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How do I select 5 rows, 1 for each site_id, this is throwing an error

SELECT DISTINCT site_id, * 
FROM deal 
WHERE site_id IN (2, 3, 4, 5, 6) 
ORDER BY id 
DESC LIMIT 5

You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near '* FROM deal WHERE site_id IN (2, 3, 4, 5, 6) ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 5' at line 1"

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try using GROUP BY

SELECT * 
FROM deal 
WHERE site_id IN (2, 3, 4, 5, 6) 
GROUP BY site_id
ORDER BY id DESC
LIMIT 5;
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Doh! Duh, I should've thought of this! –  Webnet Feb 1 '11 at 3:34
    
Pretty good. Note that SELECTing columns that aren't in the GROUP_BY is a MYSQL extension, and there's no guarantee about which rows are returned. (So if he wants the one with the maximum ID, there's no guarantee he'll get it.) –  Ken Bloom Feb 1 '11 at 3:36
    
@Ken you're right - if he wants more than just one row, any row for each site id, then your solution is what he needs. –  Michael Robinson Feb 1 '11 at 4:33

If your table allows duplicate site_ids, and you only need to show one per site_id, then assuming ID is unique

SELECT * FROM deal
WHERE id in (
    SELECT max(id) maxid
    FROM deal
    WHERE site_id IN (2, 3, 4, 5, 6)
    GROUP by site_id
)
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First get one particular deal ids (the maximum one) for each site. (The inner query.) Then get the full row for each of those deal ids. (The outer query.)

SELECT * FROM deal
WHERE id in (
    SELECT max(id) maxid
    FROM deal
    WHERE site_id IN (2, 3, 4, 5, 6)
    GROUP_BY site_id
)

You can remove following line if you're really interested in getting one row for each site for all of the sites in the database.

     WHERE site_id IN (2, 3, 4, 5, 6)
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Why only select the max id? –  Brent Friar Feb 1 '11 at 4:00
    
@Brent: #1: I'm fixing up cyberkiwi's answer. #2: you gotta pick a specific one somehow. #3: I assume that the purpose of ORDER BY id in the query posted in the question was to get the maximum id (though from the looks of it, if his query could be made to work, it would actually use min(id) instead.) –  Ken Bloom Feb 1 '11 at 4:14
    
Ok, I thought I might have missed something. The original question was a little ambiguous. I suspect that site_id is unique so none of the additional conditions would be needed. –  Brent Friar Feb 1 '11 at 4:24

You can't specify DISTINCT site_id and also include the * wildcard. If you want to specify the distinct site_id, then you need to remove the wildcard and specify the other fields you want to use.

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-1: you've identified the problem. Now can you tell him how to solve it? –  Ken Bloom Feb 1 '11 at 3:35
    
I thought I was pretty specific - If you want to specify the distinct site_id, then you need to remove the wildcard and specify the other fields you want to use. Since I do not know which fields he wants to use I can only give him instructions. Either remove the wildcard, or remove the distinct site_id. –  Brent Friar Feb 1 '11 at 3:39
    
If he specifies the other fields, then he gets distinct values over all of them (even if the site id is duplicated). It's possible to use DISTINCT * in SQL, which gets you all distinct rows, so I suspect the syntax problem is in the site_id, * (where site_id is already covered by the *) –  Ken Bloom Feb 1 '11 at 3:42
    
Correct, the problem is with distinct site_id, * so one or the other needs to be removed. If site_id is duplicated then it would make sense to use distinct site_id, field_1, field_2. If site_id is unique then he would only need * as in the selected answer. –  Brent Friar Feb 1 '11 at 3:51
    
@Brent: distinct site_id, field_1, field_2 will give you multiple copies of the same site_id if the same site_id has two different field_1 values. (However, you did state that your assumption is that site_id is distinct over the whole table, in which case I can't understand why you need select distinct in the first place.) –  Ken Bloom Feb 1 '11 at 4:28

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