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The seemingly trivial task of selecting rows in a data frame and then ordering them is eluding me, and driving me crazy at the same time. For example, lets have a trivial data frame:

country = c("US", "US", "CA", "US")
company = c("Apple", "Google", "RIM", "MS")
vals = c(100, 70, 50, 90)
df <- data.frame(country, company, vals)

Lets order it by vals

> df[order(vals),]
  country company vals
3      CA     RIM   50
2      US  Google   70
4      US      MS   90
1      US   Apple  100

Works perfectly. Lets now try to select only US companies, and order there values. We get some bogus result.

> df[country=="US", ][order(vals),]
    country company vals
4       US      MS   90
2       US  Google   70
NA    <NA>    <NA>   NA
1       US   Apple  100

Lets order, and then select. Again, a bogus result

> df[order(vals),][country=="US", ]
  country company vals
3      CA     RIM   50
2      US  Google   70
1      US   Apple  100

How do I get a data frame, which only includes US companies, and is sorted by val?

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Remove the variables used to create df before you start doing this, as these will get found not the ones in df. This doesn't solve the problem, but will help... –  Gavin Simpson Feb 1 '11 at 14:35
1  

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Not sure you can do this via a set of subsetting calls to [, as you need to refer to ordered or reduced data frame at the second subsetting call. One way is to order the data and supply this to subset() to choose rows from this ordered data frame:

> with(df, subset(df[order(vals),], subset = country == "US"))
  country company vals
2      US  Google   70
4      US      MS   90
1      US   Apple  100
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+1 I always prefer the subset approach. Slight simplification -- you don't need to say subset = inside the subset() call. –  Prasad Chalasani Feb 1 '11 at 14:53
3  
I'm always wary of positional matching, especially when demonstrating code or writing reproducible code for my work, because if I, in the above, write subset = FOO, I obviously meant to use subset and not some other argument. So you're right, I don't need to spell this out, but I find it is safer to do so, just in case. –  Gavin Simpson Feb 1 '11 at 14:55

I always found it odd that base R didn't have a convenience for reordering a data frame like it does for subsetting. So I wrote my own:

library(plyr)
arrange(subset(df, country == "US"), vals)
share|improve this answer
> df[df$country=="US",][order(df[df$country=="US","vals"]),]
  country company vals
2      US  Google   70
4      US      MS   90
1      US   Apple  100

I think it's a good habit to remove the original variables and just work with the dataframe (so df$country instead of country).

share|improve this answer
    
That works, but you are, in effect, doing the country=="US" subsetting twice. It would be easier to do the two steps separately, especially if the compute cost of country=="US" is high on the the real data, e.g.: tmp <- df[order(df$vals), ] followed by tmp[tmp$country == "US",]. Replace tmp with df if the reordering step is not harmful. –  Gavin Simpson Feb 1 '11 at 14:44
    
I agree, and I had first written your exact two-liner. For some reason though I decided to combine the steps. I like your solution better. –  ncray Feb 1 '11 at 15:04

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