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For tile checking in scrabble, you make four 5x5 grids of letters totalling 100 tiles. I would like to make one where all 40 horizontal and vertical words are valid. The set of available tiles contains:

  • 12 x E
  • 9 x A, I
  • 8 x O
  • 6 x N, R, T
  • 4 x D, L, S, U
  • 3 x G
  • 2 x B, C, F, H, M, P, V, W, Y, blank tile (wildcard)
  • 1 x K, J, Q, X, Z

The dictionary of valid words is available here (700KB). There are about 12,000 valid 5 letter words.

Here's an example where all 20 horizontal words are valid:

Z O W I E|P I N O T
Y O G I N|O C t A D   <= blank being used as 't'
X E B E C|N A L E D
W A I T E|M E R L E
V I N E R|L U T E A
---------+---------
U S N E A|K N O S P
T A V E R|J O L E D
S O F T A|I A M B I
R I D G Y|H A I T h   <= blank being used as 'h'
Q U R S H|G R O U F

I'd like to create one where all the vertical ones are also valid. Can you help me solve this? It is not homework. It is a question a friend asked me for help with.

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2  
My first inclination is that you can score potential horizontal moves based on how many valid words have the prefixes made vertically. –  Null Set Jan 31 '11 at 18:24
    
What Null Set said, and also you can eliminate entire subsets of searches if you can demonstrate that there's no possible words that can fit in the vertical slots for a particular set of horizontal words at the top. –  John Jan 31 '11 at 18:29
    
You might also want to work in extra value for finding valid places to put the hard to use letters. –  Null Set Jan 31 '11 at 18:33
1  
Took me a few tries to parse your first sentence. Do you mean "to check that you have a complete set of Scrabble tiles"? I'm pretty sure but not sure enough to edit for clarity. –  Ben Jackson Feb 2 '11 at 0:08
2  
If anyone was curious, I eventually counted there to be 2,693,056,976 valid 5x5 blocks. Either that or 6,988,024,272 as it may have overflowed, but I think that unlikely. –  Null Set Feb 5 '11 at 18:21
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5 Answers 5

up vote 33 down vote accepted
+250

Final Edit: Solved! Here is a solution.

GNAWN|jOULE
RACHE|EUROS
IDIOT|STEAN
PINOT|TRAvE
TRIPY|SOLES
-----+-----
HOWFF|ZEBRA
AGILE|EQUID
CIVIL|BUXOM
EVENT|RIOJA
KEDGY|ADMAN

Here's a photo of it constructed with my scrabble set. http://twitpic.com/3wn7iu

This one was easy to find once I had the right approach, so I bet you could find many more this way. See below for methodology.


Construct a prefix tree from the dictionary of 5 letter words for each row and column. Recursively, a given tile placement is valid if it forms valid prefixes for its column and row, and if the tile is available, and if the next tile placement is valid. The base case is that it is valid if there is no tile left to place.

It probably makes sense to just find all valid 5x5 boards, like Glenn said, and see if any four of them can be combined. Recursing to a depth of 100 doesn't sound like fun.

Edit: Here is version 2 of my code for this.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

typedef union node node;
union node {
    node* child[26];
    char string[6];
};

typedef struct snap snap;
struct snap {
    node* rows[5];
    node* cols[5];
    char tiles[27];
    snap* next;
};

node* root;
node* vtrie[5];
node* htrie[5];
snap* head;

char bag[27] = {9,2,2,4,12,2,3,2,9,1,1,4,2,6,8,2,1,6,4,6,4,2,2,1,2,1,2};
const char full_bag[27] = {9,2,2,4,12,2,3,2,9,1,1,4,2,6,8,2,1,6,4,6,4,2,2,1,2,1,2};
const char order[26] = {16,23,9,25,21,22,5,10,1,6,7,12,15,2,24,3,20,13,19,11,8,17,14,0,18,4};

void insert(char* string){
    node* place = root;
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<5;i++){
        if(place->child[string[i] - 'A'] == NULL){
            int j;
            place->child[string[i] - 'A'] = malloc(sizeof(node));
            for(j=0;j<26;j++){
                place->child[string[i] - 'A']->child[j] = NULL;
            }
        }
        place = place->child[string[i] - 'A'];
    }
    memcpy(place->string, string, 6);
}

