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Context: C++ Consider the example below

class TestClass
{
private:
    int A[];
    int *B;

public:
    TestClass();
};

TestClass::TestClass()
{
    A = 0; // Fails due to error: incompatible types in assignment of `int' to `int[0u]'
    B = 0; // Passes
}

A = 0 fails but B = 0 succeeds. What's the catch? What exactly is A? A constant pointer? How do I initialize it then?

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1  
Consider using an std::vector or a boost::array instead. – Björn Pollex Jan 31 '11 at 13:22
    
Hey thanks but I'm just interested to know what's going on internally – EFreak Jan 31 '11 at 13:24
    
See my answer, and the error that Comeau shows! – Nawaz Jan 31 '11 at 13:26
    
yeah .. guess it's a bug in g++. It chewed my head for a while. – EFreak Jan 31 '11 at 13:40
    
it's not a bug in g++; after all it gives error if you compile it with -pedantic option. :-) – Nawaz Jan 31 '11 at 14:30
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The only difference between them is that int A[] in a class would not compile, and should not compile!

Comeau C++ compiler gives this error:

"ComeauTest.c", line 4: error:   
incomplete type is not allowed   
      int A[];
          ^ 

Wikipedia says,

Comeau C/C++ has been regarded as the most standards-conformant C++ compiler.

I therefore would suggest : Don't write such code even if your compiler compiles it.

share|improve this answer
    
:) cool ! I am using g++. Ok so I guess this is a bogus declaration. – EFreak Jan 31 '11 at 13:38
2  
@EFreak : Are you using any options? Compile it as g++ -pedantic filename.cpp .. and tell me the result. I'm curious :-) – Nawaz Jan 31 '11 at 13:40
1  
test.cpp:5: error: ISO C++ forbids zero-size array `A'. Thank you very much ! – EFreak Jan 31 '11 at 13:44
    
@EFreak: I was expecting that error. Thanks for confirming. :-) – Nawaz Jan 31 '11 at 13:47

The question "what is the difference between int* and int[]?" is a less trivial question than most people will think of: it depends on where it is used.

In a declaration, like extern int a[]; it means that somewhere there is an array called a, for which the size is unknown here. In a definition with aggregate initialization, like int a[] = { 1, 2, 3 }; it means an array of a size I, as programmer, don't want to calculate and you, compiler, have to interpret from the initialization. In a definition without initialization, it is an error, as you cannot define an array of an unknown size. In a function declaration (and/or) definition, it is exactly equivalent to int*, the language specifies that when processing the types of the arguments for functions, arrays are converted into pointers to the contained type.

In your particular case, as declaration of members of a class, int a[]; is an error, as you are declaring a member of an incomplete type. If you add a size there, as in int a[10] then it becomes the declaration of an array of type int and size 10, and that will reserve space for 10 int inside each object of the class. While on the other hand, int *b will only reserve space for a pointer to integers in the class.

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A[] is an array with its size undefined. You need to declare it like this:

int A[SIZE];

then initialize it like this:

A[0] = 0, A[1] = 5,

etc

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A is an array, and in C++ you need to specify the array size when you define the variable itself i.e. you need to do something like int A[10]. Then you can access individual elements using A[0], A[1] etc. B is a pointer, so doing B=0; sets the pointer to NULL. If you don't want to specify the size at compile time, but still want array like syntax you can use std::vector<int>.

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Thanks Asha! But if I don't do that. How does the compiler interpret it is my question. If itr allows a declaration then probably it should also allow a definition to exist. Correct me if I am wrong. – EFreak Jan 31 '11 at 13:23

int A[] is an memory range inside the class instance, where int *B is a pointer that you may or may not initialize later.

so

A=0 means that you want to change a pointer that cannot be changed,

where

B=0 means that you are changing a pointer to point to 0x00000000

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What is a memory range? If C++ allows empty declarations like this, there also should be a way to initialize that I guess. (Just for curiosity) – EFreak Jan 31 '11 at 13:21
1  
I guess that falls into the area 'not all possible things in c++ are really useful' – Daniel Mošmondor Jan 31 '11 at 13:39

The code snapshot you have there should not compile since A[] is effectively a zero sized array, thus an incomplete type, which is not allowed in class specifications. For eg. Visual Studio fails to compile this with these errors:

1>...\test.h(4) : warning C4200: nonstandard extension used : zero-sized array in struct/union 1>
Cannot generate copy-ctor or copy-assignment operator when UDT contains a zero-sized array 1>...\test.h(5) : error C2229: class 'TestClass' has an illegal zero-sized array

To initialize and use A[] you must declare it as static and initialize it with file scope like this:

class TestClass
{
private:
    static int A[];
    int *B;

public:
    TestClass();
};

TestClass::TestClass()
{
    //A = 0;  Yes this is wrong, see bellow.
    B = 0; // Passes
}

int TestClass::A[] = {1,2,3};

As for A = 0 this is wrong too and Visual Studio will complain with this error, which is self explanatory:

1>..\test.h(13) : error C2440: '=' : cannot convert from 'int' to 'int []' 1> There are no conversions to array types, although there are conversions to references or pointers to arrays.

LE: Also see David Rodríguez - dribeas answer for a complete interpretation of zero sized arrays.

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Thanks for the help :) – EFreak Jan 31 '11 at 13:41

long answer short, A is of type array and B is of type pointer to int.

A[] initializes an array of zero size, which you cannot assign a value to.

Btw, you can ask C++ yourself with:

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

using namespace std;

class TestClass{
  private:
    int A[];
    int* B;
  public:
    TestClass();
};

TestClass::TestClass(){
  cout<<"Type A: "<<typeid(A).name()<<endl;
  cout<<"Type B: "<<typeid(B).name()<<endl;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv){
  TestClass A;

  return 0;
}
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