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Is there an easy way in C# to read a properties file that has each property on a separate line followed by an equals sign and the value, such as the following:

ServerName=prod-srv1
Port=8888
CustomProperty=Any value

In Java, the Properties class handles this parsing easily:

Properties myProperties=new Properties();
FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream (new File("CustomProps.properties"));
myProperties.load(fis);
System.out.println(myProperties.getProperty("ServerName"));
System.out.println(myProperties.getProperty("CustomProperty"));

I can easily load the file in C# and parse each line, but is there a built in way to easily get a property without having to parse out the key name and equals sign myself? The C# information I have found seems to always favor XML, but this is an existing file that I don't control and I would prefer to keep it in the existing format as it will require more time to get another team to change it to XML than parsing the existing file.

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Found this blog post codeporting.com/blog/csharp-to-java-conversion/archive/2012/05/… that explains how to convert C# properties to Java. Hope you find it interesting. –  user1345113 May 10 '12 at 2:07
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11 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

No there is no built-in support for this.

You have to make your own "INIFileReader". Maybe something like this?

var data = new Dictionary<string, string>();
foreach (var row in File.ReadAllLines(PATH_TO_FILE))
  data.Add(row.Split('=')[0], string.Join("=",row.Split('=').Skip(1).ToArray()));

Console.WriteLine(data["ServerName"]);

Edit: Updated to reflect Paul's comment.

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1  
is a bad way if the property value contains '=' –  Paul Dinham Sep 11 '11 at 13:00
    
@Paul: I have updated the answer to fix that issue –  Jesper Palm Sep 12 '11 at 18:19
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Most Java ".properties" files can be split by assuming the "=" is the separator - but the format is significantly more complicated than that and allows for embedding spaces, equals, newlines and any Unicode characters in either the property name or value.

I needed to load some Java properties for a C# application so I have implemented JavaProperties.cs to correctly read and write ".properties" formatted files using the same approach as the Java version - you can find it at http://www.kajabity.com/index.php/2009/06/loading-java-properties-files-in-csharp/.

There, you will find a zip file containing the C# source for the class and some sample properties files I tested it with.

Enjoy!

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This link is more up to date kajabity.com/kajabity-tools –  Martin Eden Apr 25 '13 at 11:33
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I've written a method that allows emty lines, outcommenting and quoting within the file.

Examples:

var1="value1"
var2='value2'

'var3=outcommented
;var4=outcommented, too

Here's the method:

public static IDictionary ReadDictionaryFile(string fileName)
{
    Dictionary<string, string> dictionary = new Dictionary<string, string>();
    foreach (string line in File.ReadAllLines(fileName))
    {
        if ((!string.IsNullOrEmpty(line)) &&
            (!line.StartsWith(";")) &&
            (!line.StartsWith("#")) &&
            (!line.StartsWith("'")) &&
            (line.Contains('=')))
        {
            int index = line.IndexOf('=');
            string key = line.Substring(0, index).Trim();
            string value = line.Substring(index + 1).Trim();

            if ((value.StartsWith("\"") && value.EndsWith("\"")) ||
                (value.StartsWith("'") && value.EndsWith("'")))
            {
                value = value.Substring(1, value.Length - 2);
            }
            dictionary.Add(key, value);
        }
    }

    return dictionary;
}
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Final class. Thanks @eXXL.

public class Properties
{
    private Dictionary<String, String> list;
    private String filename;

    public Properties(String file)
    {
        reload(file);
    }

    public String get(String field, String defValue)
    {
        return (get(field) == null) ? (defValue) : (get(field));
    }
    public String get(String field)
    {
        return (list.ContainsKey(field))?(list[field]):(null);
    }

    public void set(String field, Object value)
    {
        if (!list.ContainsKey(field))
            list.Add(field, value.ToString());
        else
            list[field] = value.ToString();
    }

    public void Save()
    {
        Save(this.filename);
    }

    public void Save(String filename)
    {
        this.filename = filename;

        if (!System.IO.File.Exists(filename))
            System.IO.File.Create(filename);

