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Crystal Reports? SQL Server Reporting Services? A 3rd-party tool?

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Is this a real question? It is obvious that nobody cares about crystal reports, otherwise this would have been closed within minutes as a 'non-programming' and 'subjective' one! –  Philippe Grondier Jan 29 '09 at 23:56
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15 answers, 4 favourites. I guess somebody cares. –  Barry Fandango May 13 '09 at 19:33
    
I only have experience with Telerik Reporting, which I have found to be very easy to use and powerful enough for my needs. –  Kevin Babcock Aug 21 '09 at 1:38
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21 Answers 21

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I feel like SSRS 2008 gives you the most flexibility - every property, every field, every element is extensible through the expression language. You can write .net assemblies to call into from expressions and if you need more power they provide several interfaces for extending security, data processing and rendering.

Best of all it is 'free' when you have SQL Server.

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Best of all, it is included in SQL Express 2008 with Advanced Services and it is really free, with some limitations -- cannot connect to remote databases, no management console, no remote report editor. –  Tiberiu Ana May 20 '09 at 11:23
    
Free when it is on the same server, right? Otherwise you are stuck with additional licensing fees; at least this was the case with 2005. –  schultkl Nov 18 '09 at 5:00
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My current contract customer is using Jasper Reports with good results

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I have used SQL reporting services, Crystal reports, MS Access and a few other application specific reporting tools and SQL reporting is definitely my favourite. Does lean more towards developers than users but its power and flexibility is unsurpassed...oh yes and the cost (free) is a big plus as well.

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To the guy who said this:

Crystal is good. Every software has it's quirks but Crystal generally is an industry standard.

You can:

•deliver reports in many ways (web, email, pdf, to html, etc), •use their enterprise server edition to automate delivery and running of reports, •they have superb developer tools compared to most other reporting engines, •they are the built-in .Net reporting engine. •Their ide isn't that bad and they have good scriptability. Adding barcodes is easy with something like idautomation's ufl library. •their developer kit allows you to compile their report engine into your apps, be it web, or executeable for $8-900. Sql Server reports are new and if they can deliver the most complex reports you'll ever need someday, today, then use it. I am sure in some time they'll have a lot more features than they do now, but CR seems to have the lead in the feature area.

Yeah, if only SSRS did all of those things..pity. Are you kidding me? Everything you mentioned in your bullet list is in the box with SSRS.

and "SQL Server reports are new"??..if nearly 10 years is your definition of new..yeah, i guess. Granted you wrote your answer 1 year ago..but it was very wrong then. Would have been wrong 5 years ago too.

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I've downvoted you -- Stackoverflow values politeness. –  Warren May 30 '10 at 22:06
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Crystal is good. Every software has it's quirks but Crystal generally is an industry standard.

You can:

  • deliver reports in many ways (web, email, pdf, to html, etc),
  • use their enterprise server edition to automate delivery and running of reports,
  • they have superb developer tools compared to most other reporting engines,
  • they are the built-in .Net reporting engine.
  • Their ide isn't that bad and they have good scriptability. Adding barcodes is easy with something like idautomation's ufl library.
  • their developer kit allows you to compile their report engine into your apps, be it web, or executeable for $8-900.

Sql Server reports are new and if they can deliver the most complex reports you'll ever need someday, today, then use it. I am sure in some time they'll have a lot more features than they do now, but CR seems to have the lead in the feature area.

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My preferred reporting tool is Excel, it may seem a bit odd to use Excel, but if you look from the users perspective this is the tool they prefer to work with. I’ve learned that that independently of the technology used to generate reports, invariably the data in those repots end up in Excel. So why not generate Excel spreadsheets directly, width rich functionality embedded.

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How do you get the data into the spreadsheet? Save As off of a query? –  jcollum Oct 30 '09 at 4:55
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I use Crystal Reports 2008. Prior to that I used CR XI. Not sure why there's so much hate for it. Yes, merge modules are a PITA when attempting to serve them up on an intranet, but the functionality of CR2008 makes it a very good choice for reporting.

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I agree. It's not perfect, but it's very, very capable. –  Jas Panesar Jan 28 '09 at 17:50
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I use i-net Crystal-Clear (compatible to Crystal Reports). It has the same features or more and it is:

  • platform independent. If you want support another platform in the future this is not a problem.
  • it is DBMS independent. The same report can be run on different DBMS without problems. You need only change a central connection configuration and not the report templates.
  • it has a very good i18n support if you want reporting for different locales now or in the future.

