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I grant permission to NETWORK SERVICE manually to have access to C:\inetpub\wwwroot so ASP.NET can do something like reading and writing local files.

Is there a security reason this permission has not been granted by default ?

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Are you using Windows 2003? –  kd7 Feb 1 '11 at 13:47
    
@RandomNoob: Server 2008 enterprise –  Xaqron Feb 1 '11 at 13:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is due to the principle of defence in depth - not giving permissions unless explicitly granted.

Such defaults make for a more secure IIS and operating system.

Several years ago Microsoft went through a very large push towards securing windows by default - this setting is part of that push.

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Curious, how exactly does deference-in-depth relate to default-deny behaviour? –  Tullo Jan 24 '13 at 23:38

Per this article on MSDN:

The Network Service account has Read and Execute permissions on the IIS server root folder by default. The IIS server root folder is named Wwwroot. This means that an ASP.NET application deployed inside the root folder already has Read and Execute permissions to its application folders. However, if your ASP.NET application needs to use files or folders in other locations, you must specifically enable access.

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Written on August 2005 applying to .NET 2.0 and Windows Server 2003. –  Oded Feb 1 '11 at 13:49
    
See my comment on the original question, he didn't specify what OS he is using, he could be using .NET 2.0 and Win2k3, a lot of people still do. –  kd7 Feb 1 '11 at 13:50
    
He is using Win2k8... –  Oded Feb 1 '11 at 13:51
    
Fair enough, he specified later - not certain if the behavior is different in Win2k8, can't find a definite resource. –  kd7 Feb 1 '11 at 13:53

usually on the web server just few folders are allowed to write to avoid potential security holes.

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