void check_four(){
    snap *a, *b, *c, *d;
    char two_total[27];
    char three_total[27];
    int i;
    bool match;
    a = head;
    for(b = a->next; b != NULL; b = b->next){
        for(i=0;i<27; i++)
            two_total[i] = a->tiles[i] + b->tiles[i];
        for(c = b->next; c != NULL; c = c->next){
            for(i=0;i<27; i++)
                three_total[i] = two_total[i] + c->tiles[i];
            for(d = c->next; d != NULL; d = d->next){
                match = true;
                for(i=0; i<27; i++){
                    if(three_total[i] + d->tiles[i] != full_bag[i]){
                        match = false;
                        break;
                    }
                }
                if(match){
                    printf("\nBoard Found!\n\n");
                    for(i=0;i<5;i++){
                        printf("%s\n", a->rows[i]->string);
                    }
                    printf("\n");
                    for(i=0;i<5;i++){
                        printf("%s\n", b->rows[i]->string);
                    }
                    printf("\n");
                    for(i=0;i<5;i++){
                        printf("%s\n", c->rows[i]->string);
                    }
                    printf("\n");
                    for(i=0;i<5;i++){
                        printf("%s\n", d->rows[i]->string);
                    }
                    exit(0);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

void snapshot(){
    snap* shot = malloc(sizeof(snap));
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<5;i++){
        printf("%s\n", htrie[i]->string);
        shot->rows[i] = htrie[i];
        shot->cols[i] = vtrie[i];
    }
    printf("\n");
    for(i=0;i<27;i++){
        shot->tiles[i] = full_bag[i] - bag[i];
    }
    bool transpose = false;
    snap* place = head;
    while(place != NULL && !transpose){
        transpose = true;
        for(i=0;i<5;i++){
            if(shot->rows[i] != place->cols[i]){
                transpose = false;
                break;
            }
        }
        place = place->next;
    }
    if(transpose){
        free(shot);
    }
    else {
        shot->next = head;
        head = shot;
        check_four();

    }
}

void pick(x, y){
    if(y==5){
        snapshot();
        return;
    }
    int i, tile,nextx, nexty, nextz;
    node* oldv = vtrie[x];
    node* oldh = htrie[y];
    if(x+1==5){
        nexty = y+1;
        nextx = 0;
    } else {
        nextx = x+1;
        nexty = y;
    }
    for(i=0;i<26;i++){
        if(vtrie[x]->child[order[i]]!=NULL &&
           htrie[y]->child[order[i]]!=NULL &&
           (tile = bag[i] ? i : bag[26] ? 26 : -1) + 1) {
                vtrie[x] = vtrie[x]->child[order[i]];
                htrie[y] = htrie[y]->child[order[i]];
                bag[tile]--;

                pick(nextx, nexty);

                vtrie[x] = oldv;
                htrie[y] = oldh;
                bag[tile]++;
           }
    }
}

int main(int argc, char** argv){
    root = malloc(sizeof(node));
    FILE* wordlist = fopen("sowpods5letters.txt", "r");
    head = NULL;
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<26;i++){
        root->child[i] = NULL;
    }
    for(i=0;i<5;i++){
        vtrie[i] = root;
        htrie[i] = root;
    }

    char* string = malloc(sizeof(char)*6);
    while(fscanf(wordlist, "%s", string) != EOF){
        insert(string);
    }
    free(string);
    fclose(wordlist);
    pick(0,0);

    return 0;
}

This tries the infrequent letters first, which I'm no longer sure is a good idea. It starts to get bogged down before it makes it out of the boards starting with x. After seeing how many 5x5 blocks there were I altered the code to just list out all the valid 5x5 blocks. I now have a 150 MB text file with all 4,430,974 5x5 solutions.

I also tried it with just recursing through the full 100 tiles, and that is still running.

