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According to the following table for the ISO-8859-1 standard, there seems to be an entity name and an entity number associated with each reserved HTML character.

So for example, for the character é :

Entity Name : é

Entity Number : é

Similarly, for the character > :

Entity Name : >

Entity Number : >

For a given string, the HttpUtility.HtmlEncode returns an HTML encoded String, but I can't figure out how it works. Here is what I mean :

Console.WriteLine(HtmlEncode("é>"));
//Outputs é>

It seems to be using the entity number for the é character but the entity name for the > character.

So does the HtmlEncode method really work with the ISO-8859-1 standard? If it does, is there a reason why it sometimes uses the entity name and other times the entity number? More importantly, can I force it to give me the entity name reliably?

EDIT : Thanks for the answers guys. I cannot decode the string before I perform the search though. Without getting into too many details, the text is stored in a SharePoint List and the "search" is done by SharePoint itself (using a CAML query). So basically, I can't.

I'm trying to think of a way to convert the entity numbers into names, is there a function in .NET that does that? Or any other idea?

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Can you not decode the string before performing the search? –  Shiv Kumar Jan 31 '11 at 17:34
    
No unfortunately I can't. I'm querying a SharePoint List and I never have access to the String directly, which makes any manipulation impossible. –  Hugo Migneron Jan 31 '11 at 17:43
    
Can't you (have someone) fix the SharePoint list to include the plain text? Your results will stay unreliable even with the entity names. –  beetstra Jan 31 '11 at 17:58
    
@Hugo, if you can convert the entity names (as you ask) then you can surely just decode the string, no? –  Shiv Kumar Jan 31 '11 at 18:16
1  
@Hugo, the reason it sometimes use the entity name and sometimes the number is because browser support for entity names is not 100% whereas for entity numbers it is. All browsers support common entity names because they are easier to remember than the entity numbers. No matter how they are encoded, the decoded version will always revert to the original string. –  Shiv Kumar Jan 31 '11 at 18:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

That's how the method has been implemented. For some known characters it uses the corresponding entity and for everything else it uses the corresponding hex value and there is not much you could do to modify this behavior. Excerpt from the implementation of System.Net.WebUtility.HtmlEncode (as seen with reflector):

...
if (ch <= '>')
{
    switch (ch)
    {
        case '&':
        {
            output.Write("&amp;");
            continue;
        }
        case '\'':
        {
            output.Write("&#39;");
            continue;
        }
        case '"':
        {
            output.Write("&quot;");
            continue;
        }
        case '<':
        {
            output.Write("&lt;");
            continue;
        }
        case '>':
        {
            output.Write("&gt;");
            continue;
        }
    }
    output.Write(ch);
    continue;
}
if ((ch >= '\x00a0') && (ch < 'Ā'))
{
    output.Write("&#");
    output.Write(((int) ch).ToString(NumberFormatInfo.InvariantInfo));
    output.Write(';');
}
...

This being said you shouldn't care as this method will always produce valid, safe and correctly encoded HTML.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I understand why it uses the name in certain cases. However, I do care what it produces because the String i'm dealing with has not been encoded using this method (not exactly sure how it was encoded). That string is also valid and safe and I need to be able to match it (see my edit for why I can't just decode it). –  Hugo Migneron Jan 31 '11 at 17:46
    
@Hugo, if you can't decode the text this probably means that this text is not encoded in a valid way and you won't be able to perform comparisons. –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 31 '11 at 17:54
    
I can decode it. HtmlDecode("&eacute;"); returns "é" just like HtmlDecode("&#233;"); return "é". The problem is that the encode function doesn't let me choose which one I want. The HTML is valid either way. –  Hugo Migneron Jan 31 '11 at 18:12
    
@Hugo, I tought that you had an HTML encoded string which you wanted to check against some string value? So isn't (HtmlDecode(htmlEncodedValue) == "é>") working for you? As far as encoding in an HTML page is concerned you shouldn't care. –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 31 '11 at 18:17
    
it would of worked perfectly with HtmlDecode(htmlEncodedValue) == "é>"). Problem is, I can't access the htmlEncodedValue before I search on it. I ended up finding exactly how the String was encoded on the other side. I wrote a dirty string replace function that changes &#233; to &eacute; for the characters I need (around 15 chars so really not all that bad). Thanks for your help! –  Hugo Migneron Feb 1 '11 at 15:09

HtmlEncode is following the spec. The ISO standard specifies both a name and a number for every entity, and the name and the number are equivalent. Therefore, a conforming implementation of HtmlEncode is free to encode all points as numbers, or all as names, or some mixture of the two.

I suggest that you approach your problem from the other direction: call HtmlDecode on the target text, then search through the decoded text using the raw string.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggestion. However, I have no control over the target text (for the reason stated in my edit). This would definitely the easiest way to do it otherwise. –  Hugo Migneron Jan 31 '11 at 17:47

ISO-8859-1 is not really relevant to HTML character encoding. From Wikipedia:

Numeric references always refer to Unicode code points, regardless of the page's encoding.

Only for undefined Unicode code points ISO-8859-1 is often used:

Using numeric references that refer to permanently undefined characters and control characters is forbidden, with the exception of the linefeed, tab, and carriage return characters. That is, characters in the hexadecimal ranges 00–08, 0B–0C, 0E–1F, 7F, and 80–9F cannot be used in an HTML document, not even by reference, so "™", for example, is not allowed. However, for backward compatibility with early HTML authors and browsers that ignored this restriction, raw characters and numeric character references in the 80–9F range are interpreted by some browsers as representing the characters mapped to bytes 80–9F in the Windows-1252 encoding.

Now to answer your question: For search to work best, you should really search the unencoded HTML (stripping the HTML tags first) using an unencoded search string. Matching encoded strings will lead to unexpected results, like hits based on HTML tags or comments, and hits missing because of differences in the HTML that are invisible in the text.

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Unfortunately that is not a option. I cannot access the string I am searching beforehand. The only string I can manipulate is the search query. –  Hugo Migneron Jan 31 '11 at 18:55

I made this function, I think it will help

        string BasHtmlEncode(string x)
        {
           StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
           foreach (char c in x.ToCharArray())
               sb.Append(String.Format("&#{0};", Convert.ToInt16(c)));
           return(sb.ToString());
        }
share|improve this answer

I developed following code to keep a-z,A-Z and 0-1 not encoded but rest:

public static string Encode(string source)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(source)) return string.Empty;

    var sb = new StringBuilder(source.Length);
    foreach (char c in source)
    {
        if (c >= 'a' && c <= 'z')
        {
            sb.Append(c);
        }
        else if (c >= 'A' && c <= 'Z')
        {
            sb.Append(c);
        }
        else if (c >= '0' && c <= '9')
        {
            sb.Append(c);
        }
        else
        {
            sb.AppendFormat("&#{0};",Convert.ToInt32(c));
        }
    }

    return sb.ToString();
}
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