Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have a fairly large rails application and I have started this output in our unicorn.log:

#:0xc644248>#:0xc644248>#:0xc4f06e4>#:0xc4f06e4>#:0xca481b4>#:0xca481b4>#:0xc53f604>#:0xc53f604>#:0xcd7a60c>#:0xcd7a60c>#:0xc5df2f8>#:0xc5df2f8>#:0xc69fd00>#:0xc69fd00>#:0xc560ae8>#:0xc560ae8>

It seems to me like there probably is a stray Kernel.puts method call somewhere, but I've been searching for hours and can't find it.

Anyone have tips for tracking something like this down?

share|improve this question
    
Because the output does not contain any newlines, I am starting to think this is a call to print, not puts. –  Michael Guterl Jan 31 '11 at 18:24
    
This could also be a call to pp, which does not seem to go through print or puts –  Michael Guterl Jan 31 '11 at 18:33
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Have you checked for display? That's another method that prints stuff out.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Andrew, this was the issue. –  Michael Guterl Feb 1 '11 at 13:04
add comment

This is what I use, it's similar to Banang's answer but maybe even simpler. Do a grep from the directory like so:

grep -rn 'puts' .

Sure it searches everything but you can run it in whatever directory you want to limit that. That should give you the file and line number you need. You can fine tune the search criteria as you wish.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You could go over all the files and search for any calls to Kernel.puts, like so:

find -iname "*.rb" | xargs grep -iR 'Kernel.puts'

However, in terms of neatness (and effectiveness), I would probably go for the solution provided by Jeff Paquette.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You could monkey patch puts, and raise an exception when it's called. You could even fine tune that with a regexp match on your output string (which looks like a recursive object dump).

module Kernel
  def puts (s)
    raise "puts called, check the backtrace for the source" if s =~ /#:[a-z0-9]>*/
  end
end

It could also be that it's not a call to puts, but rather #inspect.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1. This is a very nice solution. –  Mia Clarke Jan 31 '11 at 14:34
    
I have been trying to use this solution with no luck. I've been trying to modify it, here is where I am at: gist.github.com/804506 –  Michael Guterl Jan 31 '11 at 18:12
    
What issues are you having? Is your version not getting invoked? –  Jeff Paquette Jan 31 '11 at 18:41
    
The patch seems to work as I can trigger it from the console with puts Class.singleton_class, but it isn't hitting on the instance that hits the log. –  Michael Guterl Jan 31 '11 at 19:10
    
Have you tried monkeypatching #inspect? –  Jeff Paquette Jan 31 '11 at 19:43
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.