Edit 2: Here is the list of all the valid 5x5 blocks I generated. http://web.cs.sunyit.edu/~levyt/solutions.rar

Edit 3: Hmm, seems there was a bug in my tile usage tracking, because I just found a block in my output file that uses 5 Zs.

COSTE
ORCIN
SCUZZ
TIZZY
ENZYM

Edit 4: Here is the final product.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

typedef union node node;
union node {
    node* child[26];
    char string[6];
};

node* root;
node* vtrie[5];
node* htrie[5];
int score;
int max_score;

char block_1[27] = {4,2,0,2, 2,0,0,0,2,1,0,0,2,1,2,0,1,2,0,0,2,0,0,1,0,1,0};//ZEBRA EQUID BUXOM RIOJA ADMAN
char block_2[27] = {1,0,1,1, 4,2,2,1,3,0,1,2,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,2,1,0,1,0,0};//HOWFF AGILE CIVIL EVENT KEDGY
char block_3[27] = {2,0,1,1, 1,0,1,1,4,0,0,0,0,3,2,2,0,2,0,3,0,0,1,0,1,0,0};//GNAWN RACHE IDIOT PINOT TRIPY
                                                                            //JOULE EUROS STEAN TRAVE SOLES
char bag[27] =     {9,2,2,4,12,2,3,2,9,1,1,4,2,6,8,2,1,6,4,6,4,2,2,1,2,1,2};
const char full_bag[27] = {9,2,2,4,12,2,3,2,9,1,1,4,2,6,8,2,1,6,4,6,4,2,2,1,2,1,2};
const char order[26] = {16,23,9,25,21,22,5,10,1,6,7,12,15,2,24,3,20,13,19,11,8,17,14,0,18,4};
const int value[27] = {244,862,678,564,226,1309,844,765,363,4656,909,414,691,463,333,687,11998,329,218,423,536,1944,1244,4673,639,3363,0};

void insert(char* string){
    node* place = root;
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<5;i++){
        if(place->child[string[i] - 'A'] == NULL){
            int j;
            place->child[string[i] - 'A'] = malloc(sizeof(node));
            for(j=0;j<26;j++){
                place->child[string[i] - 'A']->child[j] = NULL;
            }
        }
        place = place->child[string[i] - 'A'];
    }
    memcpy(place->string, string, 6);
}

void snapshot(){
    static int count = 0;
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<5;i++){
        printf("%s\n", htrie[i]->string);
    }
    for(i=0;i<27;i++){
            printf("%c%d ", 'A'+i, bag[i]);
    }
    printf("\n");
    if(++count>=1000){
        exit(0);
    }
}


void pick(x, y){
    if(y==5){
        if(score>max_score){
            snapshot();
            max_score = score;
        }
        return;
    }
    int i, tile,nextx, nexty;
    node* oldv = vtrie[x];
    node* oldh = htrie[y];
    if(x+1==5){
        nextx = 0;
        nexty = y+1;
    } else {
        nextx = x+1;
        nexty = y;
    }
    for(i=0;i<26;i++){
        if(vtrie[x]->child[order[i]]!=NULL &&
           htrie[y]->child[order[i]]!=NULL &&
           (tile = bag[order[i]] ? order[i] : bag[26] ? 26 : -1) + 1) {
                vtrie[x] = vtrie[x]->child[order[i]];
                htrie[y] = htrie[y]->child[order[i]];
                bag[tile]--;
                score+=value[tile];

                pick(nextx, nexty);

                vtrie[x] = oldv;
                htrie[y] = oldh;
                bag[tile]++;
                score-=value[tile];
           }
    }
}

int main(int argc, char** argv){
    root = malloc(sizeof(node));
    FILE* wordlist = fopen("sowpods5letters.txt", "r");
    score = 0;
    max_score = 0;
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<26;i++){
        root->child[i] = NULL;
    }
    for(i=0;i<5;i++){
        vtrie[i] = root;
        htrie[i] = root;
    }
    for(i=0;i<27;i++){
        bag[i] = bag[i] - block_1[i];
        bag[i] = bag[i] - block_2[i];
        bag[i] = bag[i] - block_3[i];

        printf("%c%d ", 'A'+i, bag[i]);
    }

    char* string = malloc(sizeof(char)*6);
    while(fscanf(wordlist, "%s", string) != EOF){
        insert(string);
    }
    free(string);
    fclose(wordlist);
    pick(0,0);

    return 0;
}

After finding out how many blocks there were (nearly 2 billion and still counting), I switched to trying to find certain types of blocks, in particular the difficult to construct ones using uncommon letters. My hope was that if I ended up with a benign enough set of letters going in to the last block, the vast space of valid blocks would probably have one for that set of letters.

