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if   ((prmotionCode != 'FSSAVE') || (promotionCode != 'ISSAVE') && (promotioCode == 'SOSAVE'))
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closed as too localized by Bill the Lizard Jan 31 '11 at 16:57

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9  
For starters, you misspelled 'promotion' twice. –  Moses Jan 31 '11 at 16:29
    
What are you trying to do? What is the expected output? Are you having syntax errors? We need more info to be able to help you =) –  Ian Jan 31 '11 at 16:30
2  
Answer: There is nothing wrong with it. I am certain that all three variables are being evaluated properly (undefined in 2 out of three cases). Either that, or you're missing six or seven parentheses. –  Stephen Jan 31 '11 at 16:30
    
Check your spelling before posting ;) –  sparkyfied Jan 31 '11 at 16:31
    
Somebody needs to work a good Buffy allusion into an answer. –  Pointy Jan 31 '11 at 16:33
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11 Answers

You spelled promotionCode wrong 2 out of 3 times.

Edit: using a Javascript debugger like Firebug will let you trace through your code and get a better idea of where the problem is happening and what it is. You might also want to try an IDE with Javascript support, as it might be able to detect such problems.

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1  
first one: missing an o. second one: ok. 3rd one: missing the n. Pretty bad... –  Marc B Jan 31 '11 at 16:29
3  
wow - +8, that is easy money ! –  jAndy Jan 31 '11 at 16:31
2  
Thanks I'm just learning, looks like I have a long way to go!! –  xander Jan 31 '11 at 16:39
    
@jAndy When this question gets deleted, people will lose this "reputation" during the next rep-recalc. –  HoLyVieR Jan 31 '11 at 19:19
1  
@xander An IDE (such as Aptana - aptana.com) can display these problems as you're writing your code. –  Kaleb Brasee Jan 31 '11 at 23:23
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You misspelled 'prmotionCode' in the first and third parts of the if. Other than that there is not enough information to answer the question.

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(promotioCode == 'SOSAVE')

Should be

(promotionCode == 'SOSAVE')

You may want to provide more information in future.

It is the last condition in the if statement

EDIT

Oh wait, you spelt it wrong twice.

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You don't use parentheses between uses of || and &&, making your purpose unclear (not necessary, but strongly disadvised..)

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Why not? better than not being 100% sure of precedence... –  Juan Mendes Jan 31 '11 at 16:36
2  
Actually testing ( x != 'foo' ) and ( x == 'bar' ) is pointless. If x is bar then no point testing if it is not foo! –  PP. Jan 31 '11 at 16:38
    
Thanks for the help. –  xander Jan 31 '11 at 16:39
    
promotioCode, promotionCode and prmotionCode might refer to different, though badly named, variables ;) –  Lucas Moeskops Jan 31 '11 at 16:40
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First of all, you seem to have some problems spelling "promotion".

But more to the point, it doesn't really make logical sense. If the promotionCode="SOSAVE", than by definition it doesn't equal any other thing. There wouldn't be a reason to test for the code to equal one thing while simultaneously not equaling a different thing; it's redundant.

Presumably you need to tell us what you actually are trying to do here.

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you missed a o in the first prmotioncode ??

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Thanks for you help. –  xander Jan 31 '11 at 16:41
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You probably want two &&. The third variable should be promotionCode. The 'n' is missing

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Thanks for you help. –  xander Jan 31 '11 at 16:41
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even if there are no typos, the condition can be reduced as

if(promotionCode != 'FSSAVE')

Whats the point pal?

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If the typos just appeared in your SO post then presumably you're asking about the boolean logic - there's an issue of precedence. Your logic boils down to 4 sets:

  1. FSSAVE
  2. ISSAVE
  3. SOSAVE
  4. {all others}

It's hard to tell exactly what it is you want, to produce, but your logic says: if it belongs to SOSAVE (include #3) or it's not in set FSSAVE (exclude #1) then do something... which boils down to: if in #2,#3,#4 - do something, which (again) boils down to: if NOT in #1 - do something. The ISSAVE clause is ignored because of operator precedence.

Your line could be re-written as:

//Using pc as prmotionCode/promotionCode/promotioCode
if (pc!='FSSAVE') {
  //Do something
}
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Obvious errors and sarcasm aside, here's a little coding help. Try using a switch instead of an if block:

switch (promotionCode) {
    case 'FSSAVE':
        // code for FSSAVE here.
        break;
    case 'ISSAVE':
        // code for ISSAVE here.
        break;
    case 'SOSAVE':
        // code for SOSAVE here.
        break;
    default:
        // code for none of the above here.
        break;
}

This will allow you to add more conditions in the future. without restructuring your code. All you have to do is add more cases. Incidentally, it will be evaluated slightly faster this way since the promotionCode variable is only evaluated a single time.

P.S. Also, you only have to try to spell promotionCode one time. Less margin for error. (sorry, couldn't resist! happy coding!)

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Do you know your operator precedence in javascript by heart?

If not then you must always put parentheses around expressions with multiple tests to make it clear to yourself and a code maintainer what precedence you were expecting.

You do know that && binds tighter than || right?

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