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I am a new user of mySQL database. I am trying to load a database using a .sql dump file. The .sql file is of size 1GB and the loading process has been running for two days, and hasn't completed yet. I am running SQL on a virtual Linux machine on a MacOS host.

I am hoping somebody would have already tried this out, So I would like to know if I am doing the right thing? Is this expected to be slow? How much more time could it take?

Btw, the command I used was

mysql -u root -p dblinux < dblinux.sql

Thanks orasp


my.cnf file

[mysqld] 

datadir=/var/lib/mysql 
socket=/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock 
user=mysql 

# Default to using old password format for compatibility with mysql 3.x 
# clients (those using the mysqlclient10 compatibility package).
old_passwords=1 
# Disabling symbolic-links is recommended to prevent assorted security risks; 
# to do so, uncomment this line: 
# symbolic-links=0 

[mysqld_safe] 

log-error=/var/log/mysqld.log 
pid-file=/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid

top output

PID USER PR NI VIRT RES SHR S %CPU %MEM TIME+ COMMAND 
24273 mysql 18 0 128m 29m 6084 S 0.0 2.9 0:46.88 mysqld 
26157 bioinf 0 -20 11528 4960 1380 S 0.0 0.5 0:06.68 mysql
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Two days for 1GB is far too long. It should take no more than an hour on any decent hardware. You should probably tell us what storage engine you're using for your tables (MyISAM vs InnoDB) as well as show us your server settings (to be found in my.cnf file). A bit about your VM settings (how much RAM it's got, how many CPU power it gets) will be helpful too. –  Mchl Jan 31 '11 at 18:51
    
Hi Mchl, My my.cnf file contains [mysqld] datadir=/var/lib/mysql socket=/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock user=mysql # Default to using old password format for compatibility with mysql 3.x # clients (those using the mysqlclient10 compatibility package). old_passwords=1 # Disabling symbolic-links is recommended to prevent assorted security risks; # to do so, uncomment this line: # symbolic-links=0 [mysqld_safe] log-error=/var/log/mysqld.log pid-file=/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid Could you please tell me how to check the databse type. and the VM settings? Thanks –  orasp Jan 31 '11 at 19:28
    
Hi.. i checked that my virtual machine has 1 GB of RAM. Do I need to increase it?Thanks –  orasp Jan 31 '11 at 19:41
    
I think you should start with increasing amount of memory your MySQL is allowed to use. See some hints here: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/server-parameters.html (at the bottom of the page) –  Mchl Jan 31 '11 at 19:48

1 Answer 1

My suspicion is that your Linux VM may be thrashing to swap space.

Virtual machines are often limited in their allotted RAM. Have you checked whether it's run out? The 'top' command is useful for this.

If you're not familiar with 'top', the upper part of its screen shows general memory and CPU use statistics, which may immediately answer your problem. The worst CPU hogs will be at the head of the processes list that takes up the rest of the screen.

If you hit '?' whilst it's running, it'll show you the options to sort the process list: you may want to sort it by memory use (either virtual or hard).

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Hi Jon, This is what I see with the top output PID USER PR NI VIRT RES SHR S %CPU %MEM TIME+ COMMAND 24273 mysql 18 0 128m 29m 6084 S 0.0 2.9 0:46.88 mysqld 26157 bioinf 0 -20 11528 4960 1380 S 0.0 0.5 0:06.68 mysql Does this look okay? Thanks –  orasp Jan 31 '11 at 19:15
    
Hi - that suggests to me that mysqld has frozen. It's only claimed 128MB of virtual memory (29MB of chip memory), out of the 1GB RAM you've assigned to your virtual machine, which is not the pattern of a swap thrash - and yet it's not using any CPU, so you're looking at a locked up process. Mchl's suggestion (above) is absolutely spot-on. It looks as if mysqld has actually got into an internal "deadly embrace", having hit its self-configured memory limits: it's waiting (forever) for some memory to free up. [cont'd] –  Jon Green Feb 2 '11 at 10:07
    
The first order of business is to kill mysqld, change its limits to something useful (as Mchl describes), restart it, and start over. If it's possible to segment your 1GB SQL file into smaller chunks sensibly, I'd suggest you do that too, and feed them in one at a time. It probably won't make a difference to the memory mysqld uses, but it will give you visibility of how far into the database load you're getting before things lock up, which in turn you can use to estimate the final amount of memory you're going to need. That may be more than you Mac can spare, though. [cont'd] –  Jon Green Feb 2 '11 at 10:08
    
You might want to consider investigating Amazon EC2 instead. A Large Instance (7.5GB memory; US$0.34/hr when in use) sounds like what you need. When you're not using your EC2 instance, you can suspend it, so it's not costing you money until you need it. Just make sure you suspend it rather than terminating it! Amazon Web Services take a bit of learning, and a bit of experimenting, to get used to, but they're incredibly useful. The knowledge will probably serve you well professionally too, as on-demand computing and storage have applications in almost every business. –  Jon Green Feb 2 '11 at 10:09

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