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I have a RESTful web service that responds to /user/{userId} with a marshalled XML representation of a User domain object (using JAXB). What's an appropriate way of communicating back to the client additional details about their request, particularly if it doesn't return the information they're expecting? In a non-distributed Java application, you might have a catch block that deals with data access, or security exceptions. In the event that /user/{userId} doesn't return anything (e.g. the web services persistence mechanism isn't working, there is a security restriction, etc...) how do I include meaningful information in the response to the client?

I don't think DTOs are what I need because I'm not looking for different representations of a domain object. Rather, I'm looking for information about what happened during the request that may have prevented it from returning the information the client expected. Would it be appropriate to enclose the domain object within some kind of ResponseObject that holds the relevant metadata? The downside to this approach is that I'd rather not have my service layer interfaces all have ResponseObject as their return type because I may very well provide a non-RESTful implementation that doesn't have the same metadata requirements.

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What's an appropriate way of communicating back to the client additional details about their request, particularly if it doesn't return the information they're expecting.

In the event that /user/{userId} doesn't return anything (e.g. the web services persistence mechanism isn't working, there is a security restriction, etc...) how do I include meaningful information in the response to the client?

This is what the HTTP Status Code is used for in a RESTful service.

To indicate that a requested userId doesn't correspond to an actual user, you can return a 404 Not Found.

To indicate an internal error within your application (such as not being able to connect to the database), you can return 500 Internal Server Error.

The option you are describing - wrapping your returns in a ResponseObject which then includes the true "response status" - sounds an awful lot like SOAP.

The beauty of REST, or at least what people claim, is that you can use the already-existing HTTP response status code to model almost all statuses of your actual response.

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+1 for "sounds an awful lot like SOAP". Not doing this the SOAP way is exactly what makes REST appealing, and I don't want to bend the protocol backwards. I'm personally a proponent of the HTTP status code approach, but was just wondering about alternatives. – Fil Jan 31 '11 at 16:39
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if you are creating a REST service, then in order to have users of the service handle your API correctly you should mention the possible response codes and when/why they'd occur in your documentation. For example, to retrieve a User call GET /users/{userId}. Possible responses are 200 with a payload of the User in XML form, or 404 if the id is not found, 500 if there is an internal server error that is not the client's fault, etc. Beyond documenting the possible responses, the rest is out of your hands - you are giving the client all the info they need. – matt b Jan 31 '11 at 16:41
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+1 This is the point of REST: the HTTP protocol already has a mechanism for handling the things you are asking about so REST specifically doesn't have any support for such things. If the user isn't found, return a 404. In case of an internal error, return 500. If your service has security around it, you might find yourself returning 401 or 403 on occasion. Request badly formatted (eg a non numeric in the userId) then return 400. – Qwerky Jan 31 '11 at 16:41

If it's really error situation (security problems, no DB connection or even user with provided ID not found), then just throw an Exception. Client receives fault and can behave according to information contained in it.

Which implementation do you use? In Apache CXF, for example, you can define exception handler and render XML for exception yourself, and there you are free to include any meta-info you like.

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I'm using Jersey at the moment, and @reverendgreen's answer below has a userful reference to Jersey's ExceptionMapper. – Fil Jan 31 '11 at 17:32

I would capture the information using exceptions, then map those exceptions to an HTTP response with the appropriate status code. You can achieve this by creating an implementation of ExceptionMapper if you're using JAX-RS, or you can subclass StatusService if you're using Restlet.

http://wikis.sun.com/display/Jersey/Overview+of+JAX-RS+1.0+Features http://wiki.restlet.org/docs_2.0/13-restlet/27-restlet/331-restlet/202-restlet.html

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An ExceptionMapper is exactly what I need. Thanks. – Fil Jan 31 '11 at 16:53

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