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I have a perl variable like this. How can i access the inlying properties (like '706')?

my @config = [
        {
        'x' => [ 565, 706 ],
        'y' => [ 122 ],
        'z' => 34,
        'za' => 59,
    }
];

EDIT: print Dumper($config[0]); yields : $VAR1 = undef;

Looks like i get acces using $config[0][0]->{x}[1];. Why do i have to use [0][0] (one is clear, but he ssecond...)?

EDIT2: I am sorry for changing the data structure, but the definition which was given to me changed.

share|improve this question
    
Not sure that the comma after 59 is really correct. – Benoit Jan 31 '11 at 13:04
    
no the comma seems to be no problem – Thariama Jan 31 '11 at 13:08
2  
One of the nice things about Perl is that the closing comma is optional. Which means that you can leave it there and not have to worry about adding it when you need to add more items. – Dave Cross Jan 31 '11 at 13:11
4  
If you had "use warnings" turned on then Perl would tell you why $config[0] is undef. $config[0] is the first element from the array @config. But you don't have an array called @config, you have an array reference in $config. So you need to use $config->[0]. – Dave Cross Jan 31 '11 at 13:13
1  
Sorry, I mean "use strict". – Dave Cross Jan 31 '11 at 13:18
up vote 3 down vote accepted

[EDIT: Follow the shifting problem definition.]

Given:

my @config = ( 
  [
    { # NB: insertion order ≠ traversal order
        "x"  => [ 565, 706 ],
        "y"  => [ 122 ],
        "z"  => 34,
        "za" => 59,
    },
  ],
);

Then this will do it:

# choice §1
print $config[0][0]{"x"}[-1];   # get 1ˢᵗ row’s xᵗʰ row’s last element

understanding of course that that is merely syntactic sugar for:

# choice §2
print $config[0]->[0]->{"x"}->[-1];   # get 1ˢᵗ row’s xᵗʰ row’s last element

and that that is just syntactic sugar for:

# choice §3
print ${ $config[0] }[0]->{"x"}->[-1];   # get 1ˢᵗ row’s xᵗʰ row’s last element

which in turn is just syntactic sugar for:

# choice §4
print ${ ${ $config[0] }[0] }{"x"}->[-1];   # get 1ˢᵗ row’s xᵗʰ row’s last element

which again is syntactic sugar for:

# choice §5
print ${ ${ ${ $config[0] }[0] }{"x"}}[-1];   # get 1ˢᵗ row’s xᵗʰ row’s last element

and that, of course, is equivalent to:

# choice §6
print ${ ${ ${ $config[0] }[0] }{"x"} }[ $#{ ${ ${ $config[0] }[0] }{"x"} } ];   # get 1ˢᵗ row’s xᵗʰ row’s last element
share|improve this answer
    
this prints out nothing :( – Thariama Jan 31 '11 at 12:55
    
You need $config->[0]{"x"}[-1]. The difference between $config[0] and $config->[0] is important. – Dave Cross Jan 31 '11 at 13:16
1  
@Thariama: It now matches your current (but not previous) problem definition. I have included your data structure in my answer in case you go changing it again. – tchrist Jan 31 '11 at 14:40
1  
@daveorg: Not any more I don’t. She changed her variable from a scalar to an array. – tchrist Jan 31 '11 at 14:41
    
@tchrist: I think that at least part of the problem here is that the OP doesn't actually know what data structure she has :-) – Dave Cross Jan 31 '11 at 15:46

For the answer to this (and much, much more) you need the Perl Data Structures Cookbook.

share|improve this answer
    
and the answer is? – Thariama Jan 31 '11 at 12:57
    
Did you read the cookbook? – Dave Cross Jan 31 '11 at 13:17
    
i red part of it, +1 for your helpfull hints – Thariama Jan 31 '11 at 13:59
2  
“Nice reference!”, quoth the author. – tchrist Jan 31 '11 at 14:35

Your variable is equivalent to :

my $config = [
    'x', [ 565, 706 ],
    'y', [ 122 ],
    'z', 34,
    'za', 59,
];

So if you want to get the 706, you can do:

print $config->[1][1];

Updated according to new data in the question

With the updated question, you can access now by :

say $config->[0]{x}[1];

New update according to new data structure

According to the last updated data structure you provide:

my @config = [
        {
        'x' => [ 565, 706 ],
        'y' => [ 122 ],
        'z' => 34,
        'za' => 59,
    }
];

you assign an anonymous array [...] that contains itself a hash {...} to an array @config, this will populate the first element of @config with the anonymous array

say Dumper \@config;

$VAR1 = [
          [
            {
              'y' => [
                       122
                     ],
              'za' => 59,
              'x' => [
                       565,
                       706
                     ],
              'z' => 34
            }
          ]
        ];
say $config[0][0]{x}[1];  #prints 706

I think you want to do either:

my $config = [
        {
        'x' => [ 565, 706 ],
        'y' => [ 122 ],
        'z' => 34,
        'za' => 59,
    }
];
say $config->[0]{x}[1]; #prints 706



my @config = (
        {
        'x' => [ 565, 706 ],
        'y' => [ 122 ],
        'z' => 34,
        'za' => 59,
    }
);
say $config[0]{x}[1];  #prints 706
share|improve this answer
    
+1 thanks for your answer – Thariama Jan 31 '11 at 15:56
    
I much prefer the output of Dumpvalue over that of Data::Dumper. – tchrist Jan 31 '11 at 15:57

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