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I have started the development of a JSF 2 web app using NetBeans 7 (B2) with the default maven-built project structure. I am trying to add more SW engineers to the project, but they want to use Eclipse.

It seems pointless to engage in endless debates about what-is-better-Eclipse-or-Netbeans. I have nothing against Eclipse it is just that I haven't had time to move up the learning curve on it yet. From a management point of view I don't care what tool a SW engineer uses as long as he/she is productive.

What I do need to know if it is reasonable to use the same subversion repository/project from both Eclipse and Netbeans for this type of project. Does anyone know what issues arise from doing this?

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Stick to pure maven pom.xml. Use NetBeans. Do not use Eclipse. You don't have to make your life miserable with Eclipse along with unnecessary plugin settings, ridiculous import|export tasks, and so on. –  Jin Kwon Feb 28 '13 at 15:13
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The M2E project provides nice Eclipse integration for Maven projects - it will create the Eclipse setup from the Maven config. Don't know about NetBeans-specific stuff, but if it uses Maven, that might work. For Subversion integration, Subversive always worked for me. A popular alternative is Subclipse.

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There is a quick way to check if problems are likely. Create a basic web project in NetBeans and a similar one in Eclipse. In separate directories. Now diff their contents. If there aren't any collisions of metadata files, then there shouldn't be any issues with using the same project in both Eclipse and Maven. You just need to make sure to place into SVN project metadata of both tools and then replicate any metadata change in both sets of metadata.

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