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 class CreateTestings < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    create_table :testings do |t|
      t.string "name"
      t.boolean "visible"
      t.string "description"
      t.integer "roll"
      t.references "students"
      t.timestamps
    end
  end

  def self.down
     drop_table :testings
  end
end

Hello, i just ran this test migration to see how Rails handles Migrations. Even though i have t.references "students"

Rails created the students_id in my testings table successfully but however didn't specified any foreign key on it:

mysql> DESC testings;
+-------------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field       | Type         | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+-------------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| id          | int(11)      | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| name        | varchar(255) | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| visible     | tinyint(1)   | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| description | varchar(255) | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| roll        | int(11)      | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| students_id | int(11)      | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| created_at  | datetime     | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| updated_at  | datetime     | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
+-------------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

Is this how Rails works or otherwise i should've had

t.references :student instead of t.references "students"

Thanks!

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is how rails works. It doesn't specify foreign key dependencies in its migrations. You'll have to do this manually with an 'execute' command and SQL code if you do want to specify foreign-key dependencies.

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I would assume if Rails works that way, it would be fine to do it Rails way??? –  Jasdeep Singh Feb 1 '11 at 4:07
    
That depends on your business needs and if you want to duplicate these constraints in your database layer. Your application will function properly and transactions will work as intended in mysql even without the foreign key dependency. –  Pan Thomakos Feb 1 '11 at 4:08
    
+1 this is just how Rails works. See this paragraph of the Rails guides for a bit of an explanation: Active Record and Referential Integrity. –  Daniel Pietzsch Feb 1 '11 at 4:31
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