points
order by t.points asc;

It also has the benefit of performing very well compared to performing a correlated cross (self) join.

  • 1x pass through tpoints to aggregate into groups
  • calculation of rank with ties
  • 1x join to table to put ranks against the records.
share|improve this answer
    
this actually looks good buddy! –  voldomazta Jan 31 '11 at 11:42
    
great - if it works, please tick next to the answer to accept it. thanks –  RichardTheKiwi Jan 31 '11 at 11:43
    
This will return x.5 for any number of "x" duplicates. If there's three duplicates of say "9", they'll all be "9.5" rather than "9.333...". Could also be done without the self join. –  OMG Ponies Jan 31 '11 at 15:49
    
the requirement is when some records tie for a rank, you total the number of those ranks and divide them by the number records that tied for that rank which cyberwiki nailed perfectly. also thanks OMG Ponies for taking the time to answer. –  voldomazta Jan 31 '11 at 18:47
    
@omg - This will return x.5 for any number of "x" duplicates. If there's three duplicates of say "9", they'll all be "9.5" rather than "9.333...". And you have verified that by taking 2 minutes to test? Could also be done without the self join. - I would like to see how that is done; I may yet learn some tricks from you if you would care to share. –  RichardTheKiwi Jan 31 '11 at 20:07

Won't do "2.5" as a rank value, but duplicates will have the same number if you use:

  SELECT x.id, 
         x.name,
         x.points,
         (SELECT COUNT(*)
            FROM YOUR_TABLE y
           WHERE y.points <= x.points) AS rank
    FROM YOUR_TABLE x
ORDER BY x.points 
share|improve this answer
    
If it won't provide the answer, why pose it? –  RichardTheKiwi Jan 31 '11 at 11:16
    
Not sure what isn't an answer when a functioning query is provided, requirements are acknowledged but left to the OP to clarify further. –  OMG Ponies Jan 31 '11 at 15:44

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