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   class Outer {

      class Inner {
          public:
              Inner() {}
              void func() ;
      };

  private:
      static const char* const MYCONST;
      int var;

  };

  void Outer::Inner::func() {
      var = 1;
  } 

  const char* const Outer::MYCONST = "myconst";

This errors out when I compile with class Outer::Inner' has no member named `var'

share|improve this question

An inner class is a friend of the class it is defined within.
So, yes; an object of type Outer::Inner can access the member variable var of an object of type Outer.

Unlike Java though, there is no correlation between an object of type Outer::Inner and an object of the parent class. You have to make the parent child relationship manually.

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

class Outer
{
    class Inner
    {
        public:
            Inner(Outer& x): parent(x) {}
            void func()
            {
                std::string a = "myconst1";
                std::cout << parent.var << std::endl;

                if (a == MYCONST)
                {   std::cout << "string same" << std::endl;
                }
                else
                {   std::cout << "string not same" << std::endl;
                }
            }
        private:
            Outer&  parent;
    };

    public:
        Outer()
            :i(*this)
            ,var(4)
        {}
        Outer(Outer& other)
            :i(other)
            ,var(22)
        {}
        void func()
        {
            i.func();
        }
    private:
        static const char* const MYCONST;
        Inner i;
        int var;
};

const char* const Outer::MYCONST = "myconst";

int main()
{

    Outer           o1;
    Outer           o2(o1);
    o1.func();
    o2.func();
}
share|improve this answer
8  
Technically in the current C++ standard, a nested class does NOT have special access to its enclosing class. See sec 11.8.1 of the standard. HOWEVER see also this standard defect: open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/cwg_defects.html#45 – Greg Rogers Mar 9 '09 at 20:13
1  
For what its worth, GCC follows the proposed resolution given there, other compilers probably do too. – Greg Rogers Mar 9 '09 at 20:13
9  
The C+11 standard is now compliant with the above description. – Loki Astari Apr 23 '13 at 21:20
1  
In Java, non-static inner class is implicitly given a reference (pointer) to the instance of its outer class when the inner class is first accessed. To rephrase this, jvm is implicitly writing a code for you that is similar to what @LokiAstari shown us in his answer. Here's an excerpt from Effective Java 2nd Ed "Item 22: Favor static member classes over nonstatic": "If you omit this modifier (static keyword when declaring inner class), each instance will have an extraneous reference to its enclosing instance". – David Lee Jul 1 '14 at 16:28
1  
@Loki Astari: I read the last sentence "You have to make the parent child relationship manually" and interpreted the code fragment that followed as an example of how to do that correctly! – Brent Baccala Jan 20 at 22:01

An inner class has access to all members of the outer class, but it does not have an implicit reference to a parent class instance (unlike some weirdness with Java). So if you pass a reference to the outer class to the inner class, it can reference anything in the outer class instance.

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2  
this is true from c++11 – thrantir Jul 7 '14 at 8:08

Anything that is part of Outer should have access to all of Outer's members, public or private.

Edit: your compiler is correct, var is not a member of Inner. But if you have a reference or pointer to an instance of Outer, it could access that.

share|improve this answer

var is not a member of inner class.

To access var, a pointer or reference to an outer class instance should be used. e.g. pOuter->var will work if the inner class is a friend of outer, or, var is public, if one follows C++ standard strictly.

Some compilers treat inner classes as the friend of the outer, but some may not. See this document for IBM compiler:

"A nested class is declared within the scope of another class. The name of a nested class is local to its enclosing class. Unless you use explicit pointers, references, or object names, declarations in a nested class can only use visible constructs, including type names, static members, and enumerators from the enclosing class and global variables.

Member functions of a nested class follow regular access rules and have no special access privileges to members of their enclosing classes. Member functions of the enclosing class have no special access to members of a nested class."

share|improve this answer
    
Wrong. See other answers - 3 years earlier. "if one follows C++ standard strictly", they reach different answers from yours. As of an early draft for C++11, nested classes can access all members of the parent via a reference/pointer. There is no requirement to explicitly declare friend or public. Who cares if IBM were wrong/outdated, in the past, at a dead link? This answer was already out of date 3 years before it was posted. – underscore_d Dec 4 '15 at 20:26

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