Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know there are many methods like setTimeout, but I just want a REAL one.

I'm using JavaScript to write a compiler, and I have to find out a way to implement the sleep() function. I know that buggy loop way, it's not what I want.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
By real, you mean? What are you design reqs? –  Jared Farrish Feb 1 '11 at 2:57
5  
Why would you need to sleep() while compiling code? –  Metal Feb 1 '11 at 2:59
    
This is a bad idea if you're planning to run this code in a browser and your goal isn't to freeze the UI. –  ide Feb 1 '11 at 3:00
1  
I'm writing a compiler, and the original language has a sleep() function. –  Xhacker Liu Feb 1 '11 at 3:01
    
Is Javascript your development language for the compiler or your target environment? In other words, are you just writing the compiler in Javascript, or will the compiler generate Javascript as its "machine language" to be run in a browser or other JS runtime? –  paxdiablo Feb 1 '11 at 3:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

From the answers above i gather that you want a sleep function that doesnt freeze the browser and doesnt use setTimeout.

Good luck with that, javascript is single threaded. This is NOT possible

share|improve this answer
    
Single threaded javascript === Cannot sleep thread without blocking. –  Raynos Feb 1 '11 at 3:17
    
Do you know something like Concurrent.Thread? –  Xhacker Liu Feb 1 '11 at 3:20
    
@Xhacker he just said javscript is single-threaded, which means it has absolutely no conception of threads or concurrency whatsoever. :D –  Gordon Gustafson Feb 1 '11 at 13:33

You can't, at least in most browser implementations. You'll have to make your compiler work around that. StratifiedJS does something similar.

I'll add some more detail. This, obviously, is not the best way to implement a sleep function, but since you said you're doing a simple drawing language, I'll just go with this:

Imagine you have some code like this:

drawLine(1, 2, 3, 4);
sleep(1000);
drawLine(5, 6, 7, 8);

That could be converted into this by breaking up all the sleeps:

var pieces;
function advance() {
    pieces.shift()();
}
pieces=[
    function() {
        drawLine(1, 2, 3, 4);
        setTimeout(advance, 1000);
    },
    function() {
        drawLine(5, 6, 7, 8);
    }
];
advance();

Or, if your language is more complex than that, you could do this with more complexity for the compiler (this is the obvious solution):

drawLine(1, 2, 3, 4);
setTimeout(function() {
    drawLine(5, 6, 7, 8);
}, 1000);

Again, this may not be applicable if your language gets very complex, but it may be helpful as a starting point.

share|improve this answer
    
So you mean I can't implement the sleep() function? –  Xhacker Liu Feb 1 '11 at 3:10
1  
@Xhacker Liu: That's what I'm saying. You can, however, make your compiler convert the synchronous code into asynchronous code, therefore avoiding the issue. –  icktoofay Feb 1 '11 at 3:11
    
Why does everyone still think that every Javascript program runs in a browser? :-) –  paxdiablo Feb 1 '11 at 3:12
    
@paxdiablo: No, I'm aware that there are other implementations. That's why I said "at least in most browser implementations". –  icktoofay Feb 1 '11 at 3:13
    
icktoofay's solution is correct. You're in charge of the compiler in this scenario so I would have it generate continuations and implement sleeping via setTimeout. –  ide Feb 1 '11 at 3:14

Sounds to me like you want to take a block loop

while(condition) {
    // do something
    sleep(x);
}

and turn it into

function foo(values) {
    if(condition) {
         // do something
         setTimeout(function() {
            foo(values); 
         }, x);
    }
}
foo(someValue);

Also you can take a for loop

for (var i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    // do something
    sleep(x);
}

and turn it into

function foo(i) {
    // do something
    i++;
    if (i < n) {
        setTimeout(function() {
            foo(i);
        }, x);
    }
}
foo(0);

Basically turn your loops into recursive calls then replace your sleeps with asynchrous recursive calls.

In a loop you need to physically block to slow down the step. In recursion you can delay the call to the next recursive function.

share|improve this answer

The only real and reasonable way to implement sleep() in JavaScript (at least in the browser environment) is to use setTimeout. Just process your compiled instructions one by one, and then take a break when you encounter the sleep instruction:

function resume() {
    while (instructions.length) {
        var instruction = instructions.shift();

        switch (instruction.opcode) {
        case "foo":
            doFoo(instruction.operands);
            break;
        case "bar":
            doBar(instruction.operands);
            break;
        case "sleep":
            doSleep(instruction.operands);
            return; // pause running
        }
    }
}

function doSleep(operands) {
    setTimeout(resume, operands[0]);
}

var instructions = compile(source);
resume();
share|improve this answer

If you just want to call a function in X milliseconds you can use setTimeout, but you knew that.

You can hack things together using Date and getTime.

function sleep(milliseconds) {
    var now = new Date();
    var exitTime = now.getTime() + milliseconds;
    while (true) {
        now = new Date();
        if (now.getTime() > exitTime)
        return;
    }
}

stolen from here

However you are totally freezing the current thread for a possible long period of time. I think you would basically be stopping all javscript action on the page for X milliseconds, which would be very annoying if the time is greater than 300ms.

there's some pretty good analysis of javscript sleep methods here.

If you give us a little more context we can probably be more helpful. Sleep is usually used in multithreaded scenarios in other languages, which is exactly why is was left out of javascript. What features do you need in your compiler? :D

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but it's not what i want...It's a CPU burner. –  Xhacker Liu Feb 1 '11 at 3:03
    
cpu hog [more chars] –  Thomas Eding Feb 1 '11 at 3:04
    
@Xhacker what DO you want? At this point all we can do is guess. Why do you need the sleep? What are your requirements? :D –  Gordon Gustafson Feb 1 '11 at 3:06
    
I want to design a simple script language, the main feature is to draw basic graphic. With a sleep function, it can make some simple animation. –  Xhacker Liu Feb 1 '11 at 3:13
    
@XhackerLiu why use sleep instead of delay(recursiveCallback). Don't treat javascript like C ! –  Raynos Feb 1 '11 at 3:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.