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Just curious, if I wanted to send strings to a database (perhaps for MS SQL Server) can anyone provide any insight on what the best way would be to return results from a database where the result set might be sorted and "scored" on its closeness to the string passed in?

So, if I sent a query for :

SELECT name FROM table where name LIKE 'Jon'

and then get a result of 1000 results that looks like:

100 Jon
98  John
80  Jonathan
32  Nathan

Views, indexes, stored procedures, coded solution? What is the recommendation?

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3  
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Why would "Nathan" be in the result? –  RichardTheKiwi Jan 31 '11 at 23:46
    
@Mitch - how do you apply that, since a Levenshtein + LIKE will always be just Len(str) - Len(like-expr)... –  RichardTheKiwi Jan 31 '11 at 23:48
    
@cyberkiwi: did you read the wiki page? –  Mitch Wheat Jan 31 '11 at 23:49
    
@Mitch - If 2 strings are like '%JON%', JON is already part of both strings, so the Levenshtein distance is = number of chars to add = len(A)-len(B) right? I did scan the wiki but didn't see anything –  RichardTheKiwi Jan 31 '11 at 23:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could, but you'd need to use another function to do it. Levenshtein ratio or Jaro distance would be the most common solutions. I'm not sure what, if anything, SQL Server includes builtin for this. If nothing else I think you can use the SimMetrics library as described here. Regardless, it would look something like this.

select top 1000
jaro('John', name) as score, name
from table
where name like '%John%'
order by 1 desc
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Great answer for someone who has so few points on this site. Thanks. Also, thanks to cyberkiwi . –  djangofan Feb 3 '11 at 0:20

EDIT

Due to some persistent prodding from the comments, I present here an implementation of the Levenshtein distance calculation in SQL. TSQL for SQL Server 2005+ is used here, but the technique can be converted to other DBMS as well. Maximum score is 100.

;with tbl as (
    select 'Jon' AS Name union all
    select 'Jonathan' union all
    select 'Jonny' union all
    select 'John' union all
    select 'Bone' union all
    select 'BJon' union all
    select 'Nathan' union all
    select 'Jonne')
SELECT *, SCORE_Levenshtein + SCORE_SOUNDEX TotalScore
FROM
(
SELECT name,
    CAST(50 /
    (
        select 1.0 + MAX(LDist)
        FROM
        (
            select startAt.number,
                LEN(longer) -
                sum(case when SUBSTRING(longer, startAt.number+offset.number, 1)
                            = SUBSTRING(shorter, 1+offset.number, 1) then 1 else 0 end ) LDist
            FROM
            (select case when LEN(Name) < LEN(LookFor) then Name else LookFor end shorter) shorter
            cross join
            (select case when LEN(Name) >= LEN(LookFor) then Name else LookFor end longer) longer
            inner join master..spt_values startAt
                on startAt.type='P' and startAt.number between 1 and len(longer) - LEN(shorter) + 1
            inner join master..spt_values offset
                on offset.type='P' and offset.number between 0 and LEN(shorter)-1
            group by startAt.number, longer, shorter
        ) X
    ) AS NUMERIC(16,4)) SCORE_Levenshtein
    ,
    CAST(50 / (5-  -- inversely proportional to soundex difference
    (
    SELECT 0.0 +
    case when Substring(A,1,1)=Substring(B,1,1) then 1 else 0 end
    +
    case when Substring(A,2,1)=Substring(B,2,1) then 1 else 0 end
    +
    case when Substring(A,3,1)=Substring(B,3,1) then 1 else 0 end
    +
    case when Substring(A,4,1)=Substring(B,4,1) then 1 else 0 end
    FROM (select soundex(name) as A, SOUNDEX(LookFor) as B) X
    )) AS NUMERIC(16,4)) AS SCORE_SOUNDEX
FROM tbl
CROSS JOIN (SELECT 'Jon' as LookFor) LookFor
) Scored
Order by SCORE_Levenshtein + SCORE_SOUNDEX DESC

Note - This line CROSS JOIN (SELECT 'Jon' as LookFor) LookFor is used so that the input 'Jon' does not need to be repeated many times in the query. One could also define a variable instead and use it where LookFor is used in the query.

Output

It is worth noting that together with SOUNDEX, Jonny gets to score higher than Bone which won't happen with Levenshtein alone.

name      SCORE_Levenshtein  SCORE_SOUNDEX   TotalScore
Jon       50.0000            50.0000         100.0000
John      12.5000            50.0000          62.5000
Jonny      8.3333            50.0000          58.3333
Jonne      8.3333            50.0000          58.3333
Bone      10.0000            25.0000          35.0000
BJon      10.0000            12.5000          22.5000
Jonathan   5.5556            16.6667          22.2223
Nathan     7.1429            12.5000          19.6429


Original answer follows, based on pre-filtering the input based on LIKE '%x%' which collapses the Levenshtein to a simple Len(column) - Len(Like-expression) calculation

Have a look at this example - it tests the length and SOUNDEX differences, for lack of better measures.

The maximum score is 100.

;with tbl as (
    select 'Jon' AS Name union all
    select 'Jonathan' union all
    select 'Jonny' union all
    select 'John' union all  -- doesn't match LIKE
    select 'BJon' union all
    select 'Jonne')
SELECT name,
     50 / (Len(Name) - LEN('Jon') + 1.0)  -- inversely proportional to length difference
     +
     50 / (5-  -- inversely proportional to soundex difference
    (
    SELECT 0.0 +
    case when Substring(A,1,1)=Substring(B,1,1) then 1 else 0 end
    +
    case when Substring(A,2,1)=Substring(B,2,1) then 1 else 0 end
    +
    case when Substring(A,3,1)=Substring(B,3,1) then 1 else 0 end
    +
    case when Substring(A,4,1)=Substring(B,4,1) then 1 else 0 end
    FROM (select soundex(name) as A, SOUNDEX('Jon') as B) X
    )) AS SCORE
FROM tbl
where name LIKE '%Jon%'
Order by SCORE DESC

Output

name     SCORE
Jon      100.00000000000000000
Jonny    66.66666666666660000
Jonne    66.66666666666660000
BJon     37.50000000000000000
Jonathan 24.99999999999996666
share|improve this answer
    
I love the way you critise the applicability of Levenstein distance and then present a poor SOUNDEX implementation! –  Mitch Wheat Feb 1 '11 at 0:01
    
    
@Mitch - let's see your constructive answer –  RichardTheKiwi Feb 1 '11 at 0:07
    
I already did. its in the comments to the OP. –  Mitch Wheat Feb 1 '11 at 0:09

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