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HI,

I have a collection of strings eg "test (9)" "test (7)" "test (5)" "test (3)"

I want to loop use a foreach loop to iterate and find the lowest number I have a regex to extract the number out of each string... I need to loop through all items (which are in the format as in my example above) and find the lowest number...?

foreach (SPListItem item in items)

{

string item = (String)item["Title"];

string itemNumberString = Regex.Match(UniqueCounteryparty, @"\d+").Value;


}
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2  
you're question being ... –  Frederik Gheysels Jan 31 '11 at 14:04
    
Have you considered using class to store number separately or is it impossible in your scenario? –  Tx3 Jan 31 '11 at 14:06
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm initializing the variable "test" below using array initialization syntax for demo purposes since I'm assuming you have a collection already populated with the strings you need.

  string[] tests = new string[] { "test(1)", "test(2)", "test(3)" };
  int minimum = int.MaxValue;

  foreach(string test in tests)
  {
    int num = ExtractNumber(test);
    if (num < minimum)
      minimum = num;
  }

  //now you have minimum that hold the minimum;

"ExtractNumber" is your function that extracts the number from the string

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That's slightly faster than @Jakub's answer because it avoids unnecessary assignments. I also find it easier to understand. –  ssg Jan 31 '11 at 14:22
    
@ssg, yes, that was the point on both counts. I like the use of Math.Min but unless one is familiar with that function it's not as readable. And seeing the OP's question I thought it best to keep it simple. –  Shiv Kumar Jan 31 '11 at 14:31
    
@ssg - I'm doing one assignment per item - Shiv is doing at least one per item. I wouldn't judge the performance since you don't know what optimizations the compiler will come up with. The best way is to test it. –  Jakub Konecki Jan 31 '11 at 15:09
    
@Jakub, I agree that the best way is to test. I still think Shiv's code is more expressive though. –  ssg Jan 31 '11 at 17:34
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int minValue = int.MaxValue;

foreach(string s in strings)
    minValue = Math.Min(minValue, ExtractNumberMethod(s));
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yeah ... that's what is asked for ... –  Stefan Steinegger Jan 31 '11 at 14:17
    
if the strings are ("test 10", "test 8", "test 11) it will say result in test 11 being the lowest when in fact it is test 8 in the collection –  van Jan 31 '11 at 15:20
    
@nav - Your extract number method may return not what you expect - debug it. –  Jakub Konecki Jan 31 '11 at 15:44
    
thanks Jakub but i was referring to my understanding of your code.. –  van Jan 31 '11 at 16:00
    
@nav - why do you think my code will return 11 as the lowest number out of {10, 8, 11}? –  Jakub Konecki Jan 31 '11 at 16:05
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Here is the obligatory LINQ solution:

IEnumerable<int> numbers()
{
  foreach (SPListItem item in items)
  {
    string item = (String)item["Title"];
    string itemNumberString = Regex.Match(UniqueCounteryparty, @"\d+").Value;
    yield int.Parse(itemNumberString);
  }
}   
int min = numbers().Min();
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it's tagged .Net 2.0 ! –  Steve B Jan 31 '11 at 19:49
    
@Steve, why on earth would that be an excuse not to show variations to influence, to teach, maybe to advertise the benefits of upgrading? What harm could I possible cause by sharing my own exercise on the matter and help people searching for the same answer but not for version 2.0? What got you upset so much? Is that blasphemous, not to abide by terms of OP and stick to the correct major and minor versions? Am I polluting Stackoverflow DB? Already given correct answers am I inflating the knowledge universe? Lowering the entropy? Stating the obvious? –  ssg Jan 31 '11 at 23:32
    
I though you missed the tag. Please note that I didn't vote down... it was only a precision. Maybe you can prefix your message with something like "if you can upgrade to 3.5", or "i know you are on 2.0, but this may be helpful" ... it can prevent misunderstanding like this –  Steve B Feb 1 '11 at 8:25
    
I agree. Getting easy on exclamation marks also helps understanding each other. –  ssg Feb 1 '11 at 9:40
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You can simply rely on the base class library methods :

A sample to illustrate the two methods :

using System;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {

        private static void Method2(string[] strings)
        {
            int[] ints = new int[strings.Length];

            for (int i = 0; i < strings.Length; i++)
            {
                ints[i] = Extract(strings[i]);
            }

            Array.Sort<int>(ints);

            foreach (int i in ints)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(i);
            }

            Console.WriteLine("The smallest is {0}", ints[0]);
        }

        private static void Method1(string[] strings)
        {
            List<int> result = new List<int>();
            foreach (string s in strings)
            {
                int value = Extract(s);
                result.Add(value);
            }
            result.Sort();

            foreach (int i in result)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(i);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("The smallest is {0}", result[0]);
        }
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string[] strings  = new string[6];

            strings[0] = "test (9)";
            strings[1] = "test (4)";
            strings[2] = "test (7)";
            strings[3] = "test (1)";
            strings[4] = "test (2)";
            strings[5] = "test (8)";

            Console.WriteLine("\nMethod1 :");
            Method1(strings);

            Console.WriteLine("\nMethod2 :");

            Method2(strings);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        private static int Extract(string s)
        {
            // simply extract the digits
            return Convert.ToInt32(Regex.Match(s, @"\d+").Value);
        }
    }
}
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