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Ok, this is my first C program since "hello wolrd" and I need some help with realloc. I have a dynamic array defined as a global variable.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <errno.h>

double *close = NULL;
unsigned int closesize = 0;

And I want to increase the array in a method. But I get a seg fault error. I have tried it like this:

  void addInputParamReal(
     OCIExtProcContext *ctx
    //,unsigned int paramIndex
    //,OCINumber *value
    ,double value
  )
  {
    double dtemp;
    double **myclose = &close; // last try, make a pointer to my outside array
    //OCINumberToDouble(ctx,value,&dtemp);
    dtemp = 12.4; //just now

    //Not good
    *myclose = (double *) realloc (*myclose,(closesize+1) * sizeof(double));
    close[closesize++] = dtemp;
  }

Can you please help me out? Thanks Chris

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3  
Note: increasing your array size by 1 each time is incredibly inefficient. Typical approach is to e.g. double the size when current capacity is exceeded. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 31 '11 at 16:28
1  
Your code looks ok; the double pointer is unnecessary. However, ti depends heavily on whether closesize has been affected outside of this function. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 31 '11 at 16:30
    
The problem is, that I call this method from oracles extproc interface. I do not know the size at runtime and I can not assign an array. So I have to add the elements one by one. A local variable disapears after each call (yeah should be that way) so I have to "remember" the values outside. closesize will not be affected from other methods than "addInputParamReal". –  christian Jan 31 '11 at 16:43
1  
arrrgh ... the variable must not be named close ... now I renamed it and it is working. ... but my vi do not highlight "close" :-) –  christian Jan 31 '11 at 17:22
1  
@christian: You should add that as an answer. Don't you love a single, flat namespace? :) Did you also realize there's a system API named close and that's the name conflict? –  Fred Nurk Jan 31 '11 at 18:03

3 Answers 3

Extending by 1 every time is going to be somewhat inefficient. Usually, you'd extend by a chunk (either fixed size or a percentage of the current size), and then keep track of the physical size (closesize) separately from the array index (call it closeindex):

if (closeindex == closesize)
{
  double *tmp = realloc(close, sizeof *tmp * (closesize + EXTENT));
  if (tmp)
  {
    close = tmp;
    closesize += EXTENT;
  }
  else
  {
    // panic
  }
}
close[closeindex++] = ...;

You can figure out a way to make this read a little more elegantly, I'm sure.

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It's often even better to multiply the existing size by a constant, rather than add a constant, since that reduces the number of memory allocations required from O(n) to O(log n). –  caf Jan 31 '11 at 23:54
    
@caf: so for a first shot it was not important to me how efficient it is. But now it is working an I have a question regarding the mentioned increase by multiply: Do you decrease at the end? I mean if you know the Array have 3209 elements but you have allocated mem for 6400? The thing is, I pass my array to some 3rd party lib and there for (I assume) it should have exact as much mem as much elements are needed –  christian Feb 2 '11 at 13:33
    
@christian: It depends on the application - how long the allocation will be around for, how much memory it is likely to waste. The library you pass it to has no way of telling if the array is "really" longer than you say it is. –  caf Feb 2 '11 at 20:45
    
@caf: I see. Just because this mem stuff is new to me (coming from languages like java and c#). If I do a sizeof(myArray) / sizeof(double) I will receive nr of elements I have mem allocated for, right? If so, do the elements from 3210 to 6400 just contain garbage or NULL? –  christian Feb 3 '11 at 10:40
    
@christian: If myArray is a pointer, then sizeof(myArray) returns the size of the pointer - not of the memory that it points to, so that expression will not return the number of elements allocated with malloc(). There is no standard way to retrieve that number from the pointer - if you need it, you must keep it in another variable (ideally, of type size_t). Memory allocated by malloc() but not yet stored to has an indeterminate value (just like an uninitialised variable). –  caf Feb 3 '11 at 10:46

Some reallocs implementations may let you pass in an initial starting NULL and some may not. On linux, for example, a NULL should be allowed for example but I don't believe that's an absolute truth everywhere. You should try, in the beginning of your program, to initialize it using a regular malloc() call first.

Everyone else is correct, though, resizing by 1 is very inefficient. Knowing how your data is going to grow, roughly, is very important. If nothing else, double the size every time rather than increment by one.

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1  
All standard-conforming C (and C++) implementations will allow NULL to be passed to realloc. –  eq- Jan 31 '11 at 17:20
    
The standard says that realloc will act just like malloc when passed a null pointer. –  Null Set Jan 31 '11 at 17:22
    
realloc(NULL,...) is defined by the language standard to work exactly the same as malloc(). –  John Bode Jan 31 '11 at 17:23

As Fred Nurk sugessted in the comments above, I add this as answer:

The variable must not be named close ... now I renamed it and it is working. ... but my vi do not highlight "close" :-)

--edit1:
what I have done now is:

  void addInputParamReal(
     OCIExtProcContext *ctx
    ,OCINumber *value
  )
  {
    // do we need more mem?
    if (bar1size==0)
    {
      bar1close = (TA_Real *) malloc(initsize * sizeof(TA_Real));
      bar1size=initsize;
    }
    else if (bar1size<bar1idx || bar1size == 65536)
    {
      raise_exception(ctx,__LINE__,"addInputParamReal,memory allocation failed");
      return;
    }
    else if (bar1size==bar1idx)
    {
      bar1close = (TA_Real *) realloc (bar1close, (bar1idx*2) * sizeof(TA_Real));
      bar1size = bar1idx*2;
    }

    //assign value
    double dtemp;
    OCINumberToDouble(ctx,value,&dtemp);
    bar1close[bar1idx++] = (TA_Real) dtemp;
  }
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