Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

ok what im trying to do is makeing something so i can call it like $this->model->users->getInfomation('name'); or something similer on my framework but php give me a strict standards Creating default object from empty value

protected function model($model)
{
    $path = "features". DS ."models". DS . $model .".php";
    require $path;

    $class = 'Model'. ucfirst($model);
    $this->model->$model = new $class;
}

can we make it so it will somehow fit in the standards ?

edit*

this function is in class Application so i can extend them from our controller like blog Extends Application then call something like $this->model->blog will get something like what im doing above, when i do something like

protected function model($model)
{
    $path = "features". DS ."models". DS . $model .".php";
    require $path;

    $class = 'Model'. ucfirst($model);
    $this->$model = new $class;
}

yes the above code works fine $this->blog->getSomething();, but somehow i want to make them in a group, like the question above, so if we want to get something like $this->model->blog->getSomething();

Thanks for the time.

Adam Ramadhan

share|improve this question
    
I don't really know what are you trying to achieve. You want to model be automatically created when you calling $this->model->[modelName] ? –  singles Feb 1 '11 at 8:12
    
yes but the problem is maybe because of the $this->model is empty, i haven't made it anywhere. cant we just add that ? –  Adam Ramadhan Feb 1 '11 at 8:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It's hard to see what you're actually doing wrong with that code alone. I've made some very simple code to reproduce the error:

<?php
$bar = 42;
$foo = null;

$foo->bar = $bar;

The reason it gives this warning, is that you're assigning values the "object way", but you're assigning it to a variable that isn't an object. By doing this, the Zend engine actually creates an object for $foo, which is an instance of StdClass. Obviously, 9 out of 10 times, this isn't what you want to do, so PHP provides a helpful message.

In your case: $this->model isn't an object (yet). If you want to get rid of the error, just do:

if( !is_object( $this->model ) ) {
    $this->model = new StdClass;
}
$this->model->$model = new $class;

Cheers.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah this one work, but if( !is_object( $this->model ) ) is giveing me an error $this->model not found, if i remove the is object it works fine!. anway what is a std class ? –  Adam Ramadhan Feb 1 '11 at 8:34
1  
You can find more information on that here at stackoverflow: stackoverflow.com/questions/931407/what-is-stdclass-in-php If you haven't defined $this->model, perhaps it is time to do so, instead of relying on all sorts of magic? –  Berry Langerak Feb 1 '11 at 9:53
    
anyway after doing some research im using this for now, ill change the answer if there is a better one :D thanks. –  Adam Ramadhan Feb 5 '11 at 7:21
    
+1 for is_object(). For C# developer this is very strange -) –  trailmax Dec 21 '12 at 1:19

You must use __get magic method - http://php.net/manual/pl/language.oop5.magic.php

You can achieve what you're looking for doing something like that:

<?php
class ModelCreator
{
    private $_modelsCreated = array();
    public function __get($model)
    {
        $class = 'Model'. ucfirst($model);
        //avoid creating multiple same models
        if (!array_key_exists($model, $this->_modelsCreated)) {
            $path = "features". DS ."models". DS . $model .".php";
            require_once 'modeluser.php';
            $this->_modelsCreated[$class] = new $class;
        }
        return $this->_modelsCreated[$class];
    }
}

class MyClass
{
    private $_model;

    public function __construct(ModelCreator $model)
    {
        $this->_model = $model;
    }

    public function __get($name) 
    {
        if ($name === 'model') {
            return $this->_model;
        }
    }
}  

$myClass = new MyClass(new ModelCreator());
$userModel = $myClass->model->user; // will return a class of ModelUser

But you should avoid magic like above -> better approach is to do it that way:

//model creator is an instance of model creator
$this->modelCreator->getModel('user'); // now you know what exactly is happening
share|improve this answer
    
thanks singles! yes it work too!, im waiting for a simpler solution. –  Adam Ramadhan Feb 1 '11 at 8:39
    
If you want models to be created dynamically at your request and use properties instead of methods to retrieve them I doubt, is there simpler solution. –  singles Feb 1 '11 at 8:43
1  
there is no simpler solution there is a design pattern that handles unique object instances and it is called a multiton (something like this model creator here).You can call it a collection of singletons. Stick to the book, trying to makes things simpler than they are might can create strange behavior, as you've already found out.Good example singles. –  Catalin Marin Feb 1 '11 at 9:13
    
That's not the reason for his error message though. I do agree that this code is actually better than the one that he's using right now, although a simple Registry would do for his situation just as well? –  Berry Langerak Feb 1 '11 at 9:56

Must use double $'s

$this->model->$$model = new $class;
share|improve this answer
    
well as i know $$ means like this $this->model->$blog ? so it give us an error that $blog doesnt exist. what im looking for is something that can give me $this->model->blog from $this->model->$model; but the problem is $this->model i haven't made anything to this. please correct me if i am wrong. –  Adam Ramadhan Feb 1 '11 at 8:15
    
You don't have an object on this->model? Then you shouldn't expect it to work .. –  yoda Feb 1 '11 at 8:16
    
Also, $$ means that where you have $$model, it will stick the name of the variable (e.g. if $model is "person", it will be $this->model->person). Tested and working. –  yoda Feb 1 '11 at 8:24

In addition to Berry Langerak's answer

is_object will still trigger the strict check since it assumes there is 'something' in $this->model. isset is a better approach

if( !isset( $this->model ) ) {
    $this->model = new StdClass;
}

$this->model->$model = new $class;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.