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is there any difference between declaring a variable

var a=0;//1

and this way

a=0;//2

or

window.a=0;//3

in global scope?

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2  
AFAIK var a = 0; does not work in IE when accessing the variable via another external js file which is declared in another js file –  Aivan Monceller Feb 1 '11 at 11:56
    
I donot know about window.a but the other 2 ways are the same in global scope. –  programmer Feb 1 '11 at 11:56
1  
@AivanMonceller really? link please. –  Raynos Feb 1 '11 at 11:58
    
@Raynos, I experience it on my own website. IE6 to be specific. I could not get my var enum to appear which is on an external js file and i am referencing it as an inline javascript on an html file –  Aivan Monceller Feb 1 '11 at 12:00
    
@Ashwini In the global scope, window is the global object (in browsers). var a = 1; console.log(a); console.log(win –  leebriggs Feb 1 '11 at 12:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 229 down vote accepted

Yes, there are two differences, though in practical terms they're not usually big ones.

Your three statements explained

var a=0;

...creates a variable on the variable object for the global execution context, which is the global object, which on browsers is aliased as window (and is a DOM window object rather than just a generic object as it would be on non-browser implementations). The symbol window is, itself, actually a property of the global (window) object that it uses to point to itself.

The upshot of all that is: It creates a property on window that you cannot delete. It's also defined before the first line of code runs (see "When var happens" below).

Note that on IE8 and earlier, the property created on window is not enumerable (doesn't show up in for..in statements). In IE9, Chrome, Firefox, and Opera, it's enumerable.


a=0;

...creates a property on the window object implicitly. As it's a normal property, you can delete it. I'd recommend not doing this, it can be unclear to anyone reading your code later.

And interestingly, again on IE8 and earlier, the property created not enumerable (doesn't show up in for..in statements). That's odd, particularly given the below.


window.a=0;

...creates a property on the window object explicitly. As it's a normal property, you can delete it.

This property is enumerable, on IE8 and earlier, and on every other browser I've tried.

A fourth way

There's yet another way to do this, btw:

this.a=0;

...because in the global execution context, this references the global object. So this.a=0; is identical to window.a=0; (except it may be a teensy, teensy bit faster because this doesn't have to be looked up; probably impossible to measure in any real world scenario).

Since this is the same as window.a=0;, it's no surprise that this creates an enumerable property (even on IE8 and below).


Deleting properties

What do I mean by "deleting" it? Exactly that: Removing the property (entirely) via the delete keyword:

window.a = 0;
display("'a' in window? " + ('a' in window)); // displays "true"
delete window.a;
display("'a' in window? " + ('a' in window)); // displays "false"

delete completely removes a property from an object. You can't do that with properties added to window indirectly via var, the delete is either silently ignored or throws an exception (depending on the JavaScript implementation and whether you're in strict mode).

Warning: Internet Explorer won't let you delete properties of the window object, even when you should be allowed to. Worse, it throws an exception when you try (try this experiment in IE and in other browsers). So when deleting from the window object, you have to be defensive:

try {
    delete window.prop;
}
catch (e) {
    window.prop = undefined;
}

That tries to delete the property, and if an exception is thrown it does the next best thing and sets the property to undefined.

This only applies to the window object, and only (as far as I know) to IE. Other browsers are fine with deleting window properties, subject to the rules above.


When var happens

There's another difference between the var version and the others. It relates to when the symbol is created. The symbols defined via the var statement are created before any step-by-step code in the execution context is run, and so the property exists well before the var statement.

This can be confusing, so let's take a look:

display("foo in window? " + ('foo' in window)); // displays "true"
display("window.foo = " + window.foo);          // displays "undefined"
display("bar in window? " + ('bar' in window)); // displays "false"
display("window.bar = " + window.bar);          // displays "undefined"
var foo = "f";
bar = "b";
display("foo in window? " + ('foo' in window)); // displays "true"
display("window.foo = " + window.foo);          // displays "f"
display("bar in window? " + ('bar' in window)); // displays "true"
display("window.bar = " + window.bar);          // displays "b"

Live example

As you can see, the symbol foo is defined before the first line, but the symbol bar isn't. Where the var foo = "f"; statement is, there are really two things: defining the symbol, which happens before the first line of code is run; and doing an assignment to that symbol, which happens where the line is in the step-by-step flow. (See Poor misunderstood var)


Off-topic: Avoid cluttering window

The window object gets very, very cluttered with properties. Whenever possible, strongly recommend not adding to the mess. Instead, wrap up your symbols in a little package and export at most one symbol to the window object. (I frequently don't export any symbols to the window object.) You can use a function to contain all of your code in order to contain your symbols, and that function can be anonymous if you like:

(function() {
    var a = 0; // `a` is NOT a property of `window` now

    function foo() {
        alert(a);   // Alerts "0", because `foo` can access `a`
    }
})();

In that example, we define a function and have it executed right away (the () at the end).

