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I'm creating an application in Qt that allows users to drag around various "modules" in a QGraphicsView. Whenever one of these modules is selected, it emits a signal which is then picked up by a "ConfigurationWidget" which is a side-panel which should display all of the relevant parameters of the selected module:

class ConfigurationWidget : public QWidget
{
  Q_OBJECT

  public:
    ConfigurationWidget(QWidget *parent) : QWidget(parent) {}  

  public slots:
    void moduleSelected(Module* m)
    {
      if(layout())
      { 
        while (itsLayout->count()>0) 
        { 
          delete itsLayout->takeAt(0); 
        }
      }
      delete layout();

      itsLayout = new QFormLayout(this);
      itsLayout->addRow(QString(tr("Type:")),     new QLabel(m->name()));
      itsLayout->addRow(QString(tr("Instance:")), new QLabel(m->instanceID()));
      // ... Display a whole bunch of other fields that depends on the module
    }
};

The problem is that the ConfigurationWidget never actually gets cleared when a module is selected. The new fields are just drawn over the old ones. I've tried various combinations of hide() and show(), invalidate(), update(), etc. to no avail.

What's the correct way to make a widget that can change its fields like this on the fly?

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2  
You should be using a QStackedWidget –  armonge Jan 31 '11 at 23:16

5 Answers 5

The code loop I've used before is as follows:

void clearLayout(QLayout *layout)
    QLayoutItem *item;
    while((item = layout->takeAt(0))) {
        if (item->layout()) {
            clearLayout(item->layout());
            delete item->layout();
        }
        if (item->widget()) {
            delete item->widget();
        }
        delete item;
    }
}

Hopefully that will be helpful to you!

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1  
I'd add if(QSpacerItem *SpacerItem = Item->spacerItem()){ delete SpacerItem; } to that as well :) –  sjwarner Oct 20 '11 at 13:49
    
Further investigation also suggests that delete item is unnecessary, as Qt handles that for us (use Qlayout::count() to verify) –  sjwarner Oct 20 '11 at 13:57
1  
You don't need the if (item->widget()). Deleting NULL is a nop. –  Timmmm Dec 9 '12 at 15:11
1  
@sjwarner that causes an error: item->spacerItem() is essentially return dynamic_cast<QSpacerItem*>(item). I.e. you'd be double freeing that block of memory. Note: I know this only empirically. –  chacham15 Apr 24 '14 at 7:30

If you transfer the layout to another widget allocated on the stack, the widgets in that layout become the children of the new widget. When the temporary object goes out of scope it destroys automatically the layout and all the widgets in it.

void moduleSelected(Module* m)
{
    if(layout())
        QWidget().setLayout(layout());

    itsLayout = new QFormLayout(this);
    itsLayout->addRow(QString(tr("Type:")),     new QLabel(m->name()));
    itsLayout->addRow(QString(tr("Instance:")), new QLabel(m->instanceID()));
    // ... Display a whole bunch of other fields that depends on the module
}
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This is insanely ugly and insanely clever simultaneously. ;) Thanks for sharing this hack. I wish there was QLayout::clear()... –  leemes Jun 15 '13 at 19:07
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks like the best way to do this is to use a QStackedLayout, as hinted at by armonge:

void ConfigurationWidget::moduleSelectedSlot(Module* m)
{
  QStackedLayout *stackedLayout = qobject_cast<QStackedLayout*>(layout());

  QWidget *layoutWidget = new QWidget(this);
  QFormLayout *formLayout = new QFormLayout(layoutWidget);
  formLayout->addRow(QString(tr("Type:")),     new QLabel(m->name()));
  formLayout->addRow(QString(tr("Instance:")), new QLabel(m->instanceID()));
  // ... Display a whole bunch of other fields that depends on the module

  delete stackedLayout->currentWidget();
  stackedLayout->addWidget(layoutWidget);
  stackedLayout->setCurrentWidget(layoutWidget);
}
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4  
When using QObject derived class, you should use qobject_cast instead of dynamic_cast: doc.qt.nokia.com/latest/qobject.html#qobject_cast –  Patrice Bernassola Feb 1 '11 at 7:38
    
@PatriceBernassola: Fixed. –  Boatzart Dec 5 '14 at 2:42

I recently run into the same problem with a QFormLayout. What worked for me (and is also in Qt's documentation: http://qt-project.org/doc/qt-5/layout.html) was the takeAt(int) method.

void clearLayout(QLayout *layout)
{
     QLayoutItem *item;
     while ((item = layout->takeAt(0)))
         delete item;
}
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Using while((item = layout->takeAt(0)))will cause warning message "Invalid index take at 0". I use count() instead

void clearLayout(QLayout *layout) 
{
    if (layout) {
        while(layout->count() > 0){
            QLayoutItem *item = layout->takeAt(0);
            delete item->widget();
            delete item;
        }
    }
}
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