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I'd like to remove the lines in this data frame that contain NAs across all columns. Below is my example data frame.

             gene hsap mmul mmus rnor cfam
1 ENSG00000208234    0   NA   NA   NA   NA
2 ENSG00000199674    0   2    2    2    2
3 ENSG00000221622    0   NA   NA   NA   NA
4 ENSG00000207604    0   NA   NA   1    2
5 ENSG00000207431    0   NA   NA   NA   NA
6 ENSG00000221312    0   1    2    3    2

Basically, I'd like to get a data frame such as the following.

             gene hsap mmul mmus rnor cfam
2 ENSG00000199674    0   2    2    2    2
6 ENSG00000221312    0   1    2    3    2

Also, I'd like to know how to only filter for some columns, so I can also get a data frame like this:

             gene hsap mmul mmus rnor cfam
2 ENSG00000199674    0   2    2    2    2
4 ENSG00000207604    0   NA   NA   1    2
6 ENSG00000221312    0   1    2    3    2
share|improve this question

10 Answers 10

up vote 463 down vote accepted

Also check complete.cases :

> final[complete.cases(final),]
             gene hsap mmul mmus rnor cfam
2 ENSG00000199674    0    2    2    2    2
6 ENSG00000221312    0    1    2    3    2

na.omit is nicer for just removing all NA's. complete.cases allows partial selection by using part of the dataframe :

> final[complete.cases(final[,5:6]),]
             gene hsap mmul mmus rnor cfam
2 ENSG00000199674    0    2    2    2    2
4 ENSG00000207604    0   NA   NA    1    2
6 ENSG00000221312    0    1    2    3    2

Your solution can't work. If you insist on using is.na, then you have to do something like:

> final[rowSums(is.na(final[,5:6]))==0,]
             gene hsap mmul mmus rnor cfam
2 ENSG00000199674    0    2    2    2    2
4 ENSG00000207604    0   NA   NA    1    2
6 ENSG00000221312    0    1    2    3    2

but using complete.cases is quite a lot more clear, and faster.

share|improve this answer
13  
That is great - I knew na.omit, but never seen complete.cases before. This is exactly why I find R difficult, there is way too many options available ! – Benoit B. Feb 1 '11 at 12:29
1  
What is the significance of the trailing comma in final[complete.cases(final),]? – hertzsprung Oct 1 '12 at 11:39
1  
@hertzsprung You need to select rows, not columns. How else would you do that? – Joris Meys Oct 1 '12 at 12:05
2  
@JorisMeys: Got it, temporary brain failure, I'm still new to R. – hertzsprung Oct 1 '12 at 13:33
2  
Is there a simple negation of complete.cases? If I wanted to keep the rows with NAs instead of discarding? final[ ! complete.cases(final),] doesn't cooperate... – Matt O'Brien Aug 18 '15 at 2:46

Try na.omit(your.data.frame). As for the second question, try posting it as another question (for clarity).

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I prefer following way to check whether rows contain any NAs:

row.has.na <- apply(final, 1, function(x){any(is.na(x))})

This returns logical vector with values denoting whether there is any NA in a row. You can use it to see how many rows you'll have to drop:

sum(row.has.na)

and eventually drop them

final.filtered <- final[!row.has.na,]

For filtering rows with certain part of NAs it becomes a little trickier (for example, you can feed 'final[,5:6]' to 'apply'). Generally, Joris Meys' solution seems to be more elegant.

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3  
what I was looking for. might be less R-ish but is more decent langage'ish. – nicolas Oct 6 '12 at 17:00

Another option if you want greater control over how rows are deemed to be invalid is

final <- final[!(is.na(final$rnor)) | !(is.na(rawdata$cfam)),]

Using the above, this:

             gene hsap mmul mmus rnor cfam
1 ENSG00000208234    0   NA   NA   NA   2
2 ENSG00000199674    0   2    2    2    2
3 ENSG00000221622    0   NA   NA   2   NA
4 ENSG00000207604    0   NA   NA   1    2
5 ENSG00000207431    0   NA   NA   NA   NA
6 ENSG00000221312    0   1    2    3    2

