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In GCC I got the following error:

aes.c: In function ‘copy_block’:
aes.c:278: error: lvalue required as increment operand
aes.c:278: error: lvalue required as increment operand

This is the piece of code:

static void copy_block( void * d, void *s, uint_8t nn )
{
    while( nn-- )
        *((uint_8t*)d)++ = *((uint_8t*)s)++;
}

I tried to change it to a compileable version, but unfortunately for me as a Java programmer, it's not clear what is really happening here.

Maybe someone has an idea how I can change the source that it is compileable in GCC or someone has an idea what is happening here in detail. For me it seems wierd with the dereferencing of the left hand value, but somehow it seems to work perfectly in Visual C++.

This is a small legacy program, which I have to port to a Linux machine.

thank you for your help in advance.

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1  
I think you want uint8_t... –  Christoph Jan 31 '11 at 12:26

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try this:

#include <string.h>
static void copy_block( void * d, void *s, uint_8t nn ) {
  memcpy(d, s, (size_t)nn);
}

What's being done there isn't good.

share|improve this answer
1  
That's C++ ... the post is tagged "C", so I'd stick with (size_t)nn –  246tNt Jan 31 '11 at 11:13
    
Why not just #define copy_block memcpy and make it more useful? –  Chris Lutz Jan 31 '11 at 11:14
1  
@Chris - I assume there is some reason for writing 'copy_block' instead of 'memcpy' in the first place - indirection for logging or something. Global replace would be even better than a #define alias. –  sje397 Jan 31 '11 at 11:16
    
@246tNt - done. –  sje397 Jan 31 '11 at 11:16
    
@sje397 Hehe :) But you obviously need to replace the #include <cstring> with #include <string.h> as well :p –  246tNt Jan 31 '11 at 11:17

This should do it:

static void copy_block(void *d, void *s, uint_8t nn)
{
    uint_8t *ud = (uint_8t *)d;
    uint_8t *us = (uint_8t *)s;

    while (nn--)
    {
        *ud = *us;
        ++ud;
        ++us;
    }
}

It's also much more readable.

share|improve this answer
    
the casts are unnecessary and non-idiomatic in C –  Christoph Jan 31 '11 at 12:28
    
Use this code instead! Writing utterly obfuscated code as done in the original post should be made criminal! –  Lundin Jan 31 '11 at 12:47

This is some seriously hairy looking code. Looks like there's an issue with precedence rules on the *(pointer)++ subexpressions. (that Visual C++ accepts it is somewhere between miracle and bug) It seems to be just a (terrible) memcpy reimplementation, so I suggest you use the standard version:

memcpy(d, s, nn);

I suggest doing a quick characterisation test in Visual C++ to make sure the two versions of the code do in fact do the same thing (as they appear to). You might be relying on some quirky edge case in the compiler here.

share|improve this answer
    
There's no issue there - that syntax is in K&R (I believe) doing exactpy what it's doing here. –  Chris Lutz Jan 31 '11 at 11:15
    
the problem lies with rvalue semantics, not operator precedence... –  Christoph Jan 31 '11 at 12:47

The problem is that casts return rvalues, but you're trying to do an autoincrement on the pointer returned by a cast. Try this:

uint8_t *da = d, *sa = s;
while(nn--) *da++ = *sa++;

Two other notes:

  • nn should probably be a good deal larger than uint8_t and should probably be size_t.
  • With that change, this function is named memcpy and is found (probably more efficiently) in your standard library (in string.h I believe).
share|improve this answer
    
@Chris: hope you don't mind my changes... –  Christoph Jan 31 '11 at 12:40
    
@Christoph - Not at all. Now it looks less like I wrote it on my iPhone. :P –  Chris Lutz Jan 31 '11 at 20:49

Why is everyone assuming that you must always use the library functions whenever possible?

On high-integrity systems, you want to avoid library functions like the plauge, because as soon as you include a library header, you must verify all source code inside it, making sure it is bug free. Verifying the whole string.h and running it through static analyzis tools etc is not an amusing task.

For all non-PC programmers, here is a MISRA-C:2004 compliant version you can use.

void gpfunc_memcpy (void* s1, const void* s2, uint16 n)
{
        uint8* u_s1 =       (uint8*) s1;
  const uint8* u_s2 = (const uint8*) s2;

  while(n != 0)
  {
    *u_s1 = *u_s2;

    ++u_s1;
    ++u_s2;  
    --n;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I never used MISRA-C, but I'd consider this code non-idiomatic, and, as far as I can tell, in violation of advisory 44 of the 1998 edition: unnecessary explicit casting can hide bugs and should be avoided –  Christoph Jan 31 '11 at 13:57
    
1998 is obsolete. In MISRA-2004, there is a text below chapter 6.11 stating: "Conversion involving pointer types require an explicit cast when: - The conversation is between a pointer to object and a pointer to void, and the destination type carries all the type qualifiers of the source type". Whether this text is normative or not, I don't know. But I'm fairly certain that the cast doesn't violate MISRA-C. –  Lundin Jan 31 '11 at 14:43

You probably screwed up the parenthesis position. You want to increment the pointer, not the dereferenced value.

static void copy_block( void * d, void *s, uint_8t nn )
{
    while( nn-- )
        *((uint_8t*)d++) = *((uint_8t*)s++);
}

As a bonus tip, use memcpy ... much faster !

share|improve this answer
1  
Postfix ++ has higher precedence than unary * unless I'm sorely mistaken. –  Chris Lutz Jan 31 '11 at 11:13
1  
No, postfix ++ is higher precedence, which means it binds tighter than *, which means you didn't need to parenthesize anything. The code still doesn't work because you're using the increment operator on an rvalue, which is what the error stated. –  Chris Lutz Jan 31 '11 at 11:20
3  
That's a lot of arguing over something that supposed to be basic feature of a language. Maybe it's a good idea not to write code in such way that it is easy to misread it. –  detunized Jan 31 '11 at 11:24
1  
K&R, like anyone programming in the 70s, wrote code like they did because they wanted to save hard drive space occupied by the source code files. Unless a few more bytes of source code on your Terrabyte HD is a major concern of yours, don't write obfuscated code. Use the version posted by detunized below, it should be completely equivalent performance-wise. –  Lundin Jan 31 '11 at 12:54
1  
@246tNt: you're missing the -pedantic flag: your code makes use of non-standard compiler-extensions... –  Christoph Jan 31 '11 at 12:59

Should be:

static void copy_block( void * d, void *s, uint_8t nn )
{
    while( nn-- )
        (*((uint_8t*)d))++ = (*((uint_8t*)s))++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Did you try this? –  David Gelhar Jan 31 '11 at 11:09
    
Same problem as the original code ... no hope of working. I'm surprised visual-c++ compiled it. .. –  246tNt Jan 31 '11 at 11:12
    
No I didn't, I should have. –  programmersbook Jan 31 '11 at 11:21

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