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Consider the class below. If I run Findbugs against it it will give me an error ("Non-transient non-serializable instance field in serializable class") on line 5 but not on line 7.

1 public class TestClass implements Serializable {
2
3  private static final long serialVersionUID = 1905162041950251407L;
4
5  private Set<Integer> mySet;      // Finsbugs error
6
7  private HashSet<Integer> myOtherSet;
8
9 }

That's correct because java.util.Set never implements Serializable in its hierarchy and java.util.HashSet does. However it is best practice to code against interfaces instead of concrete implementations.

How can I best handle this?

I can add a @Suppresswarnings(justification="No bug", values="SE_BAD_FIELD") on line 3. I have quite a lot of Sets and Lists in my actual code and I'm affraid it litter my code too much.

Are there better ways?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

However it is best practice to code against interfaces instead of concrete implementations.

I submit that no, in this case it is not. Findbugs quite correctly tells you that you risk running into a NotSerializableException as soon as you have a non-serializable Set implementation in that field. This is something you should deal with. How, that depends on the design of your classes.

  • If those collections are initialized within the class and never set from outside, then I see absolutely nothing wrong with declaring the concrete type for the field, since fields are implementation details anyway. Do use the interface type in the public interface.
  • If the collection are passed into the class via a public interface, you have to verify that they are in fact Serializable. To do that, create an interface SerializableSet extends Set, Serializable and use it for your field. Then, either:
    • Use SerializableSet in the public interface. The problem is that you can then not use that interface with a plain Set.
    • Check collections passed to the class via instanceof Serializable and throw an exception if they're not, otherwise cast them to SerializableSet
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2  
ew. i dislike using a concrete type, even in this situation. i think this is a safely ignorable warning. the only part you might need to worry about is if you truly have arbitrary code setting this collection which might set it to a non-serializable set instance. –  jtahlborn Feb 1 '11 at 12:17
4  
@Michael using the concrete type internally may not be a "problem", but i think it's a bad practice. and even if it is set externally, you would only have to worry if you might be dealing with code outside of your control. i feel that in this situation, the cleanliness of the design (using the interface) outweighs the (theoretical) usefulness of this warning. –  jtahlborn Feb 1 '11 at 12:49
3  
I agree with @jtahlborn . You can't make every method accept only HashSet when you really need a set. Callers shouldn't be required to pass an HashSet, any Serializable Set implementation would do. This is something you can't express in Java right now, a language design limitation you have to deal with. I think it's safer to use the interface and ignore this warning (or just check you're ok, without making it 100% sure). –  ymajoros Sep 13 '11 at 9:10
3  
@ymajoros: There is no sensible dfinition of the word "safe" for which your statement would be true. Safety is in fact exactly the reason why using the concrete type is a much better solution than ignoring the warning. –  Michael Borgwardt Sep 13 '11 at 9:56
4  
@Michael - the concrete type is no safer than an interface unless you are dealing with a "final" type. i can easily create a custom subclass of HashSet which is not serializable, so the compile check gains you nothing. if you are truly paranoid, then you should never set the collection directly from an outside instance, but always make a defensive copy. either way, my comments about using the interface are still valid: thus the warning is not helpful. –  jtahlborn Sep 15 '11 at 23:01

I know this is an old question that's already answered but just so others know is that you can set the Set<Integer> field as transient if you have no interest in serializing that particular field which will fix your FindBugs error.

public class TestClass implements Serializable {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1905162041950251407L;
    private transient Set<Integer> mySet;

}

I prefer this method instead of forcing users of your API to cast to your concrete type, unless it's just internal, then Michael Borgwardt's answer makes more sense.

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You could use a capture helper to ensure that a passed in Set supports two interfaces:

private static class SerializableTestClass<T extends Set<?> & Serializable> implements Serializable
{
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
    private final T serializableSet;

    private SerializableTestClass(T serializableSet)
    {
        this.serializableSet = serializableSet;
    }
}

public static class PublicApiTestClass
{
    public static <T extends Set<?> & Serializable> Serializable forSerializableSet(T set)
    {
        return new SerializableTestClass<T>(set);
    }
}

In this way you can have a public API that enforces Serializable without checking/requiring specific implementation details.

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I use a findbugs-exclude Filter for collection-Fields:

<Match>
    <Field type="java.util.Map" />
    <Bug pattern="SE_BAD_FIELD" />
</Match>
<Match>
    <Field type="java.util.Set" />
    <Bug pattern="SE_BAD_FIELD" />
</Match>
<Match>
    <Field type="java.util.List" />
    <Bug pattern="SE_BAD_FIELD" />
</Match>

See http://findbugs.sourceforge.net/manual/filter.html

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