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This question obviously assume that we don't want to use templates for this type (for whatever reasons).

class Product
{
public:
   Product( decltype(mPrice) price_, decltype(mLabel) label_ )  // 1.
      : mPrice( price_ ), mLabel( label_ )
   {}

   decltype(mPrice) price() const {return mPrice;} // 2.
   decltype(mLabel) label() const {return mLabel;} // 2.


private:

   float mPrice ; // type might later be changed to more acurate floating point abstraction
   std::string mLabel; // type might later be changed by a special localization-oriented string
};

The question is : are 1. and 2. allowed and possible (or even specifically defined) in C++0x?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

All you have to do is declare mPrice and mLabel before you use decltype:

class Product
{
private:
   float mPrice ;
   std::string mLabel;
public:
   Product( decltype(mPrice) price_, decltype(mLabel) label_ )  // 1.
      : mPrice( price_ ), mLabel( label_ )
   {}

   decltype(mPrice) price() const {return mPrice;} // 2.
   decltype(mLabel) label() const {return mLabel;} // 2.
};

This compiles fine under g++ 4.4 with -std=c++0x.

Edit The point is, the compiler has to be able to parse function declarations on the first pass. The body of a member function can be compiled after the member declarations have been parsed, but the member declarations themselves have to be immediately intelligible -- otherwise, where does the poor compiler start?

So the type of every member function argument must be known as soon as it is encountered.

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Cool! Is it standard behaviour or only gcc implementation behaviour? –  Klaim Jan 31 '11 at 13:28
    
As far as I know, this is standard behaviour. –  TonyK Jan 31 '11 at 14:11
    
@Klaim The standard says "A late-specified return type is most useful for a type that would be more complicated to specify before the declarator-id" which seems to indicate that putting the decltype before the function is valid and trailing return value is optional for cases where its easier (or lamdas where needed) –  MerickOWA Jan 31 '11 at 19:52
1  
@MerickOWA: Klaim never asked about late-specified return types! That was just a red herring introduced by peoro, and really has nothing to do with this question. –  TonyK Jan 31 '11 at 20:14
    
I was trying to point where in the C++0x spec someone might look for support that your syntax IS valid. I was pointing out that the standard seems to assume your syntax to be valid and added trailing return types to support tricky situtations (which this is not). –  MerickOWA Jan 31 '11 at 22:34

Yes, but with a different syntax:

auto price() -> decltype(mPrice) { return mPrice; }
auto price() -> decltype(mPrice) { return mPrice; }

More general:

auto function( ... ) -> decltype(EXPRESSION) ...

function return type will be the type of EXPRESSION


EDIT

about the case 1 I'm not sure. I don't think is valid, since don't think that mPrice is a valid expression in such context: you're using a non static function member (Product::mPrime) without an object.

My guess is also that if mPrime was a static member it would work.

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Are you sure, I'm getting a compilation error with g++ because the variables aren't in scope (which makes sense since they are instance variables). –  Motti Jan 31 '11 at 10:11
    
You don't answer for the 1. case. –  Klaim Jan 31 '11 at 10:21
    
@Klaim: updated my answer –  peoro Jan 31 '11 at 10:45
    
Uhm, any reason for the -1? –  peoro Jan 31 '11 at 11:00
1  
The downvote might be because the answer is plain wrong -- see my answer. (And no, it wasn't me!) –  TonyK Jan 31 '11 at 14:13

vc++ 2010 compiles this w/o errors:


class Product
{
private:

   float mPrice ; 
   std::string mLabel; 
public:
   Product( decltype(mPrice) price_, decltype(mLabel) label_ ) 
      : mPrice( price_ ), mLabel( label_ ){}

   auto price(decltype(mPrice)* p=NULL) const -> decltype(mPrice) {return mPrice;}

   auto label(decltype(mPrice)* m=NULL) const -> decltype(mLabel)  {return mLabel;}

};

but if I remove dummy default parameters from methods declarations, the error appears again. decltype in return type works only if it also appears in some function parameter (???)

(Sorry, I understand that it should be a comment, but it's seems interesting and it's not convinient to put code into comments)

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This compiles fine under g++ 4.4.0 with -std=c++0x, even after removing the dummy default parameters. See ideone.com/jGrak for proof. –  TonyK Jan 31 '11 at 17:22
    
@TonyK: I had almost no doubt that gcc should compile this code if it compiles the code you present in your answer. Errors are probably msvc++ specific, but very strange, however. –  user396672 Jan 31 '11 at 18:33
    
Interestingly, it doesn't seem to matter what the parameter is, just so long as there is one. The parameter could be just "auto price( int = 0)" and it still works. –  MerickOWA Jan 31 '11 at 19:35
    
So just another Microsoft cock-up then. –  TonyK Jan 31 '11 at 20:16

AFAIK this is not legal since the instance variables are not in scope at the points you use them.

Consider what would happen if you had the following variables declared before your class:

int mPrice;
char mLabel;
class Product
{ /*...*/ };

In the function decleration mPrice would bind to the global variable rather than the instance member.

Both g++ 4.5 and VS10 refuse to compile your code since mPrice and mLabel are out of scope.

However this seems to be inconsistent with default parameters.

int mPrice = 3;
class Product
{ // ...
   int foo(int i = mPrice) { return i; }
};

Product p(5.3, "hi");
std::cout << p.foo(); 

This gives me a compilation error:

invalid use of non-static data member 'Product::mPrice'

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Well, I don't know, because decltype() accepts expressions, so the point is that the expression isn't evaluated in this case, but it is in your example. So what I'm asking is in the case of decltype(), will it be able to use the expression or is it explicitely forbidden? –  Klaim Jan 31 '11 at 11:15

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