I assigned each tile a value inversely proportional to the number of 5 letter words it appears in. Then, when I found a valid block I would sum up the tile values, and if the score was the best I had yet seen, I would print out the block.

For the first block I removed the blank tiles, figuring that the last block would need that flexibility the most. After letting it run until I had not seen a better block appear for some time, I selected the best block, and removed the tiles in it from the bag, and ran the program again, getting the second block. I repeated this for the 3rd block. Then for the last block I added the blanks back in and used the first valid block it found.

share|improve this answer
    
I modified this algorithm to prefer tiles which are the prefixes of many words, and I got a magic square. :) –  biziclop Feb 2 '11 at 22:28
    
Because the arrangement of the 4 5x5 blocks doesn't affect correctness, recursing "the full 100 times" will actually do 4*3*2*1=12 times too much work trying all arrangements of a set of 4 blocks. You could remedy this by enforcing an order on the 4 blocks within each solution you try, e.g. that the top-left block, treated as a 25-character string, must be lexicographically less than the top-right, which must be lex.ly less than the bottom left etc. –  j_random_hacker Feb 3 '11 at 16:16
    
Another idea that could help is to keep just 1 representative 5x5 block for each distinct vector of used letters. E.g. if 3 different 5x5 blocks all use the same number of each letter, you only need to keep 1 of those blocks -- it doesn't matter which one -- as all 3 are equivalent in terms of fitting 4 blocks into a complete 10x10 square. (Later if you want to enumerate all possible solutions, you can still go back through your list of all 4,430,974 blocks to find them all.) –  j_random_hacker Feb 3 '11 at 16:39
    
My code is resulting in much more than 4 million valid 5x5 blocks. So far I'm at 23 million and that's only blocks starting with an A. Of course, I probably have a bug. –  Fantius Feb 4 '11 at 21:17
    
See my answer where I'm starting simpler -- 2x2 instead of 5x5. –  Fantius Feb 4 '11 at 21:31
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Here's how I would try this. First construct a prefix tree.

Pick a word and place it horizontally on top. Pick a word and place it vertically. Alternate them until exhausted options. By alternating you start to fix the first letters and eliminating lots of mismatching words. If you really do find such square, then do a check whether they can be made with those pieces.

For 5x5 squares: after doing some thinking it can't be worse than O(12000!/11990!) for random text words. But thinking about it a little bit more. Every time you fix a letter (in normal text) you eliminate about 90% (an optimistic guess) of your words. This means after three iterations you've got 12 words. So the actual speed would be

O(n * n/10 * n/10 * n/100 * n/100 * n/1000 * n/1000 ...
which for 12000 elements acts something like n^4 algorithm

which isn't that bad.

Probably someone can do a better analysis of the problem. But the search for words should still converge quite quickly.

There can be more eliminating done by abusing the infrequent letters. Essentially find all words that have infrequent letters. Try to make a matching positions for each letters. Construct a set of valid letters for each position.

For example, let's say we have four words with letter Q in it.

 AQFED, ZQABE, EDQDE, ELQUO

 this means there are two valid positionings of those:

 xZxxx
 AQFED
 xAxxx   ---> this limits our search for words that contain [ABDEFZ] as the second letter
 xBxxx
 xExxx

 same for the other

 EDQDE   ---> this limits our search for words that contain [EDLU] as the third letter
 ELQUO

 all appropriate words are in union of those two conditions

So basically, if we have multiple words that contain infrequent letter X in word S at position N, means that other words that are in that matrix must have letter that is also in S in position n.

