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I'm writing a small webapp in Grails and I have the following question regarding best practices for controller design and using GORM:

I'm storing the user object in session.user. Currently all my action methods start with the following code to make sure a valid user is logged in and that the user object is fresh:

class FooController {
  def actionMethodThatRequiresAValidUser = {
    if (!session?.user) {
      redirect(controller: "authentication", action: "login")
    }
    session.user.refresh()
    ...
    /* do stuff */
    ...
  }
}

Is that best practice? Can it be done in a better and/or more concise way?

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12 Answers 12

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Use a filter, that way you can put that same repeated code in the filter and keep your controllers focussed on the real action.

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Doesn't filter introduce "hidden" code that is not immediately apparent to a developer that later reads the code? –  Alexander Suraphel Mar 23 at 9:39

I think using beforeInterceptor is appropriate.And give some look at this JSecurity plugin.For user authentication jsecurity plugin is very useful.

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You might try defining this as a filter rather than duplicating code.

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I agree with the filter suggestions others have made. If that doesn't work for you, you could define a beforeInterceptor on your controller to minimize some duplication as well.

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There is many ways Better approach is use filter (before) and put if (!session?.user) { redirect(controller: "authentication", action: "login") } this code in filter.

second thing you can use spring security plugin so that you don't have to worry about user session it will automatically control it. see http://blog.springsource.org/2010/08/11/simplified-spring-security-with-grails/ for further information about plugin

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import grails.plugins.springsecurity.Secured

@Secured(['ROLE_ADMIN', 'ROLE_SUB_ADMIN', 'ROLE_USER'])

class DashboardController{

def create() {

    [bankInstance: new Bank(params)]

}

def save() {
    def bankInstance = new Bank(params)
    if (!bankInstance.save(flush: true)) {
        render(view: "create", model: [bankInstance: bankInstance])
        return
    }

    flash.message = message(code: 'default.created.message', args: [message(code: 'bank.label', default: 'Bank'), bankInstance.id])
    redirect(action: "show", id: bankInstance.id)
}
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Have you gone through Spring Security Core.
It's nice framework for security purpose..

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you can also try apache shiro plugin for grails

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While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  010100110110100101101101 Jun 10 '13 at 9:22

Use Spring Security Core.... map Role of usages(User) in the System .. Configure the Same while Installing the Plugin... and dont forget to create an Admin user on bootstrap...

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The question was related to best practises or doing it in a better way. Please elaborate on why it is a best practise/better way because of using Spring Security Core –  kgdesouz Jun 15 '13 at 15:29
    
Here are few advantages that I can think of on top of my mind: 1. Using Spring Security gives us the powerof a well tested code for security management. 2. We get springSecurityService class which has many useful methods including getCurrentUser(). Thus, we do not need to do it ourself. –  Mohd Farid Jun 25 at 18:02

If you aren't looking for a completely secure answer, like Spring Security Core, you can use this code from the grails documentation as a filter:

class SecurityFilters {
   def filters = {
       loginCheck(controller:'*', action:'*') {
           before = {
              if(!session.user && !actionName.equals('login')) {
                  redirect(action:'login')
                  return false
               }
           }
       }
   }
}
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I second spring security. You are trying to reinvent the wheel here. All this has been done for you and more.

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Have a look at the Spring Security Core Plugin which is a rich framework for security purposes. You can use the springSecurityService.isLoggedin() method after injecting the framework, but the framework provides for much finer access and privilege controls that also avoid the need for boilerplate.

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I believe you have a start of a good answer. Please consider developing it by having more supporting commentary and references. –  Dan Andrews Jun 13 at 13:05

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