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This is related to a previous question but I thought it would be best to split it up for searchability later.

I have a Model:

class FooModel < ActiveRecord::Base
  MONTHS = ['Jan', 'Feb', 'Mar', 'Apr', 'May', 'Jun', 'Jul', 'Aug', 'Sep']
end

I have a View:

<% form_for @foo, :url => {:action => 'bar'} do |f|%>
  <%= select :range, :thing, FooModel::MONTHS%>
  <%= f.submit "Submit" %>
<% end %>

And I have a Controller:

def index
  @foo = FooModel.new
   respond_to do |format|
      format.html # index.html.erb
   end
end

def bar
    @events = params.inspect

  respond_to do |format|
    format.html # index.html.erb
  end
end

I've tried to access the value that should be getting passed via the drop-down menu a number of different ways but it doesn't seem to be getting passed. Even calling params.inspect only sets @events equal to an empty hash. I suspect something is off with my flow or being called the wrong way or that I'm calling the wrong thing period.

Currently index is where the view up there ^^ lives and when you click on submit it calls bar. Do I need to be passing a variable in a different way? Thanks.

Update Perhaps this is a lead. I believe I have an understanding of what's going on in the model and the control but something still bugs me about the view. In <%= select :range, :thing, FooModel::MONTHS%> what do range and thing actually refer to? When I read tutorials and such online as best as I could tell these fill out the html id and name tags with values but I don't know much else. Do I need to be initializing them anywhere? Do they refer to anything in particular?

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3 Answers 3

I tried this out. I was also attempting to do the constants approach. Which worked only after I changed :month to the name of the column in the DB that was setup in my FooModel

After i got this working I wanted to move it out of constants.rb file and put it in the model. Doug was correct and saying that we could access it via FooModel::Months

So my final code looks like this in this experiment;

Model:

class FooModel < ActiveRecord::Base
  MONTHS = ['Jan', 'Feb', 'Mar', 'Apr', 'May', 'Jun', 'Jul', 'Aug', 'Sep']
end

View:

<% form_for @foo, :url => {:action => 'bar'} do |f|%>
  <%= f.select :month, options_for_select(FooModel::MONTHS)  %>
  <%= f.submit "Submit", :disable_with => "Submitting..." %>
<% end %>

Controller:

def index
  @foo = FooModel.new
   respond_to do |format|
      format.html # index.html.erb
   end
end

def bar
    @events = params.inspect

  respond_to do |format|
    format.html # index.html.erb
  end
end

At some point i could see using the constant.rb for common things like Months, Countries etc. but for this limited experiment I wanted to test it both ways. If i use the constants.rb them my View would look like below.

View if using constants.rb;

<% form_for @foo, :url => {:action => 'bar'} do |f|%>
  <%= f.select :month, options_for_select(MONTHS)  %>
  <%= f.submit "Submit", :disable_with => "Submitting..." %>
<% end %>

@hector: hope this helps.

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It's better to use a constant for this.

  1. in lib/initializers create a file called constants.rb or whatever you want
  2. Then add you constant, in your case MONTHS *see code below
  3. Then you can access that constant in the form

In config/initializers/constants.rb:

MONTHS = ['Jan', 'Feb', 'Mar', 'Apr', 'May', 'Jun', 'Jul', 'Aug', 'Sep']

In your view:

<% form_for @foo, :url => {:action => 'bar'} do |f|%>
  <%= f.select :month, options_for_select(MONTHS)  %>
  <%= f.submit "Submit", :disable_with => "Submitting..." %>
<% end %>

options_for_select just formats it for the select input.

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Make sure you restart your server. constans.rb is loaded when the server starts. –  Dark Passenger Jan 31 '11 at 22:33
    
I don't think that's the issue. I used the exact same code as the OP and my bar action populated the @events variable. –  Pan Thomakos Jan 31 '11 at 22:39
    
I put it in there as you suggested and it came back with undefined method `month' for #<FooModel:0x4cf13b8> –  hector Jan 31 '11 at 22:41
    
You need to declare months as a constant in an initializer like I pointed out :) –  Dark Passenger Feb 2 '11 at 4:48
    
@Sam - MONTHS is fine being defined in the model. It can be accessed as FooModel::MONTHS. Putting it in a separate constants file may be overkill. –  Doug R Feb 2 '11 at 21:02

Unfortunately while I liked Sam's answer and it does make some improvement to my code it ultimately wasn't the answer to my question. Frustratingly enough the answer was that in my view I had a debug line that I was using to see what output I was getting after the control would run and I was printing from the wrong variable. A simple copy/paste oversight.

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