Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code inside a function:

stored_blocks = {}
def replace_blocks(m):
    block = m.group(0)
    block_hash = sha1(block)
    stored_blocks[block_hash] = block
    return '{{{%s}}}' % block_hash

num_converted = 0
def convert_variables(m):
    name = m.group(1)
    num_converted += 1
    return '<%%= %s %%>' % name

fixed = MATCH_DECLARE_NEW.sub('', template)
fixed = MATCH_PYTHON_BLOCK.sub(replace_blocks, fixed)
fixed = MATCH_FORMAT.sub(convert_variables, fixed)

Adding elements to stored_blocks works fine, but I cannot increase num_converted in the second subfunction:

UnboundLocalError: local variable 'num_converted' referenced before assignment

I could use global but global variables are ugly and I really don't need that variable to be global at all.

So I'm curious how I can write to a variable in the parent function's scope. nonlocal num_converted would probably do the job, but I need a solution that works with Python 2.x.

share|improve this question
4  
Contrary to somewhat popular belief (judging by this kind of questions) def is not the only keyword that defines a namespace: there is also class. –  Jochen Ritzel Jan 31 '11 at 14:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 36 down vote accepted

Turn num_converted into a single-element array.

num_converted = [0]
def convert_variables(m):
    name = m.group(1)
    num_converted[0] += 1
    return '<%%= %s %%>' % name
share|improve this answer
3  
Can you explain why that is necessary? I would have expected to OPs code to work. –  Björn Pollex Jan 31 '11 at 13:47
21  
Because Python's scoping rules are demented. The presence of the += assignment operator marks the target, num_converted, as local to the enclosing function's scope, and there is no sound way in Python 2.x to access just one scoping level out from there. Only the global keyword can lift variable references out of the current scope, and it takes you straight to the top. –  Marcelo Cantos Jan 31 '11 at 13:51
2  
Very clever! But it's really dumb of Python to make that necessary –  acjay Jun 6 '12 at 21:44
4  
This is not clever, this is actually pretty bad code. There are classes (see comment under the question). This version uses a global variable which you should always avoid. Not using global doesn't mean you don't have a global variable. –  schlamar Jul 19 '12 at 12:16
3  
@schlamar: The variable in question isn't global in any sense of the word. The OP's opening sentence stipulates that the entire block of code they presented is inside a function. –  Marcelo Cantos Jul 4 '13 at 3:32

(see below for the edited answer)

You can use something like:

def convert_variables(m):
    name = m.group(1)
    convert_variables.num_converted += 1
    return '<%%= %s %%>' % name

convert_variables.num_converted = 0

This way, num_converted works as a C-like "static" variable of the convert_variable method


(edited)

def convert_variables(m):
    name = m.group(1)
    convert_variables.num_converted = convert_variables.__dict__.get("num_converted", 0) + 1
    return '<%%= %s %%>' % name

This way, you don't need to initialize the counter in the main procedure.

share|improve this answer
2  
Right. And note that you must create the attribute convert_variables.num_converted after defining the function, though it looks strange to do so. –  Marc van Leeuwen Sep 21 '13 at 17:51
    
@PabloG most satisfying answer to this question, apart from nonlocal in 3.x; using mutable type [] is cheap workaround. –  user2290820 Oct 17 '13 at 21:15

What about using a class instance to hold the state? You instantiate a class and pass instance methods to subs and those functions would have a reference to self...

share|improve this answer
4  
Sounds a bit overkillish and like a solution coming from a Java programmer. ;p –  ThiefMaster Jan 31 '11 at 13:55
    
hey, but it's clean! ;) –  Seb Jan 31 '11 at 14:12
1  
@ThiefMaster Why is this overkill? If you want access to the parent scope you should use a class in Python. –  schlamar Jul 19 '12 at 12:20

Using the global keyword is fine. If you write:

num_converted = 0
def convert_variables(m):
    global num_converted
    name = m.group(1)
    num_converted += 1
    return '<%%= %s %%>' % name

... num_converted doesn't become a "global variable" (i.e. it doesn't become visible in any other unexpected places), it just means it can be modified inside convert_variables. That seems to be exactly what you want.

To put it another way, num_converted is already a global variable. All the global num_converted syntax does is tell Python "inside this function, don't create a local num_converted variable, instead, use the existing global one.

share|improve this answer
1  
global in 2.x works pretty much how nonlocal does in 3.x. –  Daniel Roseman Jan 31 '11 at 13:49
    
"To put it another way, num_converted is already a global variable" - my code is running inside a function.. so it's currently not global. –  ThiefMaster Jan 31 '11 at 13:53
2  
Ah, I haden't paid attention to the "inside a function" part, sorry - in that case, Marcelo's length-one-list may be a better (but ugly) solution. –  Emile Jan 31 '11 at 13:55

I have couple of remarks.

First, one application for such nested functions comes up when dealing with raw callbacks, as are used in libraries like xml.parsers.expat. (That the library authors chose this approach may be objectionable, but ... there are reasons to use it nonetheless.)

Second: within a class, there are much nicer alternatives to the array (num_converted[0]). I suppose this is what Sebastjan was talking about.

class MainClass:
    _num_converted = 0
    def outer_method( self ):
        def convert_variables(m):
            name = m.group(1)
            self._num_converted += 1
            return '<%%= %s %%>' % name

It's still odd enough to merit a comment in the code... But the variable is at least local to the class.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, welcome to Stack Overflow - but posting a "remark" as an answer is not really something you can do here. We have comments for this (however, you need some rep to post them - but don't post answers just because you do not have enough rep for a comment yet) –  ThiefMaster Mar 27 '13 at 13:12
4  
Hi, You're also welcome! I don't understand your remark, or several of the terms you use. And I'm a busy man, just trying to be helpful! –  Steve White Mar 27 '13 at 13:29
    
No problem - have a look at stackoverflow.com/about though. While being helpful is always appreciated a comment that is posted will eventually be deleted no matter how good it is. –  ThiefMaster Mar 27 '13 at 13:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.