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I need to filter out records based on some text matching in nvarchar(1000) column. Table has more than 400 thousands records and growing. For now, I am using Like condition:-

SELECT 
    *
FROM
    table_01
WHERE
    Text like '%A1%'
    OR Text like '%B1%'
    OR Text like '%C1%'
    OR Text like '%D1%'

Is there any preferred work around?

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4  
You do know that using such a LIKE '%A1%' operation will definitely disable any index use and thus result in a guaranteed full table scan every time... –  marc_s Jan 31 '11 at 21:30

5 Answers 5

SELECT 
    *
FROM
    table_01
WHERE
    Text like '%[A-Z]1%'

This will check if the texts contains A1, B1, C1, D1, ...

Reference to using the Like Condition in SQL Server

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5  
I have a feeling you've taken the sample code given a bit too literally. –  Joe Stefanelli Jan 31 '11 at 20:49
    
@Joe Stefanelli ... Perhaps I have but all OP mentioned was a "preferred workaround" This is clearly one way. If it was performance then FullText Indicies could be useful. –  John Hartsock Jan 31 '11 at 20:52

Have a look at LIKE on msdn.

You could reduce the number filters by combining more details into a single LIKE clause.

SELECT 
    *
FROM
    table_01
WHERE
    Text like '%[ABCD]1%'
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5  
I have a feeling you've taken the sample code given a bit too literally. –  Joe Stefanelli Jan 31 '11 at 20:48
1  
Not really. The provided query would just do the same thing as the original. The MSDN link explains why. –  msms Jan 31 '11 at 20:50
1  
I could be wrong, but I suspect A1, B1, etc. are just dummy placeholders for the real strings being searched for. –  Joe Stefanelli Jan 31 '11 at 20:53
1  
@Joe: So? If it doesn't make sense to @Jango I would expect a comment from him/her. –  msms Jan 31 '11 at 20:59
1  
better solution sergeb.com/blog/post/Dynamic-multi-value-SQL-LIKE.aspx –  Deepfreezed Jan 25 '12 at 19:38

You can try the following if you know the exact position of your sub string:

SELECT 
    *
FROM
    table_01
WHERE
    SUBSTRING(Text,1,2) in ('B1','C1','D1')
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After some research, LIKE() seems to be better performing than SUBSTRING(). –  mbrownnyc Nov 23 '12 at 18:06

If you can create a FULLTEXT INDEX on that column of your table (that assumes a lot of research on performance and space), then you are probably going to see a big improvement on performance on text matching. You can go to this link to see what FULLTEXT SEARCH is and this link to see how to create a FULLTEXT INDEX.

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Keep in mind that fulltext indexing is word based while LIKE is searching for a character pattern within a string. As a concrete example, a fulltext search for 'work' would not find the word in 'overworked', but a LIKE clause will. –  Joe Stefanelli Jan 31 '11 at 20:45

I needed to do this so that I could allow two different databases in a filter for the DatabaseName column in an SQL Server Profiler Trace Template.

All you can do is fill in the body of a Like clause.

Using the reference in John Hartscock's answer, I found out that the like clause uses a sort of limited regex pattern.

For the OP's scenario, MSMS has the solution.

Assuming I want databases ABCOne, ABCTwo, and ABCThree, I come up with what is essentially independent whitelists for each character:

Like ABC[OTT][NWH][EOR]%

Which is easily extensible to any set of strings. It won't be ironclad, that last pattern would also match ABCOwe, ABCTnr, or ABCOneHippotamus, but if you're filtering a limited set of possible values there's a good chance you can make it work.

You could alternatively use the [^] operator to present a blacklist of unacceptable characters.

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