        System.IO.StreamWriter file = new System.IO.StreamWriter(filename);

        foreach(String prop in list.Keys.ToArray())
            if (!String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(list[prop]))
                file.WriteLine(prop + "=" + list[prop]);

        file.Close();
    }

    public void reload()
    {
        reload(this.filename);
    }

    public void reload(String filename)
    {
        this.filename = filename;
        list = new Dictionary<String, String>();

        if (System.IO.File.Exists(filename))
            loadFromFile(filename);
        else
            System.IO.File.Create(filename);
    }

    private void loadFromFile(String file)
    {
        foreach (String line in System.IO.File.ReadAllLines(file))
        {
            if ((!String.IsNullOrEmpty(line)) &&
                (!line.StartsWith(";")) &&
                (!line.StartsWith("#")) &&
                (!line.StartsWith("'")) &&
                (line.Contains('=')))
            {
                int index = line.IndexOf('=');
                String key = line.Substring(0, index).Trim();
                String value = line.Substring(index + 1).Trim();

                if ((value.StartsWith("\"") && value.EndsWith("\"")) ||
                    (value.StartsWith("'") && value.EndsWith("'")))
                {
                    value = value.Substring(1, value.Length - 2);
                }

                try
                {
                    //ignore dublicates
                    list.Add(key, value);
                }
                catch { }
            }
        }
    }


}

Sample use:

//load
Properties config = new Properties(fileConfig);
//get value whith default value
com_port.Text = config.get("com_port", "1");
//set value
config.set("com_port", com_port.Text);
//save
config.Save()
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C# generally uses xml-based config files rather than the *.ini-style file like you said, so there's nothing built-in to handle this. However, google returns a number of promising results.

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I don't know of any built-in way to do this. However, it would seem easy enough to do, since the only delimiters you have to worry about are the newline character and the equals sign.

It would be very easy to write a routine that will return a NameValueCollection, or an IDictionary given the contents of the file.

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There are a few examples of a PropertyBag class on the web which can do this, e.g. this one.

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Yeah there's no built in classes to do this that I'm aware of.

But that shouldn't really be an issue should it? It looks easy enough to parse just by storing the result of Stream.ReadToEnd() in a string, splitting based on new lines and then splitting each record on the = character. What you'd be left with is a bunch of key value pairs which you can easily toss into a dictionary.

Here's an example that might work for you:

public static Dictionary<string, string> GetProperties(string path)
{
    string fileData = "";
    using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(path))
    {
        fileData = sr.ReadToEnd().Replace("\r", "");
    }
    Dictionary<string, string> Properties = new Dictionary<string, string>();
    string[] kvp;
    string[] records = fileData.Split("\n".ToCharArray());
    foreach (string record in records)
    {
        kvp = record.Split("=".ToCharArray());
        Properties.Add(kvp[0], kvp[1]);
    }
    return Properties;
}

Here's an example of how to use it:

Dictionary<string,string> Properties = GetProperties("data.txt");
Console.WriteLine("Hello: " + Properties["Hello"]);
Console.ReadKey();
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2  
if you replace "\n" with '\n' you won't need the .ToCharArray() –  Matthew Whited Jan 31 '10 at 2:23
    
maybe your code is needed to enhance, to handle comment lines that start with #, and also other empty characters, like key = value, the extra spaces should be removed. –  Kelvin Hu Feb 26 '13 at 2:42
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You can also use C# automatic property syntax with default values and a restrictive set. The advantage here is that you can then have any kind of data type in your properties "file" (now actually a class). The other advantage is that you can use C# property syntax to invoke the properties. However, you just need a couple of lines for each property (one in the property declaration and one in the constructor) to make this work.

using System;
namespace ReportTester {
   class TestProperties
   {
        internal String ReportServerUrl { get; private set; }
        internal TestProperties()
        {
            ReportServerUrl = "http://myhost/ReportServer/ReportExecution2005.asmx?wsdl";
        }
   }
}
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The real answer is no (at least not by itself). You can still write your own code to do it.

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I realize that this isn't exactly what you're asking, but just in case:

When you want to load an actual Java properties file, you'll need to accomodate its encoding. The Java docs indicate that the encoding is ISO 8859-1, which contains some escape sequences that you might not correctly interpret. For instance look at this SO answer to see what's necessary to turn UTF-8 into ISO 8859-1 (and vice versa)

When we needed to do this, we found an open-source PropertyFile.cs and made a few changes to support the escape sequences. This class is a good one for read/write scenarios. You'll need the supporting PropertyFileIterator.cs class as well.

Even if you're not loading true Java properties, make sure that your prop file can express all the characters you need to save (UTF-8 at least)

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