A function used in this way is frequently called a scoping function. Functions defined within the scoping function can access variables defined in the scoping function because they're closures over that data (see: Closures are not complicated).

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8  
Writing all that in 7 minutes - pretty good going :) –  nchaud Dec 7 '13 at 22:00
1  
+2 million for dead-simple explanation of so much stuff. –  Zlatko Feb 4 at 15:56
    
Nice explanation ! –  Kosmo Jul 16 at 12:15

Keeping it simple :

a = 0

The code above gives a global scope variable

var a = 0;

This code will give a variable to be used in the current scope, and under it

window.a = 0;

This generally is same as the global variable.

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Your statements "The code above gives a global scope variable" and "This code will give a variable to be used in the current scope, and under it", taken together, suggest that you can't use the first line and access a under the current scope. You can. Also, your use of "global variable" is a bit off -- the two places you say "global variable" are no more global than the place you don't say it. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 1 '11 at 12:34
    
global itself means that you can access/read/write the variable anywhere, including the place where i mentioned current scope, that is so obvious. And if you suggest that window.a and 'a' wont be global in the script then you are 100% wrong. –  Umair Feb 1 '11 at 12:52
    
If you declare a = 0; or window.a = 0; then these both variables can be accessed anywhere on the page, under any script and any scope. and I said they both are generally the same thing because you can access window.a by just a, and vice versa. –  Umair Feb 1 '11 at 12:57
    
@Umair: "global itself means that you can access/read/write the variable anywhere" Right. Again, you seem to be calling out the first and last as more "global" than the middle, which of course they aren't. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 1 '11 at 13:00
1  
the middle one is considered to be used inside a function, all of them would be same if used under the main scope. using var inside a function was my assumption –  Umair Feb 1 '11 at 13:18
<title>Index.html</title>
<script>
    var varDeclaration = true;
    noVarDeclaration = true;
    window.hungOnWindow = true;
    document.hungOnDocument = true;
</script>
<script src="external.js"></script>



/*
**
***
****
*****
******
*******
********
    external.js
********
*******
******
*****
****
***
**
*/

console.info(varDeclaration == true); // could be .log, alert etc
// returns false in IE8

console.info(noVarDeclaration == true); // could be .log, alert etc
// returns false in IE8

console.info(window.hungOnWindow == true); // could be .log, alert etc
// returns true in IE8

console.info(document.hungOnDocument == true); // could be .log, alert etc
// returns ??? in IE8 (untested!)  *I personally find this more clugy than hanging off window obj

Is there a global object that all vars are hung off of by default? eg: 'globals.noVar declaration'

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Very nice exploration. The definite guide to using window.* declaration. This declaration looks most safe against copy-pasting your code, and clear also. –  Dan Nov 20 '12 at 19:33

In global scope there is no semantic difference.

But you really should avoid a=0 since your setting a value to an undeclared variable.

Also use closures to avoid editing global scope at all

(function() {
   // do stuff locally

   // Hoist something to global scope
   window.someGlobal = someLocal
}());

Always use closures and always hoist to global scope when its absolutely neccesary. You should be using asynchronous event handling for most of your communication anyway.

As @AvianMoncellor mentioned there is an IE bug with var a = foo only declaring a global for file scope. This is an issue with IE's notorious broken interpreter. This bug does sound familiar so it's probably true.

So stick to window.globalName = someLocalpointer

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1  
"In global scope there is no semantic difference." Actually, there's a huge semantic difference, the mechanisms by which the property gets defined are completely different -- but in practical terms it boils down to only a small actual difference (in that you can't delete a var). –  T.J. Crowder Feb 1 '11 at 12:08
    
@T.J. Crowder I didn't know that. I thought variable declaration was setting properties on the variable object. Didn't know those couldn't be deleted. –  Raynos Feb 1 '11 at 12:42
    
Yup. They're also defined earlier if you use var. They're just completely different mechanisms that have much the same practical result. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Feb 1 '11 at 12:44
    
@T.J. Crowder I forgot to mention that var jumps to the stop of scope. –  Raynos Feb 1 '11 at 12:58

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