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In XSL is function like CONTAIN, that if i have number with simbol like "123112'+:" then doesn't take it.

to be more precise:

<Number>111111</Number>
<Number>123123+</Number>
<Number>222222</Number>
<Number>222222+</Number>

answer:

111111
222222

I'm stuck with xslt 1.0 version

share|improve this question
    
@Petras: Your question is not clear. Do you want to select those Number elements not having a value like this pattern "######+"? –  user357812 Jan 31 '11 at 16:32
    
Hem. not(contains(Number, '+')). Or pattern is more specific? –  Flack Jan 31 '11 at 16:37
    
if we haven't only number element than don't take it. If 2020,we will take it, but if 2020+, we don't. –  Petras Jan 31 '11 at 16:40
    
@Petras, sorry, but I'm lost in translation. Could you please rephrase "if we haven't only number element than don't take it"? –  Flack Jan 31 '11 at 16:51
    
@Alejandro. sorry for that. I mean if we have only numbers then we show it. If we have number with symbols like +,?(for example:21231+) then we don't show it –  Petras Jan 31 '11 at 18:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Another approach, exploiting number to boolean conversion.

<xsl:stylesheet
    version="1.0"
    xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output method="text"/>

    <xsl:template match="/*">
        <xsl:apply-templates select="Number[boolean(number()) or . = 0]"/>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="Number">
        <xsl:value-of select="."/>
        <xsl:text>&#xA;</xsl:text>
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

With input:

<Numbers>
    <Number>111111</Number>
    <Number>123123+</Number>
    <Number>222222</Number>
    <Number>222222+</Number>
</Numbers>

Correct result:

111111
222222

Quoting the spec:

The boolean function converts its argument to a boolean as follows: a number is true if and only if it is neither positive or negative zero nor NaN

share|improve this answer
    
@Flack: this would not show the number 0. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jan 31 '11 at 20:12
    
@Dimitre, as I mentioned. "if zeros are unsignifican" –  Flack Jan 31 '11 at 20:33
    
@Flack: A zero may be insignificant if it is in a left-starting group of zeroes that precede other digits before the decimal point or if the zero is in a right-ending groups of zeroes that are after the decimal point. Therefore, the number 0 is not an insignificant zero. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jan 31 '11 at 20:42
    
@Dimitre, yeah, it's a weak wording. What I meant "if elems with value 0" aren't significant. –  Flack Jan 31 '11 at 20:53
    
@Flack: then you could fix the expression: boolean(number()) or . = 0 –  Dimitre Novatchev Jan 31 '11 at 21:10

Use the following XPath to select all the nodes that contains numbers. It will skip the ones with a plus sign in them.

Number[number(.)=number(.)]

Should work with XSLT 1.0

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Correct semantic (instance of number data type). Do note that Number[.=number()] it's enough for XPath 1.0 . In Xpath 2.0 we would use instance of operator. –  user357812 Jan 31 '11 at 19:03
    
can i use this method with value-of select:<xsl:value-of select="normalize-space(Number[number(.)=number(.)])"/> –  Petras Jan 31 '11 at 19:04
    
Ok. I keep it in mind. thank you for answer –  Petras Feb 1 '11 at 6:51
    
@Alejandro - I hadn't considered the contraction to .=number() - that's useful to know. Sadly I'm stuck with XPath 1.0 in most of my work at the moment. –  alergy Feb 2 '11 at 10:42

Yet another solution :)

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="Number[not(.*.+1)]"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when this transformation is applied on the following XML document:

<t>
    <Number>111111</Number>
    <Number>123123+</Number>
    <Number>222222</Number>
    <Number>222222+</Number>
</t>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<t>
  <Number>111111</Number>
  <Number>222222</Number>
</t>

Explanation: All Number elements for wich the expression:

not(.*.+1)

is true() are filtered out by the simple template rule:

 <xsl:template match="Number[not(.*.+1)]"/>

This is possible only if the string value of the Number element cannot be converted to a number. In this case .*.+1 evaluates to NaN and boolean(NaN) is false() by definition.

If the string value of the Number element can be converted to a number $num, then the above expression is equivalent to:

not($num*$num+1)

and $num*$num+1 >= 1 for any number $num, so, boolean(.*.+1) in this case is always true().

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for answer Dimiatre. –  Petras Feb 2 '11 at 6:33

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