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We employ Out-of-Process SQL Session State, ASP.NET 3.5 MVC 1.0 and Forms Authentication using IIS 7.

A user's session is correctly set on logon and will time out as expected, redirecting them to a special "Time out" login page. The problem is that some (not all) users log in and are (from what I can tell) immediately unauthenticated and are required to log back in (i.e. redirected to the original "Login" page).

Might anyone have an idea why our users are intermittently being kicked out?

EDIT: I've since added logging on every Application_AuthenticateRequest event, I can tell you that before the user is booted out both the Auth ticket is authenticated, persistent and expires two days later and the request is also authenticated. Upon arriving at the logon page the user is no longer authenticated.

EDIT #2: We've made some progress, it would appear as though users may be unauthenticated because this web app is looking for scripts and other content in the parent app for which users are not authenticated. The original format for inclusion of these scripts is as follows:

<script src="../../Scripts/MicrosoftAjax.js" type="text/javascript"></script>

I have corrected it to:

<script src="<%= Url.Content("~/Scripts/MicrosoftAjax.js") %>" type="text/javascript"></script>

ANSWER The above changes to our script references in our .master pages resolved the issue. It explicitly tells the app to look in the root folder of the current app. Thank you to all who helped. I wish I could have marked more than one as the answer!

Below is our login Action:

    [AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Post)]
    [System.Diagnostics.CodeAnalysis.SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Design", "CA1054:UriParametersShouldNotBeStrings",
        Justification = "Needs to take same parameter type as Controller.Redirect()")]
    public virtual ActionResult LogOn(string userName, string password, string returnUrl)
    {
        if ((HttpContext.Current.User == null) || (!HttpContext.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated))
        {
          if (!ValidateLogOn(userName, password))
          {
              try
              {
                return View();
              }
              catch (Exception ex)
              {
                throw new Exception(string.Format("User validation failed at LogOn: {0}", ex.ToString()));
              }
          }
        }

        bool rememberMe = true;

        FormsAuth.SignIn(userName, rememberMe);

        Session["userName"] = userName;

        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(returnUrl))
        {
            try
            {
                return Redirect(returnUrl);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                throw new Exception(string.Format("User redirect to returnUrl ({0}) failed: {1}", returnUrl, ex.ToString()));
            }
        }
        else
        {
            try
            {
                return RedirectToAction("Index", "RodWebUI");
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                throw new Exception(string.Format("User redirect to action: Index, controller: RodWebUi failed: {0}", ex.ToString()));
            }
        }
    }

Below is our timeoutlogon action:

    public virtual ActionResult TimeOutLogon()
    {
        try
        {
            FormsAuth.SignOut();

            ViewData["TimeoutMsg"] = "Session timed out. Please log back in.";

            return View();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw new Exception(string.Format("Error with redirecting to TimeOutLogon: {0}", ex.ToString()));
        }
    }  

I've since added the following check to our global.asax to log the current status of the request and auth ticket. Everything is authenticated and OK prior to being kicked back to LogOn.

    protected void Application_AuthenticateRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (HttpContext.Current.User != null)
        {
            if (HttpContext.Current.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
            {
                if (HttpContext.Current.User.Identity is FormsIdentity)
                {
                    FormsIdentity identity = (FormsIdentity)HttpContext.Current.User.Identity;

                    FormsAuthenticationTicket ticket = identity.Ticket;

                    LogFunctionCall(HttpContext.Current.User.Identity.Name, "", "User Authentication Check", "", 
                                        string.Format("Auth ticket is expired: {0}, expiration date: {1}, is persistent: {2}, issued: {3}", 
                                        ticket.Expired, ticket.Expiration, ticket.IsPersistent, ticket.IssueDate), "", 0);

                    LogFunctionCall(HttpContext.Current.User.Identity.Name, "", "User Authentication Check Line #2", "", 
                                        string.Format("Raw URL: {0}, Request is authenticated: {1}", HttpContext.Current.Request.RawUrl, HttpContext.Current.Request.IsAuthenticated), "", 0);
                }
            }
        }
    }
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Do you have a load balanced website?

