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Part of the specification says "Some names are special, e.g. Hughie, Dewey, Louis, and Donald. Other names may be added over the lifetime of the project at arbitrary times. Whenever you input one of those names, play quack.wav."

I could write ...

while (<>) {
    if ($_ =~ /Hughie|Dewey|Louis/) {
        quack() ;
    }
    elsif ($_ =~ /Donald/ {
        quack() ;
        you_re_fired_apprentice() ; # Easter egg don't tell QA
    }
}

... but though untaxing to implement, it looks WTF-y: Where's the binary search? What if there were a sudden stupendous increase in the number of duck names? It would not scale at all!

I could create empty files using those names in a temporary directory, and then use the "file exists" API, but that seems roundabout, and I would have to be sure they were deleted at the end.

Surely there is a better way?

share|improve this question
4  
‘In’? Did you say ‘in’? Whenever you catch yourself using words like in, once, first, unique, union, intersection, set, record, struct, union, or indeed several other unrelated words as well, you should be having an instant, knee-jerk, Pavlovian response of a Eureka lightbulb going off in your head shouting HASH!! I SHOULD BE USING A HASH!! OF COURSE!!! –  tchrist Feb 1 '11 at 4:16
2  
Never trust anybody who writes $_ =~ /whatever/. Ever. –  tchrist Feb 1 '11 at 4:20
    
@tchrist: you've never encountered the always-specify-$_-even-when-its-the-default crowd? how about the my @foo = (); (just in case) crowd? –  ysth Feb 1 '11 at 5:32

6 Answers 6

You could write that, but you should write this:

my %ducks = map {$_ => 1} qw(Hughie Dewey Louis);

while (<>) {
    if ($ducks{$_}) {
        quack() ;
    }
    elsif ($_ eq 'Donald') {
        quack() ;
        you_re_fired_apprentice() ; # Easter egg don't tell QA
    }
}

Creating the hash takes a little bit of time, but not more than O(n). Lookup with a hash is O(1) though, so it is much more efficient than sequential search (via grep or a regex with alternation) assuming you will be checking for more than one or two items.

By the way, the regex that you have will match the words anywhere in the search string. You need to add start and end anchors if you want an exact match.

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I want to match anywhere in the string. It is not obvious that there is a way to do that with a hash. –  Thomas L Holaday Feb 17 '11 at 5:17

Alternatively, you could use smart matching

my @ducks = qw(Hughie Dewey Louis);
my $name = 'Dewey';

say 'smart match' if $name ~~ @ducks;

This is what is used by switch statements, so you could write

given ($name) {
    when (@ducks) {
        quack();
    }
    when ('Donald') {
        quack();
        you_re_fired_apprentice(); # Easter egg don't tell QA
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yay! I was afeared [sic] nobody was going to mention ~~. Still, you’re still back to O(N). BTW, oughtn’t that be you're_fired_apprentice()? ☺ –  tchrist Feb 1 '11 at 4:13
    
Yeah, if nothing else, it seems like the most concise answer. Pavlovian responses aside, 'in' can usually be spelled '~~' too. –  oylenshpeegul Feb 1 '11 at 11:35
    
Search engines are reluctant to report results for the ~~ operator. –  Thomas L Holaday Feb 1 '11 at 13:29
    
+1 for the concise answer. smart matching is now a new tool in my Perl Utility Belt, thanks. –  Day Feb 16 '11 at 19:03

As mentioned, hashes are the way to go for this. This is sort of what OOP looked like before OOP.

use strict;
use warnings;

my %duck_action = (
  Donald => sub {quack(); you_re_fired_apprentice()},
  Hughie => sub {quack()},
  Dewie  => sub {quack()},
  Louis  => sub {quack()},
);

for my $duck (qw( Hughie Dewie Donald Louis Porkie )) {
    print "$duck: ";
    my $action = $duck_action{$duck} || &no_such_duck;
    $action->();
}

sub quack {
    print "Quack!\n";
}

sub you_re_fired_apprentice {
    print "You're fired!\n";
}

sub no_such_duck {
    print "No such duck!\n";
}
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You can use a Perl Hash. See also How can I represent sets in Perl? and Representing Sets in Perl.

Using hashes to implement a set is not exactly pretty, but it should be fast.

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5  
Using hashes to implement (not ‘simulate’) a set data type is both perfectly natural and reasonably clean in its expressivity. –  tchrist Feb 1 '11 at 4:10
    
@tchrist: the "not exactly pretty" was referring to the necessity for dummy values, as compared to e.g. the sets in Python where no dummy values are visible to the user. –  thkala Feb 1 '11 at 9:16

To find a string in a list, you could also use any in List::MoreUtils

use List::MoreUtils qw(any);

my @ducks = qw(Hughie Dewey Louis);
my $name = 'Dewey';

say 'any' if any {$name eq $_} @ducks;
share|improve this answer

If you're tied to using an array rather than a hash, you can use perl's grep function to search the array for a string.

@specialnames = qw(Hughie Dewey Louis);
while (my $value = <>) {
    if (grep {$value eq $_}, @specialnames) {
        quack() ;
    }
    elsif ($_ =~ /Donald/ {
        quack() ;
        you_re_fired_apprentice() ; # Easter egg don't tell QA
    }
}

This does scale a lot worse than a hash, and might even scale worse than copying the array into a hash and then doing hash lookups.

share|improve this answer
    
I had a recent (last 3 weeks) answer on SO that analyzed in detail what conditions prompt using which list searching techniques. –  DVK Feb 1 '11 at 2:10
1  
@DVK this one --> stackoverflow.com/questions/4678195/… ? –  Thomas L Holaday Feb 1 '11 at 13:44
    
@Thomas - Yep, thanks! –  DVK Feb 1 '11 at 16:02

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