Formula:

  • Find all words that contain infrequent letter X at position 1 (next iteration 2, 3... )
  • Make a set A out of the letters in those words
  • Keep only those words from the dictionary that have letter from set A in position 1
  • Try to fit those into the matrix (with the first method)
  • Repeat with position 2
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I would approach the problem (naively, to be sure) by taking a pessimistic view. I'd try to prove there was no 5x5 solution, and therefore certainly not four 5x5 solutions. To prove there was no 5x5 solution I'd try to construct one from all possibilities. If my conjecture failed and I was able to construct a 5x5 solution, well, then, I'd have a way to construct 5x5 solutions and I would try to construct all of the (independent) 5x5 solutions. If there were at least 4, then I would determine if some combination satisfied the letter count restrictions.

[Edit] Null Set has determined that there are "4,430,974 5x5 solutions". Are these valid? I mean that we have a limitation on the number of letters we can use. This limitation can be expressed as a boundary vector BV = [9, 2, 2, 4, ...] corresponding to the limits on A, B, C, etc. (You see this vector in Null Set's code). A 5x5 solution is valid if each term of its letter count vector is less than the corresponding term in BV. It would be easy to check if a 5x5 solution is valid as it was created. Perhaps the 4,430,974 number can be reduced, say to N.

Regardless, we can state the problem as: find four letter count vectors among the N whose sum is equal to BV. There are (N, 4) possible sums ("N choose 4"). With N equal to 4 million this is still on the order of 10^25---not an encouraging number. Perhaps you could search for four whose first terms sum to 9, and if so checking that their second terms sum to 2, etc.

I'd remark that after choosing 4 from N the computations are independent, so if you have a multi-core machine you can make this go faster with a parallel solution.

[Edit2] Parallelizing probably wouldn't make much difference, though. At this point I might take an optimistic view: there are certainly more 5x5 solutions than I expected, so there may be more final solutions than expected, too. Perhaps you might not have to get far into the 10^25 to hit one.

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Constructing them naively is going to take O(26^25) operations. That's a massive number and far far too slow. –  marcog Jan 31 '11 at 18:44
    
There certainly is a 5x5 solution printed in Knuth volume 4A -- more than one. He uses a different, smaller dictionary and doesn't limit the tiles available -- so if there's no solution, it's probably because of the tile set rather than the dictionary. I'd expect there to still be solutions, though. –  Darius Bacon Jan 31 '11 at 20:07
    
@Darius I just implemented my solution and holy crap there are a TON of 5x5 word blocks. I stopped printing them when my output file was twice the size of the whole SOWPODS file. –  Null Set Feb 1 '11 at 9:03
    
@NullSet Can you share the code you have so far? –  marcog Feb 1 '11 at 12:25
    
@marcog Edited it into my answer. –  Null Set Feb 1 '11 at 19:19
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I'm starting with something simpler.

Here are some results so far:

   3736 2x2 solutions
8812672 3x3 solutions

The 1000th 4x4 solution is
   A A H S
   A C A I
   L A I R
   S I R E

The 1000th 5x5 solution is
   A A H E D
   A B U N A
   H U R S T
   E N S U E
   D A T E D

The 1000th 2x4x4 solution is
   A A H S | A A H S
   A B A C | A B A C
   H A I R | L E K U
   S C R Y | S T E D
   --------+--------
   D E E D | D E E M
   E I N E | I N T I
   E N O L | O V E R
   T E L T | L Y N E

Note that transposing an 'A' and a blank that is being used as an 'A' should be considered the same solution. But transposing the rows with the columns should be considered a different solution. I hope that makes sense.

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Here are a lot of precomputed 5x5's. Left as an exercise to the reader to find 4 compatible ones :-)

http://www.gtoal.com/wordgames/wordsquare/all5

share|improve this answer
    
Does that use the required dictionary? –  marcog Feb 1 '11 at 9:45
    
It does not. For example "AARON" is not in sowpods.txt. –  Glenn Feb 2 '11 at 20:18
    
True, but I think it was a superset of SOWPODS so you should be able to eliminate any squares containing words you don't want... –  Graham Toal Jan 18 '12 at 16:48
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