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By definition ruby hashes return nil when a key is not present. But I need to use a custom message in the place of nil. So I'm using something like this:

val = h['key'].nil? ? "No element present" : h['key']

But this has a serious drawback. If there's a assigned nil against the key this will return "No element present" in that case also.

Is there a way to achieve this flawlessly?

Thanks

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The question is “How to know if a key is present in the hash”, not “How to return something else than nil” ;-) –  arnaud576875 Jan 31 '11 at 12:15
    
The important question is whether you want all accesses of this hash to behave this way, or whether you just need a custom message in this case (assigning to val at this point in your program). The latter is much safer, and Tarscher and Sarwar both have your answer. –  glenn mcdonald Jan 31 '11 at 13:47
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4 Answers 4

up vote -2 down vote accepted

Initialize your hash this way:

> hash = Hash.new{|hash,key| hash[key] = "No element against #{key}"}
 => {}
> hash['a']
 => "No element against a" 
> hash['a'] = 123
 => 123 
> hash['a'] 
 => 123 
> hash['b'] = nil
 => nil 
> hash['b']
 => nil 

Hope this helps :)

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The question is “How to know if a key is present in the hash”, not “How to return something else than nil” ;-) –  arnaud576875 Jan 31 '11 at 12:16
    
This will actually store "No element against #{key}" as a value. DNNX answer is better. –  steenslag Jan 31 '11 at 13:41
    
Yeah, don't do this! –  glenn mcdonald Jan 31 '11 at 13:45
    
@steenslag: Oh yes, I never thought this way. Very true. I agree DNNX's answer is more suitable. Thanks for pointing this out :) –  intellidiot Feb 1 '11 at 4:19
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val = h.has_key?("key") ? h['key'] : "No element present"
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you can use the has_key? method instead

val = h.has_key?('key') ? h['key'] : "No element present"
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I always found key? clearer (and shorter, obviously) than has_key?. Aliases for the same method... –  glenn mcdonald Jan 31 '11 at 13:51
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irb(main):001:0> h = Hash.new('No element present')
=> {}
irb(main):002:0> h[1]
=> "No element present"
irb(main):003:0> h[1] = nil
=> nil
irb(main):004:0> h[1]
=> nil
irb(main):005:0> h[2]
=> "No element present"
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+1 to this answer :) –  intellidiot Feb 1 '11 at 4:19
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