Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am writing a compression program, and need to write bit data to a binary file using c++. If anyone could advise on the write statement, or a website with advice, I would be very grateful.

Apologies if this is a simple or confusing question, I am struggling to find answers on web.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Collect the bits into whole bytes, such as an unsigned char or std::bitset (where the bitset size is a multiple of CHAR_BIT), then write whole bytes at a time. Computers "deal with bits", but the available abstraction – especially for IO – is that you, as a programmer, deal with individual bytes. Bitwise manipulation can be used to toggle specific bits, but you're always handling byte-sized objects.

At the end of the output, if you don't have a whole byte, you'll need to decide how that should be stored. Both iostreams and stdio can write unformatted data using ostream::write and fwrite, respectively.

Instead of a single char or bitset<8> (8 being the most common value for CHAR_BIT), you might consider using a larger block size, such as an array of 4-32, or more, chars or the equivalent sized bitset.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Fred for your advice, that has given me a handle on where to look. – Drew C Feb 1 '11 at 11:39

For writing binary, the trick I have found most helpful is to store all the binary as a single array in memory and then move it all over to the hard drive. Doing a bit at a time, or a byte at a time, or an unsigned long long at a time is not as fast as having all the data stored in an array and using one instance of "fwrite()" to store it to the hard drive.

size_t fwrite ( const void * ptr, size_t size, size_t count, FILE * stream );

Ref: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/fwrite/

In English:

fwrite( [array* of stored data], [size in bytes of array OBJECT. For unsigned chars -> 1, for unsigned long longs -> 8], [number of instances in array], [FILE*])

Always check your returns for validation of success!

Additionally, an argument can be made that having the object type be as large as possible is the fastest way to go ([unsigned long long] > [char]). While I am not versed in the coding behind "fwrite()", I feel the time to convert from the natural object used in your code to [unsigned long long] will take more time when combined with the writing than the "fwrite()" making due with what you have.

Back when I was learning Huffman Coding, it took me a few hours to realize that there was a difference between [char] and [unsigned char]. Notice for this method that you should always use unsigned variables to store the pure binary.

share|improve this answer

by below class you can write and read bit by bit

class bitChar{
public:
    unsigned char* c;
    int shift_count;
    string BITS;

    bitChar()
    {
        shift_count = 0;
        c = (unsigned char*)calloc(1, sizeof(char));
    }

    string readByBits(ifstream& inf)
    {
        string s ="";
        char buffer[1];
        while (inf.read (buffer, 1))
        {
            s += getBits(*buffer);
        }
        return s;
    }

    void setBITS(string X)
    {
        BITS = X;
    }

    int insertBits(ofstream& outf)
    {
        int total = 0;

        while(BITS.length())
        {
            if(BITS[0] == '1')
                *c |= 1;
            *c <<= 1;
            ++shift_count;
            ++total;
            BITS.erase(0, 1);

            if(shift_count == 7 )
            {
                if(BITS.size()>0)
                {
                    if(BITS[0] == '1')
                        *c |= 1;
                    ++total;
                    BITS.erase(0, 1);
                }

                writeBits(outf);
                shift_count = 0;
                free(c);
                c = (unsigned char*)calloc(1, sizeof(char));
            }
        }

        if(shift_count > 0)
        {
            *c <<= (7 - shift_count);
            writeBits(outf);
            free(c);
            c = (unsigned char*)calloc(1, sizeof(char));
        }
        outf.close();
        return total;
    }

    string getBits(unsigned char X)
    {
        stringstream itoa;
        for(unsigned s = 7; s > 0 ; s--)
        {
            itoa << ((X >> s) & 1);
        }

        itoa << (X&1) ;
        return itoa.str();
    }

    void writeBits(ofstream& outf)
    {
        outf << *c;
    }

    ~bitChar()
    {
        if(c)
            free(c);
    }
};

for example

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string> 
#include <stdlib.h>
using namespace std;


int main()
{
    ofstream outf("Sample.dat");
    ifstream inf("Sample.dat");

    string enCoded = "101000001010101010";

    //write to file
    cout << enCoded << endl ; //print  101000001010101010
    bitChar bchar;
    bchar.setBITS(enCoded);
    bchar.insertBits(outf);

     //read from file
    string decoded =bchar.readByBits(inf);
    cout << decoded << endl ; //print 101000001010101010000000
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.