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I would like to create a piece of code in java that will convert a decimal value to binary without using an in-built binary converter command.

But it doesn't work...

public class MainFrame {
public static void binary(int number) {

    String result = new String();

    int binaryValues[] = {1024, 512, 256, 128, 64, 32, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1};

    if (number == 0) {
        result = result + "0";
    } else if (number == 1) {
        result = result + "1";
    } else {
        for (int i = 0; i < 11; i++) {
            while(number >= binaryValues[i]) {
                if (number % binaryValues[i] >= 0) {
                    result = result + "1";
                    number -= binaryValues[i];
                } else {
                    result = result + "0";
    //              number -= binaryValues[i];
                }
            }
        }
    }

    System.out.println(result);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    binary(5);
}
}
share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Raedwald, Jayan, Mayur Birari, Johannes Kuhn, Werner Kvalem Vesterås Sep 9 '13 at 11:04

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
is this homework? –  Bozho Jan 31 '11 at 9:27
1  
Looks like homework and you have a code. Please explain what you have understood so far. –  Shamim Hafiz Jan 31 '11 at 9:29
    
its not homework, i'm just interested in how to do it –  java Jan 31 '11 at 9:36
    
Learning to program is both fun and frustrating. Writing everything from scratch is educating but sometimes it's better to know what is available from the api than writing it by yourself, like: Integer.toBinaryString(5) –  Kennet Jan 31 '11 at 9:46
    
I am aware of the toBinaryString command and if I needed to generate a binary value as a part of a larger program that is what I would use, but I was just interested in writing some code that would have the same result. –  java Jan 31 '11 at 9:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Remove this line from the else block:

number -= binaryValues[i];

Reason: if the number is not bigger than 2n, then you want to add 0 and do not want to substract 2n.

And remove the while statement, it's not necessary (unless all numbers are less then 212). Just keep the for loop and the if/else.

And finally, the if condition doesn't take modulo but a minus. The following works for me:

for (int i = 0; i < 11; i++) {
    if (number - binaryValues[i] >= 0) {
        result = result + "1";
        number -= binaryValues[i];
    } else {
        result = result + "0";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
that makes sense but its still not working –  java Jan 31 '11 at 9:35
    
just the for-loop / if-else still dosn't do the trick :( –  java Jan 31 '11 at 9:41
    
@Java - there were three logical errors in the algorithm - now it works as expected. –  Andreas_D Jan 31 '11 at 9:47
    
now I see, you don't even need to use % you just need to check that if the decimal value can have the binaryValue taken away from it then append a "1" else append a "0", basically –  java Jan 31 '11 at 9:53

For ints >= 0:

public class DecimalToBinary {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int dec = 127;
        StringBuilder binary = new StringBuilder();
        do {
            binary.insert(0, dec % 2);
            dec /= 2;
        } while (dec != 0);
        System.out.println(binary.toString());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
well that works but i don't really underatand it –  java Jan 31 '11 at 9:38
    
number % 2 is either 1 or 0, by applying '%' you are getting binary digits (from the right side) and by applying '/' you are moving to digit at higher position. It is like you you wanted to get decimal digits (try to apply dec%10 and dec/10). The only difference is that for binary you divide by 2. –  padis Jan 31 '11 at 19:55
import java.util.Scanner;
public class BinaryConversion {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
System.out.println("Enter a decimal number: ");
    int numerator = input.nextInt();
        int num = numerator;
        boolean runLoop = true;
    String digit = "";
    while(runLoop){
        int bin = numerator % 2;
    numerator = (numerator / 2);
    digit= bin+digit;
    if (numerator == 0) {
        break;
    }

    }
    input.close();
    System.out.println("The binary value of "+num+" is "+digit);
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you expand on how/why this works to resolve the question? –  Denomales Sep 9 '13 at 4:51

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