Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Below I have a concept of binding class member function to a global function. The main purpose of this is using C++ for C-style callback function implementation. Can this be done in a better way (for example, without final macro or typeof, or using C++0x features)?

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template<typename MF> struct mf_wrapper_helper;

template<typename R, typename T>
struct mf_wrapper_helper<R (T::*)()>
{
    template <R (T::*F)()>
    static R wrapper(T *foo) { return (foo->*F)(); }
};

template<typename R, typename T, typename T1>
struct mf_wrapper_helper<R (T::*)(T1)>
{
    template <R (T::*F)(T1)>
    static R wrapper(T *foo, T1 arg1) { return (foo->*F)(arg1); }
};

#define BIND_MF(mf) \
    mf_wrapper_helper<typeof(mf)>::wrapper<mf>


struct Foo
{
    void x() { cout << "Foo::x()" << endl; }
    void x1(int i) { cout << "Foo::x1(" << i << ")" << endl; }
};

int
main()
{
    typedef void (*f_t)(Foo *);
    typedef void (*f1_t)(Foo *, int i);

    Foo foo;

    f_t f_p = BIND_MF(&Foo::x);
    (*f_p)(&foo);

    f1_t f1_p = BIND_MF(&Foo::x1);
    (*f1_p)(&foo, 314);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
What compiler are you using? If you can use C++0x, just use lambda's that are capture-less, they can be converted to function pointers. Also, why dynamically allocate something in main? –  GManNickG Jan 31 '11 at 19:48
    
Ignore that new - doesn't matter for the question. I use GCC 4.5 and ICC 11.1. Not sure how lambda helps here, since Lambda functions are function objects of an implementation-dependent type. Actually, I don't know C++0x well, code example is appreciated. –  klimkin Jan 31 '11 at 20:26
    
Voted to close because this question would probably be better-suited to codereview.stackexchange.com –  John Dibling Jan 31 '11 at 20:37
    
@klimkin: Like I said, you could make an in-place lambda and it can be converted to a function pointer. We just need to know if C++0x is an option. "Ignore that new - doesn't matter for the question." Exactly, so why is it there? :) @John: I dunno, maybe if it were an official exchange site, but for now it should go here. (Disregarding I think the code-review site is unnecessary.) –  GManNickG Jan 31 '11 at 21:13
1  
One point worth making, though not really an answer: The C++0x keyword decltype is mostly the same thing as the g++ compiler extension typeof. –  aschepler Jan 31 '11 at 22:50
show 3 more comments

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think that the only technique which will work perfectly is to write a C wrapper function for each member function that you wish to invoke within a C callback; i.e.:

extern "C" void Foo_x(Foo *foo)
{
    foo->x();
}

extern "C" void Foo_x1(Foo *foo, int i)
{
    foo->x1(i);
}

You could also use lambda expressions of C++0x, which implicitly convert to a pointer to function having the same parameter and return types as the closure type’s function call operator. But, keep in mind that the language linkage of the function type is "C++", not "C".

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct Foo
{
    void x() { cout << "Foo::x()" << endl; }
    void x1(int i) { cout << "Foo::x1(" << i << ")" << endl; }
};

int main()
{
    typedef void (*f_t)(Foo*); // default ("C++") language linkage
    typedef void (*f1_t)(Foo*, int);

    Foo foo;

    Foo_x(&foo);
    Foo_x1(&foo, -10);

    f_t fn = [] (Foo *foo) {
        foo->x();
    };
    fn(&foo);

    f1_t fn1 = [] (Foo *foo, int i) {
        foo->x1(i);
    };
    fn1(&foo, 314);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Note that Section 5.2.2, Function call, of the C++ Standard states:

Calling a function through an expression whose function type has a language linkage that is different from the language linkage of the function type of the called function’s definition is undefined.

So the following technically invokes undefined behavior:

extern "C" typedef void (*f_t)(Foo*);

int main()
{
    Foo foo;

    f_t fn = [] (Foo *foo) {
        foo->x();
    };
    fn(&foo); // `fn` is a pointer to a function that uses "C++" language linkage,
            // but it is erroneously called through "C" language linkage.

//...

EDIT: After a bit of experimentation, I came up with the following template functions which return lambdas that call the given member function:

template <typename return_t, class base, typename... arg_types>
std::function<return_t (base*, arg_types...)> make_lambda_to_call_member_function(return_t (base::*mem_fn)(arg_types...)) 
{
    return [mem_fn] (base *o, arg_types... args) -> return_t {
        (o->*mem_fn)(args...);
    };
}

template <typename return_t, class base, typename... arg_types>
std::function<return_t (const base*, arg_types...)> make_lambda_to_call_member_function(return_t (base::*cmem_fn)(arg_types...) const) 
{
    return [cmem_fn] (const base *o, arg_types... args) -> return_t {
        (o->*cmem_fn)(args...);
    };
}

If Foo is defined as:

struct Foo
{
    void x() { cout << "Foo::x()" << endl; }
    void x1(int i) { cout << "Foo::x1(" << i << ")" << endl; }
    void cx1(float f) const { cout << "Foo::cx1(" << f << ")" << endl; }
};

Then you use the template make_lambda_to_call_member_function like:

auto fn = make_lambda_to_call_member_function(&Foo::x);
fn(&foo);

auto fn1 = make_lambda_to_call_member_function(&Foo::x1);
fn1(&foo, 314);

auto fn2 = make_lambda_to_call_member_function(&Foo::cx1);
fn2(&foo, 44.832f);

Note, however, that the returned lambda objects will not implicitly convert to a function pointer because the lambda expression uses a lambda-capture.

The latest draft of C++0x, n3225, states:

The closure type for a lambda-expression with no lambda-capture has a public non-virtual non-explicit const conversion function to pointer to function having the same parameter and return types as the closure type's function call operator. The value returned by this conversion function shall be the address of a function that, when invoked, has the same effect as invoking the closure type's function call operator.

The following is illegal:

void (*fn5)(Foo*) = make_lambda_to_call_member_function(&Foo::x);
share|improve this answer
    
It's a good point about linkage type. I see a problem with using lambda - all argument types should be fully listed. With template version all types are calculated with compiler. Is it possible to make a template of lambda function, which will take member function as parameter? –  klimkin Feb 2 '11 at 20:27
    
@klimkin: I updated my answer with a lot more information. To answer your question, yes it's possible to write a template function that returns a lambda object that invokes a given member function, but that lambda object can no longer be converted to a function pointer. –  Daniel Trebbien Feb 2 '11 at 23:47
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.