That I think i-net Crystal-Clear is more flexible.

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I have used both Business Objects (Crystal Reports) and SSRS (2005 and 2008). For maximum flexibility I probably would tend to favor SSRS. With SSRS you get the choice of running the reports locally (runs on application server/IIS) or on the server (Reporting Services).

With local reports, you can dynamically generate the Report Definition (RDL) if you want maximum flexibility. For server reports, most elements on the report can be expressions including the fields themselves which could be "indexed".

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Crystal's a pain to use. If you are using SQL Server anyway, SQL Server Reports is pretty nice.

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Crystal, on top of being a pain, is also a waste of (everybody's) time..you make it work..then 1 change will mean you have to do work on it again..hard to see the point.. –  Ric Tokyo Jan 28 '09 at 0:32
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I've been using Reporting Services quite a bit and am finding it to be fairly easy to use, especially if you already use it in house and use the Microsoft development platforms. Recently I've been building reports that use OLEDB to connect to an AS400 server, and stream them from the Reports Web Service back to the appliaction to be rendered as a PDF or Excel file.

Reporting services also seems to be steadily improving with each new release. I'd like to think that this will only become easier to use with more advanced tools in the future. It also seems like it is capable of being integrated into just about every Microsoft product these days and fits the direction they are headed.

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I've been using Reporting Services 2005.

I'd use 2008 (seems to be more flexible and powerful for things like charts), but my work hasn't upgraded yet.

The worst one I've had to use is MYOB clarity

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XML+XSLT+XSL+Apache FOP

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+1 for wishful thinking. The productivity of doing things this way, even after the learning curve, is nowhere close a proper reporting solution. –  Tiberiu Ana May 20 '09 at 11:26
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I've used SSRS, Crystal Reports in VB6 and C#, and Business Objects.

SSRS is great if you are after something that is a good fit with your other Microsoft developments.

To be honest, every large reporting system has its problems when you get to the nitty gritty, and the hope is that MS will invest in it enough to overcome these. Since MS are making cutbacks, I'm not sure how likely this is.

I had a love/hate relationship with all the reporting technologies I've used, but so far my personal preference is SSRS, due to the ease of customisation with formulae, very good integration with SQL server and Visual studio, and the fact that I haven't worked with it as long as the others yet :-)

I particularly like the integrated Dundas charting controls available in SSRS 2008.

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SQL Server Reporting Services also exposes 2 web services, which enables us to invoke and execute reports. For one of our projects; we use the web services to execute reports and export them as pdf in asp.net.

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Used Reporting Services 2005 reason it is for free and integrated nice in Sharepoint

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I use XtraReports from DevExpress

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I'm using RAQ Report. RAQ Report is a free excel-like java reporting tool.

RAQ Report has such features:

1.Excel-like Interface, Easy to Learn

2.Import Excel, Precisely Export Excel

3.Original Data Input Method

4.Pure Html report, Only Need Browser

5.Unique Cross Tab and Any Type Report

6.Publish Reports to Excel/Word/PDF

7.Easily Integrate With J2EE Application

8.Supports Any Popular Data Source

9.Featured Preformatted Paper Printing

10.Totally Free for using and deployment

11.In Time Forum and Email Support

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Check out VersaReports' Universal Report Server. We have an Enterprise-class report server that works with any report designer you want to use.

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Well it is not so much about what I would prefer and more about what my users do.

I do like Crystal but in my experience in many offices users are more familiar with Excel thus they use Crystal for only to retrieve the data from the database then export it to Excel to work with the data (making charts etc).

In terms of developing applications I think (as a .NET developer) Crystal is an obvious choice due to the Crystal support built into Visual Studio. It is easy to implement, user friendly and easy to deploy.

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To answer this question you must first understand that there are two types of reporting users: casual users and power users. Casual users, which typically make up 80% or more of the people in an organization, include executives, managers, staff, and business analysts. Power users, making up less than 20%, include IT developers, super users, and analytical modelers.

Power users have no problem working with Crystal Reports because they understand database design, structures, relationships, joins, and SQL commands. To a casual user, on the other hand, this is beyond thier expertise.

Look at solutions like Stonefield Query. Stonefield Query is designed specifically for the casual user. It gives them the ability to create their own ad-hoc queries and reports, production reports, and parameterized reports from scratch without needing to know anything about programming.

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