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I have a Windows service written in C# that spawns several worker threads. Those threads are supposed to loop every X minutes until the service is stopped, which works very well in most cases. But, there is one thread that appears to be stopping for no reason. We already have a try/catch block with logging code around the thread's entire function, but it never logs any exceptions.

In .NET, is there any way to monitor a thread from another process and record when/why/how it stopped?

More details

The code that spawns the thread looks like this:

try
{
    // Create a new thread for processing Incoming Emails
    IncomingEmailThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(ProcessIncomingEmails));
    IncomingEmailThread.Start();

    LogEvent("Service Started", EventLogEntryType.Information);
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    LogEvent(e.Message, EventLogEntryType.Error);
}

And the code inside the thread looks like this:

while (!Closing)
{
    try
    {
        // Wait for 5 minutes before running.
        InterruptableSleep.WaitOne(300000, false);

        // Process the incoming email for all instances
        string[] Instances = Settings.GetAllInstances();
        foreach (string Instance in Instances)
        {
            Logic.IncomingEmail IncomingEmailInstance = new Logic.IncomingEmail(Instance);
            IncomingEmailInstance.CreateRecordsFromIncomingEmail();
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // Log the exception and then eat it so it doesn't stop the thread
        LogEvent(ex.Message + "\r\n" + ex.StackTrace, EventLogEntryType.Error);
    }
}

The problem is not caused by the Closing flag, because this loop usually runs for several days before it stops working. The problem is not an exception inside CreateRecordsFromIncomingEmail(), because the catch block has not logged any exceptions. Our logging code writes directly to the Windows event log, we use it throughout the product, and it is very reliable.

Unfortunately, we can't use a debugger, because we've only seen the problem on one production server. We haven't been able to reproduce it in dev, or on any other servers.

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried attaching to the System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException exception? –  SwDevMan81 Jan 31 '11 at 21:34
    
What version (of V Studio) ? –  Henk Holterman Jan 31 '11 at 21:36
    
I think there are some uncatchable exceptions. In particular out-of-memory and stack-overflow –  CodesInChaos Jan 31 '11 at 21:41
    
@CodeInChaos: wrong! Those exceptions CAN be caught, but WILL propagate (so after catch block the exception is rethrown) –  djechelon Feb 1 '11 at 2:58
    
@dj I thought that's only the case for the ThreadAbortException and not for StackOverflow. –  CodesInChaos Feb 1 '11 at 8:55

7 Answers 7

if you posted some code, including the function that spawns the thread, it would help. Doubt leads to multiple possible explanations

Deadlock

Your thread is not alive anymore because it's stuck in some locks. Double check (if any) all the lock instructions and also pay attention to DB transactions

Running flag set too late

I had a similar problem with a thread never starting at all in Mono, in a scenario similar to yours.

But, if you have code such as this:

{
    Thread t = new Thread(Method);
    t.Start();
    Run = true;
}

void Method()
{
    while(Run)
    { ... }
}

then you may get problems depending in what position you set Run=true. In this case, after Start(), you might think that it will take some time for the thread to reach its control point, but it's actually not true.

Without further information about your code, I might imagine, from your description, that you have a problem like this (ThreadAbortException or ThreadInterruptException can be handled to log but will ultimately propagate, so that's not the case)

Anyway,

You asked how to debug: with Visual Studio you can "connect to process" and attach to your running process, getting the thread list and so on.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm pretty sure it's not a deadlock issue, because we don't have any locking code. I've added the code to my post. The problem is not caused by the Closing flag, because this loop usually runs for several days before it stops working. Unfortunately, we can't use a debugger, because we've only seen the problem on one production server. We haven't been able to reproduce it in dev, or on any other servers. –  Josh Yeager Feb 1 '11 at 3:52
    
@Josh: You could install Windbg on the server and pause the execution live once you enter this condition. –  Adam Robinson Feb 1 '11 at 13:49
    
Also, I'm not familiar with the InterruptableSleep.WaitOne() function. What library is that in? –  Adam Robinson Feb 1 '11 at 13:55
    
The InterruptableSleep object is a System.Threading.AutoResetEvent. I'll have to find out if we can install debug tools on that server. –  Josh Yeager Feb 1 '11 at 14:21

Are you sure it is one of your worker threads that is stopping? (As opposed to a timer thread or something)

share|improve this answer

Attach a debugger and have a look.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, we can't use a debugger, because we've only seen the problem on one production server. We haven't been able to reproduce it in dev, or on any other servers. –  Josh Yeager Feb 1 '11 at 3:54

In Visual Studio 2008 if you pause an app while debugging, then you can select Debug -> Windows -> Threads (or hit Ctrl + Alt + H) to see the threads that are currently executing.

From there you can double-click on a thread to see where it is at the moment. This can possibly indicate if, e.g., your thread is deadlocked on a call to Monitor.Enter or WaitHandle.WaitOne or something like that.

Also, if your thread has really exited, at least you can confirm this by seeing that it is not present in the list.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, we can't use a debugger, because we've only seen the problem on one production server. We haven't been able to reproduce it in dev, or on any other servers. –  Josh Yeager Feb 1 '11 at 3:53

Maybe your logging have exception and you cant log them. Add another logging mechanism. Temporary mail every exception yourself.

If you logging to file system, check your service user's write access to file system.

share|improve this answer
    
Our logging code writes directly to the Windows event log, we use it throughout the product, and it is very reliable. I'm 99% sure that the problem is not in the logging code. –  Josh Yeager Feb 1 '11 at 3:54
    
I think we have to find which part of your code is not working. Basicly create different named files in every thread. And add comments for every step of the code. After all review the files. Maybe you can do this with windows event logs but its might be difficult to review. –  fkucukbaltaci Feb 1 '11 at 8:52

Have you considered registering a handler with the AppDomain.UnhandledException event?

share|improve this answer
    
We do have a logger attached to System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException. It is not recording any errors. –  Josh Yeager Jun 14 '11 at 13:53
up vote 0 down vote accepted

We never did find a solution, but the problem stopped happening. We decided to just add some logging code in case it ever happens again.

share|improve this answer
    
Good news! One more thing you could have tried: Have you looked into DebugDiag? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff420662.aspx You can choose an arbitrary process to set up a monitoring rules and capture data when the condition is raised. –  Matthew Rodatus Jun 14 '11 at 17:25

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