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Considering Java. How are these 2 different and why?

public void languageChecks() {
    Integer a = 5;
    Integer b = new Integer(5);

    change(a); // a doesn't get incremented. value is 5
    change(b); // b does. value is now 6
}

public void change(Integer a) {
    a++;
}
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1  
That is not the result I get. Are you sure? –  jjnguy Jan 31 '11 at 16:32
    
you entire code is NOP, so it can ignored by the VM just fine. –  bestsss Jan 31 '11 at 16:33
    
Are you really certain b gets changed ? if so, your JVM is broken –  nos Jan 31 '11 at 16:34
    
You are shure. I get 5 for both. Do you know why ? –  PeterMmm Jan 31 '11 at 16:36
    
b can only change if you have a buggy java implementation. Better test it again. –  josefx Jan 31 '11 at 16:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The only difference is that

Integer b = new Integer(5);

guarantees a new object is created. The first will use an instance from a cache (see Integer.valueOf()).

Both are immutable and the references to both are passed by value (as is everything in Java). So change() has no effect on either.

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Side note: adding cache for integers was somehow poor decision b/c it prevents optimizations. The compiler is never sure if the value will be a new object or not. –  bestsss Jan 31 '11 at 16:36
    
I don't see how it is worse than the alternative (always using the constructor), which demands that a new instance be created each time. –  Mark Peters Jan 31 '11 at 16:41
    
So, you mean to say that Integer a = 5 automatically creates an Integer object? –  EFreak Jan 31 '11 at 17:00
1  
@EFreak - Yes it's called auto-boxing –  Highland Mark Jan 31 '11 at 17:15

I'd always been taught a++ was just shorthand for a = a + 1 in which case a local variable is created named a and immediately thrown away when the method returns. There're no methods on Integer that change the value (it's immutable), and likewise no operations on primitive ints that change their value.

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Neither call to change() affects the values passed in, because of auto-boxing/unboxing.

public void change(Integer a) {
    // This unboxes 'a' into an int, increments it and throws it away
    a++;
}

The above code seems to imply that a++ changes the value of a, since it's an object, not a primitive. However, ++ is not overloaded by Integer, so it unboxes it to be able to apply the ++operator on its int. To me the compiler shouldn't allow this.

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But even if a were an int, a would still only be changed locally. The boxing is of no consequence here. Anyway, a actually IS incremented locally, even when it's an Integer (try printing it after that statement) –  Mark Peters Jan 31 '11 at 16:53
    
Except that the OP expected it to change, assuming so because it was a reference, not an int. –  Juan Mendes Jan 31 '11 at 16:55

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