Becomes:

             gene hsap mmul mmus rnor cfam
1 ENSG00000208234    0   NA   NA   NA   2
2 ENSG00000199674    0   2    2    2    2
3 ENSG00000221622    0   NA   NA   2   NA
4 ENSG00000207604    0   NA   NA   1    2
6 ENSG00000221312    0   1    2    3    2

...where only row 5 is removed since it is the only row containing NAs for both rnor AND cfam. The boolean logic can then be changed to fit specific requirements.

share|improve this answer
    
I was a programmer of Java or Python,this one is more general and as well readable as complete.case(). – WeiChing Lin May 16 '14 at 4:08

If you want control over how many NAs are valid for each row, try this function. For many survey data sets, too many blank question responses can ruin the results. So they are deleted after a certain threshold. This function will allow you to choose how many NAs the row can have before it's deleted:

delete.na <- function(DF, n=0) {
  log <- apply(df, 2, is.na)
  logindex <- apply(log, 1, function(x) sum(x) <= n)
  df[logindex, ]
}

By default, it will eliminate all NAs:

delete.na(final)
             gene hsap mmul mmus rnor cfam
2 ENSG00000199674    0    2    2    2    2
6 ENSG00000221312    0    1    2    3    2

Or specify the maximum number of NAs allowed:

delete.na(final, 2)
             gene hsap mmul mmus rnor cfam
2 ENSG00000199674    0    2    2    2    2
4 ENSG00000207604    0   NA   NA    1    2
6 ENSG00000221312    0    1    2    3    2
share|improve this answer

This will return the rows that have at least ONE non-NA value.

final[rowSums(is.na(final))<length(final),]

This will return the rows that have at least TWO non-NA value.

final[rowSums(is.na(final))<(length(final)-1),]
share|improve this answer

We can also use the subset function for this.

finalData<-subset(data,!(is.na(data["mmul"]) | is.na(data["rnor"])))

This will give only those rows that do not have NA in both mmul and rnor

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I am a synthesizer:). Here I combined the answers into one function:

#' keep rows that have a certain number of NAs anywhere/somewhere and delete others
#' @param df a data frame
#' @param col restrict to the columns where you would like to search for NA; eg, 3, c(3), 2:5, "place", c("place","age")
#' \cr default is NULL, search for all columns
#' @param n integer or vector, 0, c(3,5), number/range of NAs allowed.
#' \cr Range includes both ends 3<=n<=5
#' \cr Range could be -Inf, Inf
#' @return returns a new df with rows that have NA(s) removed
#' @export
z.na.keep = function(df, col=NULL, n=0){
    if (!is.null(col)) {
        df.temp = df[,col]
    } else {
        df.temp = df
    }

    if (length(n)==1){
        if (n==0) {
            # simply call complete.cases which might be faster
            result = df[complete.cases(df.temp),]
        } else {
            # credit: http://stackoverflow.com/a/30461945/2292993
            log <- apply(df.temp, 2, is.na)
            logindex <- apply(log, 1, function(x) sum(x) == n)
            result = df[logindex, ]
        }
    }

    if (length(n)==2){
        min = n[1]; max = n[2]
        log <- apply(df.temp, 2, is.na)
        logindex <- apply(log, 1, function(x) {sum(x) >= min && sum(x) <= max})
        result = df[logindex, ]
    }

    return(result)
}
share|improve this answer

For your first question, I have a code that I am comfortable with to get rid of all NAs. Thanks for @Gregor to make it simpler.

final[!(rowSums(is.na(final))),]

For the second question, the code is just an alternation from the previous solution.

final[as.logical((rowSums(is.na(final))-5)),]

Notice the -5 is the number of columns in your data. This will eliminate rows with all NAs, since the rowSums adds up to 5 and they become zeroes after subtraction. This time, as.logical is necessary.

Hope you enjoy!

share|improve this answer
    
To simplify more, I think as.logical is redundant, the ! automatically coerces to logical. final[!(rowSums(is.na(final))),] works just the same. – Gregor Feb 9 at 18:04
    
@Gregor Thanks for correcting me ~ – LegitMe Feb 10 at 19:43

If you have a very large data.frame() and the data is of a consistent type (or can be made into such for processing), I suggest keeping it in matrix() format and using complete.cases() as previously described. These two things should improve the indexing speed by an order of magnitude. The data.table package also has nice fast subsetting features, with the complete.cases() method outperforming that of matrices (it was the fastest I tested).

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