If so, are the machineKeys the same on all nodes? Is the Forms Cookie name the same? If there are discrepancies in those values you can login on one node and seem unauthenticated to the other node.

share|improve this answer
    
This site resides on a single server. –  alan Feb 1 '11 at 15:25
    
Could it be a CSS / Image file that is causing the problem? If you have these in a separate content folder you may need to make them anonymous access.... a request for a resource that a page depends on may be the problem. –  Ciaran Feb 1 '11 at 16:43
    
@Ciaran: I just don't see how this could be the case. This occurs at no specific time and on no specific page. A user could visit their home page, then move to a different page and upon revisting the home page they're kicked to the LogOn page. –  alan Feb 1 '11 at 17:38
    
That's really strange. Could it be a mix of HTTP & HTTPS? –  Ciaran Feb 1 '11 at 20:43
    
Do you use a path in your Cookie settings? If the path's case changes then the cookie won't be found. So, a request for /authorised/ is not the same as /Authorised. –  Ciaran Feb 1 '11 at 20:49
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ASP.Net redirects users to the login page if they are not authenticated OR if they are not authorized to view the resource they are trying to go to.

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All resources on these pages are accessible prior to to the user being required to log back in (i.e. the user should visit a page at one point and seconds later revisit that same page only to be booted out) –  alan Feb 2 '11 at 14:59
    
Do you have a reliable way of recreating this problem? Can you know for sure that when you make a certain request that the issue will show itself? If so, I would set a breakpoint somewhere (BeginRequest in the global.asax would be a good place), and inspect the request, see if the auth cookie is there or not. It's possible that something could be removing the auth cookie (that can be done client side). –  Brian Ball Feb 2 '11 at 15:08
    
Unfortunately we have no reliable way to recreate the problem. This is largely why we're having so much difficulty pinpointing the cause. –  alan Feb 9 '11 at 17:29
    
It would appear as though our child app is looking for its scripts in the parent app directory for which users are not authorized. I've make some changes that are outlined in my edit above, I will update the status when I'm sure content was the cause. –  alan Feb 9 '11 at 17:49
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This might be silly but could the returnUrl be pointing to the login page?

How does the login page behave when the user is already logged in?

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No, the returnUrl is not pointing to the login page. The user logs in and upon navigating to another page on our site they are redirected instead to the Login page with the returnUrl showing the intended URL before being redirected. If the user is already logged in and they were to navigate to the Login page (which they would have to do by typing the url in the address bar) they would be logged out as no password would be supplied. –  alan Jan 31 '11 at 21:33
    
@alan: off-topic: I would not log out users in that case. A simple redirect to "index" would be safer. –  msms Jan 31 '11 at 21:39
    
I noticed that as well, I'll update my logon action code to reflect the new changes. Instead of re-validating the user I will check if the user is authenticated. –  alan Jan 31 '11 at 22:17
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public partial class MasterPage : System.Web.UI.MasterPage
{
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
    }
    protected void signout_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
      Response.Write("<script language=javascript>var wnd=window.open('','newWin','height=1,width=1,left=900,top=700,status=no,toolbar=no,menubar=no,scrollbars=no,maximize=false,resizable=1');</script>");
      Response.Write("<script language=javascript>wnd.close();</script>");
      Response.Write("<script language=javascript>window.open('login.aspx','_parent',replace=true);</script>");
      Session["name"] = null;
    }
}

I'm also adding on all page this code.

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
      Response.Cache.SetCacheability(HttpCacheability.NoCache);
      Response.Cache.SetAllowResponseInBrowserHistory(false);
    }
}
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Thanks for the input but Browser caching was disabled prior to this thread being created. I also achieve this much more efficiently by applying a Controller Filter rather than duplicating the code. –  alan Mar 14 '11 at 13:39
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Spidey sense says that the ASP.NET process or app pool is recycling on you. Could happen for a few reasons. Since sessions are out of process, they won't get eaten by this event.

I'd look at the event logs to see if anything hinkey is going on there.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion but because we've configured sessions to persist via SQL Session State recycles no longer affect our web app sessions. –  alan Feb 1 '11 at 17:36
    
Yes, that is correct. But .NET forms authentication does not use the session at all and it is definitely negatively effected by recycles. –  Wyatt Barnett Feb 1 '11 at 18:26
    
Interesting, then shouldn't a manual recycle cause all logged in users to have to reauthenticate? –  alan Feb 1 '11 at 22:55
    
That would make sense, but I can manually recycle an app pool entirely transparent to all users currently logged in; i.e. they're not required to log back in. (This is part of why this is so perplexing) –  alan Feb 2 '11 at 14:46
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