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Initially i have following code.

var list = new Dictionary<string, int>();
list.Add("abcd", 1);
list.Add("abc", 12);
list.Add("def", 14);

//Finding items on this list is simple.

var results = list.Where(p => p.Value.Equals("abc"));

Here comes my question.

If i have a list of search words, how to search those items in list. I don't want to use for loop for this. Is there any built-in functionality or I need to write an extension method?

List<string> searchList = new List<string>();
searchList.Add("abc") ;
searchList.Add("def") ;

Find all items in searchList in list

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should "abc" in you search list match both "abc" and "abcd"? –  Matt Ellen Feb 1 '11 at 10:56
    
@Matt Ellenyes yes –  Adeel Feb 1 '11 at 10:58
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use IEqualityComparer interface:

public class EqualityComparer : IEqualityComparer<string>
{

    public bool Equals(string x, string y)
    {
        return y.Contains(x);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(string obj)
    {
        return obj.GetHashCode();
    }
}

Then use it:

        HashSet<string> searchList = new HashSet<string>();
        searchList.Add("abc");
        searchList.Add("def");

        var list = new Dictionary<string, int>();
        list.Add("abcd", 1);
        list.Add("abc", 12);
        list.Add("def abc", 14);
        list.Add("test test", 15);

        var lst = list.Where(p => searchList.Contains(p.Key, new EqualityComparer()));

As @Ani said this equality is not good you can also do:

var lst1 = list.Where(p => searchList.Any(x => p.Key.Contains(x)));

Just add null checkings yourself.

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I would strongly caution against writing such an IEqualityComparer. It fails a property as basic as symmetry: Equals(a, b) => Equals(b, a). –  Ani Feb 1 '11 at 10:52
    
@Ani, this is equality implicitly defined by question, I don't know there is better solution with this order and saving this equality or not (and I didn't think about it), I know you want to refer me to msdn, but this equality used for this purpose and with name line ContainEquality it will be distinguished from general equality. –  Saeed Amiri Feb 1 '11 at 10:58
    
Sure; I just thought it was important for readers to note. They might run into problems if they used it for some other purpose. –  Ani Feb 1 '11 at 11:00
1  
@Ani, I added another way :) –  Saeed Amiri Feb 1 '11 at 11:02
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I'd recommend using a HashSet for your searchList and then doing something like this:

HashSet<string> searchList = new HashSet<string>();
searchList.Add("abc");
searchList.Add("def");

var list = new Dictionary<string, int>();
list.Add("abcd", 1);
list.Add("abc", 12);
list.Add("def", 14);

list.Where(p => searchList.Contains(p.Key));

This will prevent an O(n) operation on the searchList for each execution of the Where clause as the lookup should be close to O(1)

share|improve this answer
    
it is matching the content with search item, so if list has "abc def" and searchList has item "def", it did not find it. –  Adeel Feb 1 '11 at 10:29
    
I see, then I think the approach here is incorrect. If you need to have a proper searching algorithm, I'd rethink this approach and potentially looking at having a simple indexing of your searchable items. –  Ray Booysen Feb 1 '11 at 10:47
    
yes i knew it. Thanks –  Adeel Feb 1 '11 at 10:49
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