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Okay, so I'm trying to grasp polymorphism, and for the most part it seems fairly straight forward. I'm running into issues with being able to call functions/properties that are unique to the child class. I'm wondering if there is a way to do do something similar to the following:

public class Creature
{
   public int HealthPoints {get; set;}
   public string Name {get; set;}
   public int AttackValue {get; set;}

   public Creature();
}

public class Magical : Creature
{
   public int Mana {get; set;}
}

So, in this rudimentary example, I'd have a list of Creatures and would need to be able to call from that the Mana property of any given Magical creature.

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I guess you are talking about casting? ((Magical)myCreature).Mana = 10;. –  Uwe Keim Jan 31 '11 at 18:09
1  
make sure you check if the object is of that type first, then do what Uwe sugests –  Kris Ivanov Jan 31 '11 at 18:11
1  
Casting here is a hack, and a code smell. Casting will work around your problem but it isn't a true fix. You need to refactor your code so you don't need to know which type of Creature an object is. –  Binary Worrier Jan 31 '11 at 18:30

8 Answers 8

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The short answer:

As you have surely seen in other answers, you can access the Mana property of magical creatures as follows:

foreach (Creature creature in creatures)
{
    if (creature is Magical)
    {
        var magical = creature as Magical;
        // ... do something with 'magical.Mana' here...
    }
}

Going a step further:

Since we're talking about polymorphism already, you should know that if (x is SomeType) { .. } can be a code smell. Let's say you indeed have a foreach loop for processing all your creatures. It might then be better to create a virtual method in the base class, and do whatever you're doing inside the foreach loop in that virtual method. You would then override the method in your Magical class and thereby get rid of the if statement.

Let's do an example. Let's say, all your creatures get hit and lose some energy. Normal creatures lose health points, while magical creatures lose mana:

public partial class Creature   // rest of your class is omitted in this example
{
    public virtual void TakeHit()
    {
        // whatever you had in your original foreach loop, e.g.:
        HealthPoints--;
    }
}

public partial class Magical : Creature
{
    public override void TakeHit()
    {
        // ... any special processing for Magical creatures goes here, e.g.:
        Mana--;
        // (you could also call 'base.TakeHit()' in this method.)
    }
}

Your original foreach loop now becomes much simpler:

foreach (Creature creature in creatures)
{                        // note: no more if statement -- The virtual method
    creature.TakeHit();  // invocation now takes care of distinguising
}                        // different (sub-)types of Creatures!

I would like to recommend a very nice presentation on this very topic to you: Conditionals and Polymorphism.

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+1: Thank you, I started writing an answer to this effect but got dragged away by the real world. The sooner I win the lottery, the sooner I'll be done with such pesky interuptions :) –  Binary Worrier Jan 31 '11 at 18:27
    
Thank you for the answer, it's very informative. I've started looking over that presentation. I'm curious though - with the in-depth answer by creating a virtual representation for every data member/property/function wouldn't the parent class become bloated with values it doesn't actually use which would clutter child classes with options in the IDE? I suppose you could set each as protected and override it in the child as a public? –  DivinusVox Feb 1 '11 at 1:26
    
@DivinusVox: If you keep adding properties & methods to a class, then it will eventually become bloated. In all likeliness, the problem will be that you're trying to do too many different things in one place, and thus your class would violate the Single Responsiblity Principle. I can't go into details here, but there are ways to correct this. Splitting up your class into several classes, each with a dedicated purpose, is one. -- And no, in C#, once a method has been declared protected, it cannot be redeclared public. –  stakx Feb 1 '11 at 8:45

So, in this rudimentary example, I'd have a list of Creatures and would need to be able to call from that the Mana property of any given Magical creature.

Yes, this is possible. Use Enumerable.OfType<T>:

IEnumerable<Creature> creatures = new List<Creature>();
// populate creatures
var magicalCreatures = creatures.OfType<Magical>();
foreach(var magicalCreature in magicalCreatures) {
    Console.WriteLine(magicalCreature.Mana);
}
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So I'm trying some of these methods to get a handle on it. I'm having trouble actually populating the list creatures. The add function that's normally used to pop a variable on doesn't seem to exist. How might I do that? –  DivinusVox Feb 1 '11 at 1:08
    
Also, I'm trying to figure out why IEnumerable would be preferable over a standard List I was able to implement it in the same way. Thanks again! –  DivinusVox Feb 1 '11 at 1:41

You need to do a conversion to "Magical" at that point. For example:

Creature aCreature = GetMyCreature();
Magical asMagical = aCreature as Magical; // Using "as" operator..
if (asMagical != null)
    Console.WriteLine(asMagical.Mana);
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if (myCreature is Magical)
{
     var myMagicalCreature = (Magical)myCreature;
     //....access mana, etc.
}
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this should do the job:

foreach (var item in collection)
{
    Magical magical = item as Magical;
    if (magical != null)
        magical.Mana = 10;
}       
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In this specific example you would just need to cast the Creature as Magical, and then call your function. You would then do something like:

((Magical)myCreature).Mana = 0;
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If a property is unique to the child class then you will have to cast it to be the child class to access the property, e.g.

foreach(Creature creature in creatures)
{
    Magical magical = creature as Magical;
    if (magical != null)
    {
        // Do something with magical.Mana.
    }
}

Or alternatively with LINQ:

foreach(Magical magical in creatures.OfType<Magical>())
{
    // Do something with magical.Mana.
}

It doesn't make sense to do something like:

foreach(Creature creature in creatures)
{
    // Do something with creature.Mana.
}

Because your creature might not be a Magical and therefore wouldn't have Mana.

Polymorphism comes in where you have two different things with the same properties.

foreach(Creature creature in creatures)
{
    // Do something with creature.AttackValue.
}

AttackValue is common to both Creature and Magical so you can happily use it without caring whether it is a Creature or a Magical. And the two could have completely different implementations of AttackValue - you don't care because you are treating them polymorphically.

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Inheritance only works one way; all child classes are their parents, but no parent is their child.

To get what you want, you must know the class that you are treating as a Creature is in fact a Magical. You can test this using:

//Uses reflection to examine the type; useful in generic-typed situations
bool isMagical = typeof(T).IsAssignableFrom(Magical); //generic to T where T:Creature

//A keyword-based statement that basically does the same thing given an instance
bool isMagical = creatureInstance is Magical;

If it is feasible, you could provide a non-reflective way to discover this, by declaring something in Creature that must be specified in Magical:

public Class Creature
{
   public int HealthPoints {get; set;}
   public string Name {get; set;}
   public int AttackValue {get; set;}
   public abstract CreatureType Type {get;}

   public Creature();
}

public Class Magical : Creature
{
   public override CreatureType Type {get{return CreatureType.Magical;}}
   public int Mana {get; set;}
}

...

if(creatureInstance.Type == CreatureType.Magical) {...}

Once you know the Creature is a Magical, you can treat the instance as its subclass by casting:

//Direct cast; throws an InvalidCastException if creatureInstance isn't Magical
var mana = ((Magical)creatureInstance).Mana;

//Safe cast - returns null if creatureInstance isn't Magical,
//which in this usage will throw a NullReferenceException anyway
var mana = (creatureInstance as Magical).Mana;
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