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So, i've got an array like this:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [name] => Something
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [name] => Something else
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [name] => Something else....
        )
)

Is there a simple way of imploding the values into a string, like this:

echo implode(', ', $array[index]['name']) // result: Something, Something else, Something else...

without using a loop to concate the values, like this:

foreach ($array as  $key => $val) {
    $string .= ', ' . $val;
}
$string = substr($string, 0, -2); // Needed to cut of the last ', '
share|improve this question
    
I dunno, implode()? –  Rafe Kettler Jan 31 '11 at 18:24
2  
@Rafe Kettler: Yeah but it only works on single-dimensional arrays. –  BoltClock Jan 31 '11 at 18:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Simplest way, when you have only one item in inner arrays:

$values = array_map('array_pop', $array);
$imploded = implode(',', $values);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a bunch, i'll give it a shot! –  qwerty Jan 31 '11 at 18:27
    
For some reason stackoverflow is being a b*tch, and wont let me accept your answer. But thank you, this is what i was looking for. The first line of the code is pretty neat, i'll keep that in mind for future needs. –  qwerty Jan 31 '11 at 18:30
    
@qwerty: Wait a couple minutes more. –  BoltClock Jan 31 '11 at 18:35

You can use a common array_map() trick to "flatten" the multidimensional array then implode() the "flattened" result, but internally PHP still loops through your array when you call array_map().

function get_name($i) {
    return $i['name'];
}

echo implode(', ', array_map('get_name', $array));
share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah, but PHP does it much faster. Thanks. –  qwerty Jan 31 '11 at 18:26
2  
This would be preferably to using array_pop(). If your 2nd tier array is given additional keys, it is not guaranteed the "name" key will be the first in the stack. Defensive programming FTW. –  John Cartwright Jan 31 '11 at 18:49
2  
On another note, if you are skeptical about creating a new function in the namespace, then either use closures or create_function. echo implode(', ', array_map(create_function('$a', 'return $a["name"];'), $array)); –  John Cartwright Jan 31 '11 at 18:53
    
You've got a very good point regarding your second comment, but in this case singles solution will do just fine. And yes, i am a bit skeptical about creating functions for this kind of usage. You see, i'm in the middle of learning OOP, so i'm kind of confused about when and where to use "normal" functions. Your last comment solved that though. I wish i could accept two posts. –  qwerty Jan 31 '11 at 19:51

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